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By Julie Deardorff and Julie Deardorff,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | December 7, 2003
CHICAGO - Searching for a legal way to speed up her metabolism and burn fat, Chicago fitness competitor Beth Horn, 29, turned to an ephedra-free supplement. Though she found the effects less potent than with ephedra, she didn't get the adrenaline kick she wanted for her intense workouts. "Without ephedra, it's just caffeine to get you going," said Horn. "I don't think it's enough." Six months after Illinois led the nation by banning the sale of supplements containing the herb ephedra, new products are promising better results.
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NEWS
By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | April 15, 2005
A U.S. District judge has ruled that the Food and Drug Administration went too far by banning all products that contain the dietary supplement ephedra. The ruling, signed Wednesday by Judge Tena Campbell in Utah, undercut the FDA's latest foray into regulating dietary supplements - products containing natural ingredients classified under the law as more like food than drugs. Although the court provided what experts said was a clear rebuke to the agency, the immediate effect is likely to be minimal.
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BUSINESS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | June 2, 1997
One ingredient is a Chinese medicinal herb that has been used for 5,000 years to treat asthma.The other is an herb used as a substitute for the anti-depressant Prozac.Taken together, they are the latest thing in weight-loss drugs.The combination of ephedra and Saint-John's-wort entered the competition for dieters' dollars recently, when Horsham, Pa., weight-loss chain Nutri/System Inc. began selling the herb combination in tablet form in its 500 diet centers nationwide.Because the ingredients apparently mimic the action of the popular prescription diet-drug combination phentermine/fenfluramine, the new product is called Herbal Phen/Fen.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 13, 2004
NEWARK, N.J. - A federal judge cleared the way yesterday for a ban on the sale or manufacture of ephedra to start immediately. The judge denied a request by two manufacturers of the dietary supplement to delay the ban pending the outcome of a lawsuit. The manufacturers have sued the Food and Drug Administration and the Department of Health and Human Services. Judge Joel A. Pisano of U.S. District Court in Newark ruled that NVE Pharmaceuticals of Andover, N.J., manufacturer of Stacker 2, and the National Institute for Clinical Weight Loss of Birmingham, Ala., manufacturer of Thermalean, had not met the standards for a temporary restraining order.
FEATURES
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon, Ph.D. and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon, Ph.D.,SPECIAL TO THE SUN King Features Syndicate | September 9, 1997
I've seen ads lately for Nasalcrom, now available over the counter.Let me tell you why I worry about this.My doctor prescribed Nasalcrom for allergy symptoms several years ago. It relieved my sneezing and congestion, but after a few months I realized I could no longer smell certain scents.My doctor had never heard of that side effect. I stopped using Nasalcrom but have never regained full use of my sense of smell.I can no longer smell certain flowers nor tell what herbs and spices were used in a dish.
NEWS
By Steve Chapman | March 4, 2003
CHICAGO - Thousands of people die every year from overdoses of drugs such as heroin and cocaine, which is an intolerable state of affairs. So here's an idea: Let's outlaw heroin and cocaine. Whoops. We already did that, didn't we? And people kept snorting, smoking or injecting them anyway, despite the risks. Prohibiting a substance is not a cure-all. That's worth remembering when politicians demand that the federal government and Major League Baseball ban ephedra, the herbal stimulant blamed for the death of Orioles pitcher Steve Bechler.
SPORTS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,SUN STAFF | February 19, 2003
Health advocates have been calling on the federal government for more than a year to ban dietary supplements containing ephedra alkaloids, the herbal compounds that may have played a role in the death Monday of Orioles pitching prospect Steve Bechler. "The government's failure to ban products containing ephedrine showed extraordinary political cowardice," Dr. Sidney M. Wolfe, director of the Public Citizen Health Research Group, said yesterday. "There are more reports of deaths, heart attacks, seizures and dangerous effect from these products than from all other dietary supplements combined."
SPORTS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 9, 2003
VIERA, Fla. - Having intensified its warning to players about the use of products containing ephedra, the baseball players union is not prepared at the moment to take the next step and agree to a ban on ephedra, the union's executive director said yesterday. Donald Fehr reiterated that the union would await two developments before considering a next step: further potential action by the Food and Drug Administration and a toxicology report from the autopsy of Orioles pitcher Steve Bechler.
SPORTS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,SUN STAFF | February 21, 2003
Representatives of the makers of an herbal supplement linked to the death of Orioles prospect Steve Bechler fought back yesterday against allegations that the supplement - ephedra - contributed to his fatal heatstroke. Bechler, 23, died Monday after collapsing during workouts the day before at Orioles spring training camp in Fort Lauderdale, Fla. Pills of a product containing ephedra were found in his locker, and the local medical examiner said the substance almost certainly played a role in the death and should be banned by Major League Baseball.
SPORTS
By NEW YORK DAILY NEWS | February 23, 2003
TAMPA, Fla. - The heart palpitations started on a Sunday night in March 1996 as David Wells sat in his hotel room after a day of spring training workouts with the Orioles. When Wells arrived at Fort Lauderdale Stadium for work the next morning, his heart was still speeding. By that afternoon, Wells was admitted to Holy Cross Hospital, intravenous tubes in his arms, his heart pounding and his mind racing. At one point, doctors measured his heartbeat at nearly 200 beats per minute. Wells had an irregular heartbeat, the doctors told him, and they recommended stopping his heart, then starting it again by shocking it with a defibrillator.
NEWS
By Julie Bell and Bill Atkinson and Julie Bell and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | December 31, 2003
The Food and Drug Administration is moving to ban the weight-loss supplement ephedra, saying a comprehensive review has shown it's too dangerous to remain on the market. The action, announced yesterday, came 10 months after the ephedra-related death of Baltimore Orioles pitcher Steve Bechler and six years after the FDA first proposed regulating the natural stimulant, which constricts the blood vessels, speeds up the heart and can raise body temperature. It will mark the first time the agency has banned a dietary supplement under authority given to it in a decade-old law. Mike Flanagan, the Orioles' vice president of baseball operations, was among those who welcomed the move, although Public Citizen's Health Research Group criticized it as too late for 155 ephedra users who have died over the years.
NEWS
By Julie Deardorff and Julie Deardorff,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | December 7, 2003
CHICAGO - Searching for a legal way to speed up her metabolism and burn fat, Chicago fitness competitor Beth Horn, 29, turned to an ephedra-free supplement. Though she found the effects less potent than with ephedra, she didn't get the adrenaline kick she wanted for her intense workouts. "Without ephedra, it's just caffeine to get you going," said Horn. "I don't think it's enough." Six months after Illinois led the nation by banning the sale of supplements containing the herb ephedra, new products are promising better results.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | December 3, 2003
The company that makes the controversial ephedra-based diet supplement Xenadrine RFA-1 has filed a motion to include the Orioles as a third-party defendant in the $600 million lawsuit brought by the widow of Orioles pitcher Steve Bechler. Nutraquest, formerly known as Cytodyne Industries, hopes to establish that the team was responsible for Bechler's death from heatstroke, though Broward County (Fla.) medical examiner Joshua Perper pointed to his ingestion of three Xenadrine capsules before a spring training workout as one of the major contributing factors in the tragedy.
SPORTS
By Joe Christensen and Joe Christensen,SUN STAFF | November 4, 2003
New York yesterday became the second state to ban over-the-counter sales of ephedra, the herbal supplement that has been linked to the death of Orioles pitching prospect Steve Bechler. Orioles vice president Mike Flanagan was in New York City to see Gov. George E. Pataki sign the bill into law. From now on, each sale of the supplement in that state will be subject to a $500 fine. Illinois was the first state to pass such a measure, and Flanagan said he hopes Maryland and other states will soon follow suit.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | July 18, 2003
The widow of Orioles pitcher Steve Bechler has filed a $600 million lawsuit against the maker of the ephedra-based diet drug and stimulant that was in his system when he died of heatstroke in February. New York attorney David Meiselman, representing Kiley Bechler, filed the suit Wednesday against Cytodyne Technologies, the company that produces Xenadrine RFA-1, and named New York-based manufacturer Phoenix Laboratories and Cytodyne president Robert Chinery as codefendants. The suit alleges the controversial nutritional supplement was directly responsible for Bechler's collapse during a spring training workout at the Orioles' training facility in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., on Feb. 16. Bechler lost consciousness and his body temperature rose to 108 degrees, causing his major organs to fail.
SPORTS
By Joe Christensen and Joe Christensen,SUN STAFF | June 11, 2003
Orioles vice president of baseball operations Mike Flanagan spoke on the dangers of ephedra yesterday in Albany, N.Y., where the New York State Senate is expected to act this week on legislation to ban over-the-counter sales of the dietary supplement linked to the death of Orioles pitching prospect Steve Bechler. Illinois has already banned over-the-counter sales of ephedra, and New York State Senator Charles Fuschillo introduced a bill that would make New York the second state to take such measures.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 13, 2004
NEWARK, N.J. - A federal judge cleared the way yesterday for a ban on the sale or manufacture of ephedra to start immediately. The judge denied a request by two manufacturers of the dietary supplement to delay the ban pending the outcome of a lawsuit. The manufacturers have sued the Food and Drug Administration and the Department of Health and Human Services. Judge Joel A. Pisano of U.S. District Court in Newark ruled that NVE Pharmaceuticals of Andover, N.J., manufacturer of Stacker 2, and the National Institute for Clinical Weight Loss of Birmingham, Ala., manufacturer of Thermalean, had not met the standards for a temporary restraining order.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | July 18, 2003
The widow of Orioles pitcher Steve Bechler has filed a $600 million lawsuit against the maker of the ephedra-based diet drug and stimulant that was in his system when he died of heatstroke in February. New York attorney David Meiselman, representing Kiley Bechler, filed the suit Wednesday against Cytodyne Technologies, the company that produces Xenadrine RFA-1, and named New York-based manufacturer Phoenix Laboratories and Cytodyne president Robert Chinery as codefendants. The suit alleges the controversial nutritional supplement was directly responsible for Bechler's collapse during a spring training workout at the Orioles' training facility in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., on Feb. 16. Bechler lost consciousness and his body temperature rose to 108 degrees, causing his major organs to fail.
SPORTS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 9, 2003
VIERA, Fla. - Having intensified its warning to players about the use of products containing ephedra, the baseball players union is not prepared at the moment to take the next step and agree to a ban on ephedra, the union's executive director said yesterday. Donald Fehr reiterated that the union would await two developments before considering a next step: further potential action by the Food and Drug Administration and a toxicology report from the autopsy of Orioles pitcher Steve Bechler.
NEWS
By Steve Chapman | March 4, 2003
CHICAGO - Thousands of people die every year from overdoses of drugs such as heroin and cocaine, which is an intolerable state of affairs. So here's an idea: Let's outlaw heroin and cocaine. Whoops. We already did that, didn't we? And people kept snorting, smoking or injecting them anyway, despite the risks. Prohibiting a substance is not a cure-all. That's worth remembering when politicians demand that the federal government and Major League Baseball ban ephedra, the herbal stimulant blamed for the death of Orioles pitcher Steve Bechler.
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