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By Elaine Tassy and Elaine Tassy,Sun Staff Writer | November 10, 1994
Baltimore County school officials are investigating allegations that a substitute bus driver used racial epithets to describe unruly Pikesville Middle School students when she refused to take them home last week and returned the bus and the students to the school.The substitute driver, Theresa Beggs, 55, denied making the comments. But the bus ride has ignited a controversy at the school, where about a dozen concerned parents attended a PTA meeting to address the issue last night.At the meeting, it was also alleged that the bus was driven with the emergency door open for about a minute.
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NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | June 16, 2013
See if this makes sense to you: For years, I've argued with certain African-American people about their insistence upon using the so-called N-word which, to my ears, is, inalterably, a statement of self-loathing. They say I don't understand. They say the word no longer means what it has always meant. They say it's just a friendly fraternal greeting. I say one cannot arbitrarily decide that a word -- especially an old and bloodstained word -- suddenly means something other than what it always has. I say that while language does change over time, it doesn't do so because a few of us want it to or tell it to. And I say that if I call you an "idiot," but say that "idiot" now means "genius," you will be no less insulted.
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NEWS
By Elaine Tassy and Elaine Tassy,SUN STAFF | September 27, 1996
Baltimore County Police Officer William R. Goodman testified yesterday he didn't beat or hurl racial epithets at an Essex drug dealer last year, but said he tapped the man lightly on the cheeks at the time of the incident because he thought the man was intoxicated.And Goodman -- a 10-year police veteran on trial in Baltimore County Circuit Court charged with battery and with a hate crime -- acknowledged that he cursed at Melvin Maddox during the July 29, 1995 incident."Sometimes, ma'am, you have to lower yourself so they can understand you," he told Baltimore County Assistant State's Attorney Sue A. Schenning.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | February 19, 2012
Anne Arundel County activists plan to publicly denounce on Monday "a climate of insensitivity and intolerance" that members of the Anne Arundel County Council have fostered, an Annapolis civil rights leader wrote Saturday. "We have seen racially insensitive comments made by some members of the County Council and now is the time to publicly express our dissatisfaction," wrote Carl O. Snowden, director of the state attorney general's Office of Civil Rights, in an email to activists.
NEWS
By ANDREA F. SIEGEL | January 14, 2006
A white Pasadena business owner opened his auto body shop yesterday morning to find anti-black and anti-Jewish epithets as well as profanity scratched into a concrete ramp that had been poured Thursday at the side of the shop. "It was like a statement they were making. But don't make that statement around me. I don't live like that, I don't believe that," said Don Reed, 68, owner of Chesapeake Body and Frame in the 8100 block of Hog Neck Road. Anne Arundel County police are investigating the property destruction, which comes as an umbrella group is planning to hold a meeting Jan. 31 to discuss how to deal with hate crimes and other racial, religious and ethnic incidents.
NEWS
By Erin Texeira and Erin Texeira,SUN STAFF | September 24, 1996
An unidentified man stopped his truck at the site of a Howard County public works project Friday and hurled a racial epithet at a predominantly black work crew, then returned minutes later to berate them again, Howard County police said yesterday.Six men were fixing a broken water line on Montgomery Road near Washington Boulevard in Elkridge about 5 p.m. when a white man in his 30s driving a Toyota truck stopped and began screaming at the crew to work harder, said Thaddeus Mitchell Jr., 35, the crew leader, who reported the incident to police.
NEWS
May 6, 1992
* Rosena Allen, 70, of Baltimore, baby-sitter in Howard County:Yes. The principal should take the child to the office and explain the situation. Sometimes you could nip it in the bud; sometimes you have to go further. Some children aren't mean, aren't bad. They just want to show off. So I believe first you have to start on the easy side. If that doesn't work, then you have to call the parents in if the principal and counselor can't handle it.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | October 6, 1998
Howard County police have arrested a 53-year-old man accused of slashing tires and scratching racial epithets into cars the Columbia Palace 9 movie theater over the weekend.Roger Thomas Nichols of no fixed address is charged with six counts of destruction of property, a hate crime and possession of a concealed deadly weapon, police said.About 4: 30 p.m. Sunday, police said, someone scratched a racial epithet into three cars parked on the theater lot. Police officers responded and took reports, said Sgt. Morris Carroll, a police spokesman.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Daily News | March 11, 1993
LOS ANGELES -- Under relentless cross-examination by defense attorneys, Rodney King admitted he lied in the past about some aspects of his beating, and he testified he is not now sure if the police officers who beat and kicked him used racial epithets.Saying he initially denied that racial slurs were used at the request of his mother, Mr. King said yesterday that his testimony the previous day was the truth but he couldn't be sure whether the officers were saying "nigger" or "killer" as he was taunted during his violent arrest on March 3, 1991.
NEWS
By Lacy McCrary and Lacy McCrary,KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | August 21, 1997
PHILADELPHIA - Daisy Myers vividly remembers the rocks through the windows, the taunts and name-calling and cross-burnings and the day-and-night blaring of "Old Black Joe" that greeted her arrival as a member of the first African-American family in Levittown, Pa., 40 years ago.Memories of nights, more than a week of them, in which a mob that was estimated from 200 to 1,000 people gathered along Deepgreen Lane in the Dog Hollow section screaming racial epithets,...
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | November 16, 2010
The doctors told Detective Jermaine Cook that the injury to his left eye was like placing a grape in a bag, slicing it in half, and then smashing it flat. The beer mug slung at his face by a Joppa man in May had caused irreparable damage. Cook, a Baltimore police officer who patrolled the toughest parts of the city, is now legally blind and can't drive long distances or at night. He's had trouble taking care of his children without assistance and has seen his income — which used to include significant overtime pay — drop substantially.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2010
An off-duty Baltimore police officer who called 911 after being struck in an eye with a glass beer mug calmly but urgently requested backup as men hurled racial epithets and threatened to hang him, according to a copy of the tape obtained by The Baltimore Sun. A Harford County district judge lifted the $1 million bond set by a court commissioner and ordered Friday that the Joppa man accused of striking Detective Jermaine Cook be held without bond....
NEWS
By Erin Aubry Kaplan and Erin Aubry Kaplan,Los Angeles Times | April 15, 2007
The N Word Who Can Say It, Who Shouldn't, and Why By Jabari Asim Houghton Mifflin / 278 pages / $26 What's in a word? When it comes to the N-word, the better question is, what isn't? Whatever one thinks of its usage, the granddaddy of ethnic slurs is much more than a stick or stone that can be deflected with self-esteem and forgotten until the next encounter. The word is not singular and never has been. It is a social orientation, a state of mind so deeply embedded in the collective American unconscious - and the conscious - it's not perceived as a problem; it's part of who we are. It is a 400-year-old storm front that has never blown over, a forked tongue of lightning that can crash overhead without warning or welcome, breaking the fragile continuum of American conversations about race.
NEWS
By RICHARD A. SERRANO | May 5, 2006
ALEXANDRIA, Va. -- For all his taunts, jeers and bombast, Zacarias Moussaoui did not get the last word. When he was formally sentenced yesterday for his role as a Sept. 11 conspirator, U.S. District Judge Leonie M. Brinkema had the final say. And she did it with a touch of poetry. "You came here to be a martyr, and to die in a great big bang of glory," the judge told him. "But to paraphrase the poet T.S. Eliot, instead you will die with a whimper. The rest of your life you will spend in prison."
NEWS
By ANDREA F. SIEGEL | January 14, 2006
A white Pasadena business owner opened his auto body shop yesterday morning to find anti-black and anti-Jewish epithets as well as profanity scratched into a concrete ramp that had been poured Thursday at the side of the shop. "It was like a statement they were making. But don't make that statement around me. I don't live like that, I don't believe that," said Don Reed, 68, owner of Chesapeake Body and Frame in the 8100 block of Hog Neck Road. Anne Arundel County police are investigating the property destruction, which comes as an umbrella group is planning to hold a meeting Jan. 31 to discuss how to deal with hate crimes and other racial, religious and ethnic incidents.
NEWS
By ANDREA F. SIEGEL and ANDREA F. SIEGEL,SUN REPORTER | November 11, 2005
A white Hanover teenager pleaded guilty yesterday in Anne Arundel County Circuit Court to committing a hate crime by scraping a profanity-laced racial epithet into a black neighbor's car - an act of vandalism that some in the African-American community said showed racial tensions in the county. Assistant State's Attorney Laura S. Kiessling said she would seek jail time for Alan Lee Davis, 19, for the damage to the car belonging to Joan and Barry Turner when Davis is sentenced Dec. 22. Davis' lawyer said he would seek probation before judgment.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | December 3, 1992
Shuttle Discovery is on a secret military maneuver in space the battles below having been won.In Russia, the words conservative and communist mean the same thing. In the U.S., it's more complex.What if China and Hong Kong went to war and Hong Kong won?Organized Baseball will not tolerate racial epithets from an insensitive and arrogant owner who is not one of the boys.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF Staff writer Dan Thanh Dang contributed to this article | September 22, 1995
An award-winning Baltimore County police officer has been indicted under Maryland's hate-crime statute -- charged with uttering racial epithets while punching and kicking a suspect at the Essex Precinct in July.Officer William R. Goodman Jr., 34, a bicycle patrolman with nine years on the force, also was accused of two other misdemeanor counts -- battery and misconduct in office -- in the indictment this week by a Baltimore County grand jury."There has not been another case like this in Baltimore County," Deputy State's Attorney Sue A. Schenning said yesterday, while the lawyer representing Officer Goodman knew of none against police officers anywhere in Maryland.
NEWS
By Sara Neufeld and Sara Neufeld,SUN STAFF | June 4, 2004
With Perry Hall High School officials scrambling to recall yearbooks containing a racial epithet, the custodians who were first to arrive at school yesterday discovered the same epithet spray-painted on the school sidewalk. The epithet "is just a word," read the letters in red spray paint near the west entrance of the school, a police report said. The words were accompanied by a symbol representing anarchy and white supremacy, the report said. Baltimore County police are investigating the incident as a racially motivated crime, said Officer Shawn Vinson, a Police Department spokesman.
NEWS
By Bill McCauley and Sara Neufeld and Bill McCauley and Sara Neufeld,Sun Staff | June 3, 2004
Someone painted a racial epithet on the sidewalk at one of the entrances to Perry Hall High overnight, one day after school officials began collecting yearbooks so the same word could be removed from one of its pages. "I think someone just wanted to make some trouble," Charles A. Herndon, the Baltimore County school system's spokesman, said this morning. The perpetrators "may have been goaded" by the incident with the yearbooks, he said. A school custodian discovered the word and the symbol for anarchy, an A with a circle around it, spray-painted on a side entrance to the school early this morning.
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