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Ephedrine

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NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,Special to the Sun; King Features Syndicate | February 6, 2000
Q.Many of the new "natural" diet pills have ephedrine as an ingredient. My husband has been told he should lose weight to lower his blood pressure, so he is taking a formula that contains ephedrine. Is this compound really safe? A. Ephedrine is one of the main components of the Chinese herb known as ma huang. Losing weight is one of the best ways to lower blood pressure without relying on medication, but the pills your husband is taking might make matters worse. Either the herb ma huang (Ephedra sinica)
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SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,Sun Reporter | October 25, 2006
Neither Shawne Merriman's appeal nor his apology is likely to reverse a four-game suspension for violating the NFL's steroid policy. The league's bottom line on drugs is that players are held accountable for everything that's in their bodies. They are presented with lists of banned substances and products, and can consult with team physicians and trainers. The San Diego Chargers linebacker's appeal is based on inadvertently taking a supplement tainted with a banned substance. Since the NFL began disciplining players for steroids usage in 1989, it has suspended 57 active players.
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SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | March 7, 2003
VERO BEACH, Fla. - Two weeks into his annual information tour through spring training camps, Major League Baseball Players Association director Donald Fehr is still playing defense. Baseball owners have used the heatstroke death of Orioles pitcher Steve Bechler to justify a new effort to restrict the use of products that contain the weight-loss aid and stimulant ephedrine. The Senate, which held hearings last June to examine claims of widespread steroid use in Major League Baseball, is pondering a new inquiry to take a similar look at the way professional sports deals with ephedrine and other potentially harmful legal supplements.
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | January 25, 2004
President Bush drew widespread praise from every corner of the sports world for the high-minded stand he took against steroids and other performance-enhancing drugs in his State of the Union speech Tuesday night. Maybe now would be a good time for Bush and a lot of other politicians to take responsibility for the role they played in the proliferation of risky performance-enhancing supplements that flooded the sports market after the supplement industry was deregulated in 1994. If somebody had taken a stand back then, when the bipartisan Dietary Supplement and Health Education Act passed through Congress and made it much easier for companies to pass "natural" products under the radar of the Food and Drug Administration, perhaps Orioles pitcher Steve Bechler never would have had access to the ephedra-based diet aid that doctors say contributed to his death last February.
NEWS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | February 20, 2003
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. - It's a stimulant. It's a weight-loss product. It's a cold and asthma medication. It also might be a killer. Ephedrine, the active ingredient in the herbal stimulant ephedra, is in the news again this week after the heatstroke death of 23-year-old Orioles pitcher Steve Bechler. The drug is sold - often combined with caffeine - over the counter at health food and supplement stores under brands that promote its ability to burn off fat and give an athlete that extra boost of energy.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | March 13, 2003
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. -- If there is any mystery remaining three weeks after the heatstroke death of Orioles pitcher Steve Bechler, it likely will be explained this afternoon when the Broward County medical examiner, Dr. Joshua Perper, releases the final toxicology report and microscopic tissue analysis from the Feb. 19 autopsy. The toxicology report is expected to confirm Bechler ingested the controversial weight-loss aid and stimulant ephedrine before he collapsed at the Orioles' spring training complex on Feb. 16 and died the next day. The tissue analysis also could reveal factors that may have contributed to the death.
FEATURES
By Gina Kolata and Gina Kolata,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 30, 1996
Some people assume that what is natural is good for you, or at least harmless. That assumption, as it turns out, is a great marketing ploy but a dangerous motto for living.So far, at least 15 people have died in the United States after taking herbal products containing ephedrine, also known as ephedra or ma huang. And yet, this herbal drug is still on the market along with other untested herbs and so-called food supplements, including vitamins, amino acids, melatonin and "natural" birth control pills made from yams.
SPORTS
By Brent Jones and Brent Jones,SUN STAFF | December 6, 2002
The NFL upheld Ravens receiver Javin Hunter's four-game suspension yesterday for violating the league's policy on banned substances. Hunter, who started in Sunday's 27-23 win over the Cincinnati Bengals, will miss the remainder of the regular season, is banned from the training facility and can't attend team functions. The Ravens signed cornerback Tom Knight, a first-round pick in 1997 who started eight games for the Arizona Cardinals last season, to a two-year contract to fill Hunter's spot.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | March 14, 2003
DAVIE, Fla. - Orioles pitcher Steve Bechler had a considerable amount of ephedrine in his blood when he collapsed and died of heatstroke, according to the toxicology report released yesterday by Broward County medical examiner Dr. Joshua Perper. Perper said the concentration of ephedrine found in the blood sample taken before Bechler's death was consistent with reports that he had ingested three capsules of the weight-loss aid and stimulant Xenadrine. The results confirmed the preliminary report of the medical examiner, who concluded Feb. 19 that ephedrine had been a factor in the death.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | February 27, 2003
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. - Major League Baseball took another big step this week toward industry-wide restrictions on the use of ephedrine-based products by banning the use of the herbal supplement throughout the minor leagues. The ban, which was implemented Monday and has been transmitted to the 30 major-league front offices over the past two days, covers all minor- league players not on 40-man major-league rosters. Players on 40-man rosters are governed by Major League Baseball's collective bargaining agreement, which does not include restrictions on the substance cited as a contributing factor in the Feb. 17 heatstroke death of 23-year-old Orioles pitcher Steve Bechler.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | March 14, 2003
DAVIE, Fla. - Orioles pitcher Steve Bechler had a considerable amount of ephedrine in his blood when he collapsed and died of heatstroke, according to the toxicology report released yesterday by Broward County medical examiner Dr. Joshua Perper. Perper said the concentration of ephedrine found in the blood sample taken before Bechler's death was consistent with reports that he had ingested three capsules of the weight-loss aid and stimulant Xenadrine. The results confirmed the preliminary report of the medical examiner, who concluded Feb. 19 that ephedrine had been a factor in the death.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | March 13, 2003
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. -- If there is any mystery remaining three weeks after the heatstroke death of Orioles pitcher Steve Bechler, it likely will be explained this afternoon when the Broward County medical examiner, Dr. Joshua Perper, releases the final toxicology report and microscopic tissue analysis from the Feb. 19 autopsy. The toxicology report is expected to confirm Bechler ingested the controversial weight-loss aid and stimulant ephedrine before he collapsed at the Orioles' spring training complex on Feb. 16 and died the next day. The tissue analysis also could reveal factors that may have contributed to the death.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | March 7, 2003
VERO BEACH, Fla. - Two weeks into his annual information tour through spring training camps, Major League Baseball Players Association director Donald Fehr is still playing defense. Baseball owners have used the heatstroke death of Orioles pitcher Steve Bechler to justify a new effort to restrict the use of products that contain the weight-loss aid and stimulant ephedrine. The Senate, which held hearings last June to examine claims of widespread steroid use in Major League Baseball, is pondering a new inquiry to take a similar look at the way professional sports deals with ephedrine and other potentially harmful legal supplements.
NEWS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | March 1, 2003
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. - Manufacturers of products containing ephedra could be forced to warn consumers that the herbal weight-loss aid and stimulant might cause heart attacks, strokes and death. The Food and Drug Administration announced in Washington yesterday that strongly worded warning labels could be on bottles of the popular capsules within a few months, pending public hearings. The agency left open the possibility that it will seek greater restrictions on the over-the-counter supplement.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | February 28, 2003
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. - North Dakota Sen. Byron Dorgan helped push Major League Baseball toward a program to discourage the use of anabolic steroids last summer. Now, he's focusing on ephedrine. The ranking Democrat on the Senate Consumer Affairs Subcommittee that oversees professional sports recently called for hearings to examine the widespread use of ephedrine-based products among professional athletes. If Dorgan has his way, baseball commissioner Bud Selig and Major League Baseball Players Association director Donald Fehr will be summoned to Washington to explain why there are no major-league restrictions on the herbal stimulant and weight-loss aid that apparently contributed to the heatstroke death of Orioles pitcher Steve Bechler.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | February 27, 2003
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. - Major League Baseball took another big step this week toward industry-wide restrictions on the use of ephedrine-based products by banning the use of the herbal supplement throughout the minor leagues. The ban, which was implemented Monday and has been transmitted to the 30 major-league front offices over the past two days, covers all minor- league players not on 40-man major-league rosters. Players on 40-man rosters are governed by Major League Baseball's collective bargaining agreement, which does not include restrictions on the substance cited as a contributing factor in the Feb. 17 heatstroke death of 23-year-old Orioles pitcher Steve Bechler.
SPORTS
By Joe Christensen and Roch Kubatko and Joe Christensen and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | February 20, 2003
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. - With paramedics working desperately inside the training room Sunday to try to save Steve Bechler's life, Orioles pitcher Matt Riley recognized a bottle of Xenadrine RFA-1 from Bechler's locker and threw it in the trash. Riley knew Xenadrine was legal, but he knew the team frowned upon its use, and something told him to protect his good friend's reputation just in case. "I don't know who got the bottle, but it was in the training room, and they handed it to me," Riley said yesterday.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | February 19, 2003
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. - The autopsy performed yesterday on Orioles pitcher Steve Bechler uncovered several factors that contributed to his death from heatstroke, but Broward County medical examiner Dr. Joshua Perper placed significant blame on a weight-loss drug containing ephedrine. Perper reported that Bechler was suffering from moderate hypertension and found some evidence of liver dysfunction. The 23-year-old pitcher also had little food in his digestive system, which caused the medical examiner to conclude that he had been on a strict diet.
SPORTS
By Joe Christensen and Joe Christensen,SUN STAFF | February 27, 2003
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. - On the wall outside his office, the medical examiner who performed Steve Bechler's autopsy has an inscription hanging inside a frame. It reads: "Let conversation cease. Let laughter flee. This is the place where death delights to help the living." Dr. Joshua Perper is a Romanian-born man with Baltimore ties who now serves as Broward County's chief medical examiner. For him, there's a point to all this talk about what caused Bechler - a 23-year-old Orioles pitching prospect - to collapse during practice and die of heatstroke.
SPORTS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,SUN STAFF | February 26, 2003
The widow of Steve Bechler, the Oriole who suffered fatal heatstroke last week at spring training, plans to sue the maker of the weight-loss supplement her husband used - a strategy that experts say holds the best hope to obtain benefits beyond baseball's standard life insurance. A lawsuit against the team, a tactic being pursued by the widow of an NFL player who died under similar circumstances in 2001, is a far more difficult case to make. Workers' compensation laws shield employers from liability for most on-the-job deaths.
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