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By Bill Bell and Bill Bell,NEW YORK DAILY NEWS | October 20, 1996
To stand in the gardens of the Topkapi Palace, beyond the Gates of Happiness, where turtles with lighted candles on their backs once wandered among tulips for the amusement of sultans, is to know that Istanbul is not just another tour stop.All around, defying history, is an extravagance for the senses. Palaces, mosques, bazaars, castles, tombs, gardens and ruins sing with centuries of romance, folly, intrigue, adventure and excess.Turkey has just gotten the kind of tourism boost that money can't buy: It's where John F. Kennedy Jr. and bride Carolyn Bessette-Kennedy spent the first three days of their honeymoon.
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By William Hyder and William Hyder,Special to The Sun | June 13, 2008
An ancient Roman playwright named Plautus had a great idea for a comedy: A pair of twins are separated as infants. One twin, now grown, travels to a place where, unknown to him, he has a brother. Complications arise when the two are mistaken for one another. Many centuries later, the idea still seemed funny to Shakespeare, so he borrowed it for a play of his own. To "make assurance double sure," as Macbeth once said, he created another pair of twins, also separated at a young age and now working as servants to the first pair.
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By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Theater Critic | February 3, 1993
Shakespeare's "The Comedy of Errors" has been presented as an opera, a circus, a Western, and a Broadway musical. By now, there may be nothing that hasn't been tried. But British director John Retallack, making his American debut at the Shakespeare Theatre, has chosen a clever twist.He has one actor playing each of the comedy's two sets of twins. Philip Goodwin portrays Antipholus of Syracuse and his long-lost brother, Antipholus of Ephesus; and Floyd King portrays their twin servants, Dromio of Syracuse and Dromio of Ephesus.
TRAVEL
By RICHARD O'MARA and RICHARD O'MARA,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 5, 2003
WE MAY BE THE ONLY Americans in Turkey," remarked Eric Tawar, a tourist from New Jersey, as we entered the uncrowded confines of the Library of Celsus, in Ephesus, a 4,000-year-old Greco-Roman city in western Anatolia. He wasn't entirely wrong. Ephesus draws tourists of all nations. Normally, access to the library, which once sheltered thousands of papyrus scrolls, and to the temples, baths and other antique edifices that line the marble-paved streets, requires patience and a little deft elbow work to advance through the crowds.
TRAVEL
By Special to the Sun | August 25, 2002
A Memorable Place A rare glimpse of an ancient church By Gail A. French SPECIAL TO THE SUN When I shared my plans for a trip to Greece and Turkey with my friend, a priest in the Orthodox Church in America, he gave me a list of sacred Orthodox places to visit. I familiarized myself with the list before the trip and planned to show it to my traveling companion en route. When I discovered I had left it at home, I made a new list from memory and I emphasized to my companion that I especially needed to see the church in Ephesus.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | April 13, 2000
What do you get when you combine Shakespeare, Abbott and Costello and the old TV show "Three's Company"? Mobtown Players claim you get "The Comedy of Errors," Shakesare's tale of two sets of twins, separated at birth. The 18-month-old company's modern-dress production opens tomorrow in the upstairs theater at Fell's Point Corner Theatre. Ryan Whinnem directs a cast headed by Bill Garrett and Noel Schively as Antipholus of Ephesus and Antipholus of Syracuse and Lisa Anne Mix and Valarie Perez Schere as their respective servants, both named Dromio.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Theater Critic | May 7, 1993
Collaborators Richard Rodgers, Lorenz Hart and George Abbott bastardized Shakespeare's "Comedy of Errors" to create their 1938 musical, "The Boys From Syracuse." So in theory, there are grounds for some of the liberties director Todd Pearthree takes in the latest production by his Musical Theatre ,, MAchine, in residence at the Spotlighters.One of the first things you notice when you enter the tiny theater is the signs advertising the various shops in ancient Ephesus, where the musical takes place.
FEATURES
By Scott Ponemone | September 22, 1991
A place to draw, that was the goal. After scrambling over marble remains of what was once the mighty Roman seaport of Ephesus, I wanted a drawing that told part of the city's story.The previous day I sat before huge, carved fragments of the Temple of Serapis, an Egyptian cult figure. The jumble of blackened column segments and voluted ears of pale Ionic capitals there moaned in silent dignity. Even the silly blue and yellow faces of wildflowers couldn't break the spell.The cult bespoke of times when Ephesus, lying halfway up modern-day Turkey's Aegean coast, had trading links with much of the known world including Alexandria, Egypt's main grain-exporting city.
TRAVEL
By RICHARD O'MARA and RICHARD O'MARA,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 5, 2003
WE MAY BE THE ONLY Americans in Turkey," remarked Eric Tawar, a tourist from New Jersey, as we entered the uncrowded confines of the Library of Celsus, in Ephesus, a 4,000-year-old Greco-Roman city in western Anatolia. He wasn't entirely wrong. Ephesus draws tourists of all nations. Normally, access to the library, which once sheltered thousands of papyrus scrolls, and to the temples, baths and other antique edifices that line the marble-paved streets, requires patience and a little deft elbow work to advance through the crowds.
NEWS
By William Hyder and William Hyder,Special to The Sun | June 13, 2008
An ancient Roman playwright named Plautus had a great idea for a comedy: A pair of twins are separated as infants. One twin, now grown, travels to a place where, unknown to him, he has a brother. Complications arise when the two are mistaken for one another. Many centuries later, the idea still seemed funny to Shakespeare, so he borrowed it for a play of his own. To "make assurance double sure," as Macbeth once said, he created another pair of twins, also separated at a young age and now working as servants to the first pair.
TRAVEL
By Special to the Sun | August 25, 2002
A Memorable Place A rare glimpse of an ancient church By Gail A. French SPECIAL TO THE SUN When I shared my plans for a trip to Greece and Turkey with my friend, a priest in the Orthodox Church in America, he gave me a list of sacred Orthodox places to visit. I familiarized myself with the list before the trip and planned to show it to my traveling companion en route. When I discovered I had left it at home, I made a new list from memory and I emphasized to my companion that I especially needed to see the church in Ephesus.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | April 13, 2000
What do you get when you combine Shakespeare, Abbott and Costello and the old TV show "Three's Company"? Mobtown Players claim you get "The Comedy of Errors," Shakesare's tale of two sets of twins, separated at birth. The 18-month-old company's modern-dress production opens tomorrow in the upstairs theater at Fell's Point Corner Theatre. Ryan Whinnem directs a cast headed by Bill Garrett and Noel Schively as Antipholus of Ephesus and Antipholus of Syracuse and Lisa Anne Mix and Valarie Perez Schere as their respective servants, both named Dromio.
FEATURES
By Bill Bell and Bill Bell,NEW YORK DAILY NEWS | October 20, 1996
To stand in the gardens of the Topkapi Palace, beyond the Gates of Happiness, where turtles with lighted candles on their backs once wandered among tulips for the amusement of sultans, is to know that Istanbul is not just another tour stop.All around, defying history, is an extravagance for the senses. Palaces, mosques, bazaars, castles, tombs, gardens and ruins sing with centuries of romance, folly, intrigue, adventure and excess.Turkey has just gotten the kind of tourism boost that money can't buy: It's where John F. Kennedy Jr. and bride Carolyn Bessette-Kennedy spent the first three days of their honeymoon.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Theater Critic | May 7, 1993
Collaborators Richard Rodgers, Lorenz Hart and George Abbott bastardized Shakespeare's "Comedy of Errors" to create their 1938 musical, "The Boys From Syracuse." So in theory, there are grounds for some of the liberties director Todd Pearthree takes in the latest production by his Musical Theatre ,, MAchine, in residence at the Spotlighters.One of the first things you notice when you enter the tiny theater is the signs advertising the various shops in ancient Ephesus, where the musical takes place.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Theater Critic | February 3, 1993
Shakespeare's "The Comedy of Errors" has been presented as an opera, a circus, a Western, and a Broadway musical. By now, there may be nothing that hasn't been tried. But British director John Retallack, making his American debut at the Shakespeare Theatre, has chosen a clever twist.He has one actor playing each of the comedy's two sets of twins. Philip Goodwin portrays Antipholus of Syracuse and his long-lost brother, Antipholus of Ephesus; and Floyd King portrays their twin servants, Dromio of Syracuse and Dromio of Ephesus.
FEATURES
By Scott Ponemone | September 22, 1991
A place to draw, that was the goal. After scrambling over marble remains of what was once the mighty Roman seaport of Ephesus, I wanted a drawing that told part of the city's story.The previous day I sat before huge, carved fragments of the Temple of Serapis, an Egyptian cult figure. The jumble of blackened column segments and voluted ears of pale Ionic capitals there moaned in silent dignity. Even the silly blue and yellow faces of wildflowers couldn't break the spell.The cult bespoke of times when Ephesus, lying halfway up modern-day Turkey's Aegean coast, had trading links with much of the known world including Alexandria, Egypt's main grain-exporting city.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | February 25, 2001
"Fragments, The Collected Wisdom of Heraclitus," translated by Brooks Haxton (Viking, 99 pages, $19.95). A bit more than 2,500 years ago, Heraclitus of Ephesus wrote "On Nature," generally accepted to have been the Western world's first coherent, encompassing philosophical treatise -- an inspiration to Plato, Aristotle and other followers. Its full text long has been lost, but its surviving fragments are celebrated. This is a new and startlingly fresh translation by a significant poet.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, Special to The Baltimore Sun | August 2, 2012
It was evident from watching Annapolis Shakespeare Company's director and cast members rehearse Shakespeare's "The Comedy of Errors" that this young company is making astonishing strides - not small steps, but artful leaps. It was also clear that the show's opening would be a lively comic treat. Last year, I reported on ASC's progress from a small workshop taught by Sally Boyett-D'Angelo in summer 2009 into a thriving young company that had already become a full member of the county's established nonprofit performing-arts community.
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