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September 27, 1992
Nora Ephron, best known for writing scripts for the movies "Silkwood," "When Harry Met Sally" and "Heartburn," was in Baltimore last week for her newest film, "Sleepless in Seattle." She and her crew, which included Academy Award-winning director of photography Sven Nykvist, selected Baltimore as the best place to get the East Coast scenery needed in the movie, which is being filmed primarily in Seattle.Ephron is directing the romantic comedy, starring Tom Hanks as a widower and Meg Ryan as a Baltimore Sun reporter, for Tri Star production.
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HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | July 6, 2012
The underlying medical condition that contributed to the death of writer and filmmaker Nora Ephron and is forcing ABC news anchor Robin Roberts to get a bone marrow transplant is a rare and complicated disease that scientists are still trying to figure out. Both women were afflicted with myelodysplastic syndrome, a group of disorders caused when the body produces damaged blood cells. Abnormal cells can eventually outnumber good cells, leaving people with low blood cell counts and needing transfusions and other treatments.
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FEATURES
By SYLVIA BADGER | June 13, 1993
Writer-director Nora Ephron, who wrote the scripts for "Silkwood," "When Harry Met Sally," and "Heartburn," will be in town this week for an exclusive, invitation-only screening of her new movie, "Sleepless in Seattle," at the Senator Theatre. This romantic comedy, partially shot in Maryland, is a Tri-Star production starring Tom Hanks as a widower and Meg Ryan as a Baltimore Sun reporter.Ephron will be the guest of the Producers Club of Maryland, a foundation set up to support and enhance Maryland's film industry.
FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | June 28, 2012
Nora Ephron, who died this week, will be remember for writing books such as "Heartburn" and movies such as "Julie and Julia. " But around here, as Baltimore Sun columnist Susan Reimer notes, she'll also be remembered for helping to bring Baltimore to the big screen, as a setting for the classic comedy/love story "When Harry Met Sally. " "Sleepless in Seattle. " Here's an excerpt from Reimer's story: Ephron ... was called in to doctor a screenplay about a long-distance love affair between an architect in Seattle ( Tom Hanks )
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | March 16, 1992
What's all this about a director being a general, moving an army of actors and technicians to his whim?Nora Ephron isn't having any of it, thank you very much."
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | June 25, 1993
With one magic eyebrow cocked in a posture of utterly civilized disbelief, Nora Ephron says, "Lancaster. Lancaster, Pennsylvania?"It's somewhat like Dorothy Parker, with the same facial expression, saying, "Pig's knuckles?"But yes, so an early draft of the script of "Sleepless in Seattle" read, a love story about a Seattle architect and a newspaper reporter in . . . Lancaster, Pennsylvania."I couldn't write a movie set in a city without a major-league team," Ephron said emphatically, as if she were explaining an immutable law of physics.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,Sun Staff | February 11, 2001
I have a friend who has seen "When Harry Met Sally" so many times she can quote entire monologues from the movie. Another buddy is an absolute pain to see the film with because he will recite each line of every scene -- as it's being said. And then there's the friend who slips the movie into her VCR whenever she's had a bad day at work or an argument with her boyfriend. As for me, I've probably seen "When Harry Met Sally," oh, a mere 40 times since it hit the big screen in 1989. For my friends and many other twentysomethings I've met, writer Nora Ephron's romantic comedy is the quintessential contemporary feel-good relationship movie that somehow still rings true -- which is interesting, considering it was written 15 years ago in the mid-'80s.
NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Staff Writer | September 13, 1992
All the Peabody Conservatory library had to do was look its elegant self yesterday while a film crew set up lights, cameras and microphones to shoot a romantic comedy starring Tom Hanks and Meg Ryan.The landmark on tree-lined Mount Vernon Street was the centerpiece for two scenes with Ms. Ryan, who plays a reporter at The Sun destined to meet Mr. Hanks, an architect in Seattle, at the end of the movie.The crew will be filming "Sleepless in Seattle" in Baltimore through Thursday. Mr. Hanks is not in town.
NEWS
By GARRY WILLS | July 6, 1993
Chicago. -- This movie -- ''Sleepless in Seattle'' -- had me hooked from one of its opening credits: ''A Nora Ephron film.'' After all, her parents wrote one of my favorite movies, ''Desk Set.'' And Ms. Ephron herself, after spending most of her life running away from her parents' world, has returned to it in order to write and direct movies that reveal her quirky sensibility.You have to be ready for aspects of that sensibility -- for instance, continuing reports on food fashion. Here, we learn about rice vs. potatoes, tiramisu and fruit platters on planes.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | August 4, 1998
LONDON -- Britain has sometimes fancied itself behind the United States in some important categories. These have included empire, which they lost; fashion, which they never had until Princess Diana; and food, which remains terrible. But the British are working hard to surpass the United States in the matter of sex in high places. Prime Minister Tony Blair's Cabinet shake-up has elevated a woman whose sexual history rivals President Clinton's for daring.Margaret Callaghan, the new leader of the House of Lords, has also been named to Mr. Blair's Cabinet as minister for women.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | June 27, 2012
Nora Ephron's collection of essays, "I Remember Nothing," was a memoir about aging, written while it was happening because, she explained, you never know which meal will actually be your last meal. In it, the wry and witty author and filmmaker included a list of the things she would not miss when she died - dry skin, bras, bad dinners "like the one we went to last night," Clarence Thomas and panels on "Women in Film. " And the things she would miss: among them waffles, the concept of waffles, a walk in the park, the concept of a walk in the park, fireworks, Paris, taking a bath and pie. We didn't know it at the time, but Nora Ephron was doing what she always did best - mining her own life and its mundanity to amuse the rest of us. She was battling a form of leukemia at the time, but she kept her illness to herself.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2012
Nora Ephron was really all about the food. An acerbic observer of life whose wit translated so easily to the big screen, she was often as interested in the menu as she was in the script, and her appetite for moviemaking and crab cakes brought her to Baltimore in the early 1990s for the filming of "Sleepless in Seattle. " Ephron, who died Tuesday after a battle with leukemia, was called in to doctor a screenplay about a long-distance love affair between an architect in Seattle (Tom Hanks)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2012
The author and filmmaker Nora Ephron, who died Tuesday night, had a famous love affair with food. Ephron was the maven who knew where to get the best coffee cake, cappuccino and smoked salmon in New York City. She didn't just back into the idea of making the (kind of) Julia Child biopic, "Julia & Julia," her last movie. The movies Ephron made are full of food-love. There's Meg Ryan's "high-maintenance, dressing-on-the-side instructions to waiters in"When Harry Met Sally" -- I just want it the way I want it. " That same movie, of course, is responsible for one of the most famous restaurant scenes in movie history, set in Katz's Delicatessen.  A cookbook writer is the heroine of "Heartburn," the movie version of Ephron's novel into which she threaded some of her own favorite recipes.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | February 28, 2009
Series Color Splash: : A living room is transformed in the Hollywood Regency style. (9 p.m., HGTV) Storytellers:: Kanye West is profiled. (9 p.m., VH1) 48 Hours Mystery: : A family with four children set out to sail around the world and met with catastrophe. (10 p.m., WJZ-Channel 13) Rissi Palmer's Country: : The country singer explores the streets of Chicago and visits blues joints like Rosa's Lounge and Buddy Guy's Legends in the new travel series. (10 p.m., Travel) Movies Cast Away: : Tom Hanks reteamed with director Robert Zemeckis for this 2000 drama about a man stranded by a plane crash on an island for four years.
NEWS
By SUSAN REIMER | September 17, 2006
NORA EPHRON, THE WRITER who gave us When Harry Met Sally and Sleepless in Seattle, has published a collection of essays meant to debunk the New Age myth that menopause is the gateway to a vital and unself-conscious second half of life for women. I never bought that idea -- I don't want to like being 55. I want to be 35. But I know lots of women who did, and they are still waiting for some fairy godmother with unruly gray hair and a moustache, wearing pants with an elastic waistband and comfortable shoes to appear and make all things dewy and new. Ephron, with her smart-aleck New York wit and her Jewish sardonicism, might be the best we can hope for. I Feel Bad About My Neck: And Other Thoughts On Being a Woman (Alfred A. Knopf, 2006, $19.95)
NEWS
By Susan Salter Reynolds and Susan Salter Reynolds,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 27, 2006
I Feel Bad About My Neck and Other Thoughts on Being a Woman Nora Ephron Alfred A. Knopf / 140 pages / $19.95 Maybe she makes you laugh; maybe she bugs you. Maybe you like the movies she wrote or co-wrote (Sleepless in Seattle, When Harry Met Sally, Silkwood, Heartburn) or maybe they're too cute. Maybe her problems seem silly, the petty annoyances of the overprivileged and overeducated. Maybe she seems dated because the age of the unapologetic New Yorker who rarely travels beyond the Hudson is dead, or at least irrelevant.
FEATURES
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,Staff Writer | June 18, 1993
They may be "Sleepless in Seattle," but they were "Eating in Baltimore.""Faidley's was great, and they ended up on the cutting room floor, but it's not their fault, it's mine. . . . And my true loves, at the Woman's Industrial Exchange, we ate there every day and ordered 72 cupcakes a day. . . . The last day, we were filming on the dock at Fells Point . . . and we had just eaten 40 crab cakes and soft shell crabs, and I thought, I could shoot this movie forever."That was Nora Ephron, writer and director of "Sleepless in Seattle," on what it was like eating, er, we mean filming, in Baltimore.
NEWS
By SUSAN REIMER | September 17, 2006
NORA EPHRON, THE WRITER who gave us When Harry Met Sally and Sleepless in Seattle, has published a collection of essays meant to debunk the New Age myth that menopause is the gateway to a vital and unself-conscious second half of life for women. I never bought that idea -- I don't want to like being 55. I want to be 35. But I know lots of women who did, and they are still waiting for some fairy godmother with unruly gray hair and a moustache, wearing pants with an elastic waistband and comfortable shoes to appear and make all things dewy and new. Ephron, with her smart-aleck New York wit and her Jewish sardonicism, might be the best we can hope for. I Feel Bad About My Neck: And Other Thoughts On Being a Woman (Alfred A. Knopf, 2006, $19.95)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,Sun Staff | February 11, 2001
I have a friend who has seen "When Harry Met Sally" so many times she can quote entire monologues from the movie. Another buddy is an absolute pain to see the film with because he will recite each line of every scene -- as it's being said. And then there's the friend who slips the movie into her VCR whenever she's had a bad day at work or an argument with her boyfriend. As for me, I've probably seen "When Harry Met Sally," oh, a mere 40 times since it hit the big screen in 1989. For my friends and many other twentysomethings I've met, writer Nora Ephron's romantic comedy is the quintessential contemporary feel-good relationship movie that somehow still rings true -- which is interesting, considering it was written 15 years ago in the mid-'80s.
FEATURES
By Susan King and Susan King,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 1, 1999
HOLLYWOOD -- In the 1972 film ``Play It Again, Sam,'' Woody Allen's nebbish hero was so obsessed with Humphrey Bogart in ``Casablanca'' that he enlisted the ghost of the legendary '40s tough guy to coach him on how to impress girls.``Casablanca'' and Bogey may have been the role models for Allen's generation, but as director Nora Ephron cleverly illustrates in her latest film, ``You've Got Mail,'' which stars Tom Hanks and Meg Ryan, it's Francis Ford Coppola's Oscar-winning 1972 classic ``The Godfather'' that's become the ultimate guy's movie.
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