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NEWS
January 11, 2011
The publication of the American Farm Bureau's response to the Environmental Protection Agency's plans to set a strict "pollution diet" for the Chesapeake Bay ( "Farmers group sues to block Chesapeake Bay cleanup plan," Jan. 9) provides us with an important opportunity to open up the dialogue between farmers, conservationists and policy makers. Last month, the Accokeek Foundation hosted a conference titled "Common Ground: Growing Agriculture, Restoring the Bay," in which these groups explored ways that profitability and environmental stewardship can go hand in hand.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 31, 2014
Dr. Michael Beer, former chairman of the department of biophysics at the Johns Hopkins University who was an environmentalist who worked diligently to clean up and protect Stony Run and the Jones Falls, died Aug. 22. He was 88. Dr. Beer was dining with his companion, Patricia Laidlaw, at her Roland Park home when he was stricken with a heart attack. He was taken to Union Memorial, where he was pronounced dead, said his daughter, Suzanne C. Beer of Middle River. "In the early days of molecular microscopy he was one of the key figures," said Dr. Bertrand Garcia-Moreno, chairman of the department of biophysics at the Johns Hopkins University.
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NEWS
April 2, 2010
Will the environmentalists who object to offshore oil drilling come fill up my gas tank when gas is $8 per gallon ("Black gold or fool's gold?" April 1)? Of course not, they have cushy, all-expenses-paid jobs, grant money they can squander protesting anyplace that has good food and travel, or they're simply blind, pampered individuals who have never had to hold an accountable job in their lives. In order to get off of Middle East oil, we have to send a message to the rich arrogant sheiks who could care less and to our own nation that we are using the God given resources and that it's time for a change.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2014
The Obama administration took a step closer Friday to allowing oil and gas exploration off the Mid-Atlantic and South Atlantic coasts, drawing praise from the energy industry and criticism from environmentalists. The Interior Department's Bureau of Ocean Energy Management approved a framework for doing seismic testing from the Delaware Bay to mid-Florida and up to 400 miles offshore. The decision sets the stage for federal officials to begin issuing permits for surveying an area roughly the size of California.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Staff Writer | December 1, 1993
A group of Anne Arundel County voters concerned about environmental issues is forming a political action committee to endorse candidates in next year's county elections.Organizers of the PAC, tentatively named Anne Arundel Voters for Environmental Justice, will help identify, endorse and work for candidates who support environmental issues, said Joan Willey, regional representative of the Sierra Club and one of the organizers."We want to make sure people who run for these seats represent the majority of the people in these districts," Ms. Willey said.
NEWS
By Howard Libit | October 19, 2002
The Maryland League of Conservation Voters began airing a television advertisement on the environmental record of Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. this week. The league is the third independent group to purchase television ads during the gubernatorial campaign, and the ad is airing on Montgomery County cable television stations. What the ad says: The 30-second spot opens with a blank chalkboard. "To most of us, Robert Ehrlich is a blank slate," an announcer says. "That's why you should know Ehrlich voted against lowering arsenic levels in our drinking water, opposed tougher smog and air-pollution health standards, voted to force taxpayers - not polluters - to pay for cleanup of toxic waste sites and to weak enforcement of the laws that protect our air and water," the announcer says.
FEATURES
By Mary Corey and Mary Corey,Staff Writer | April 29, 1992
When Peggy Reigle checked out of corporate America, she thought she was leaving days of faxing and phone calls in her office at the New York Daily News.She thought wrong. Instead, amid the osprey nests and duck ponds of her Eastern Shore farm, she found a battle of a different sort: Peggy Reigle took on those who saw fit to reclassify more than 20 acres of her property as wetlands -- after she had bought it.The villains, as she sees it, are environmentalists."I'm a devout conservationist, but I would never use the word environmentalist.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | January 15, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Millions of top-secret spy satellite photographs will be released under an order President Clinton is expected to sign in coming weeks, providing an information windfall that could help determine the extent to which oceans are fouled, deserts are expanding and rain forests are disappearing.If Mr. Clinton approves the long-standing but controversial proposal, the government will declassify all the satellite photographs taken from 1960 to 1972 and provide scientists with an unprecedented historical record of what the Earth looked like 35 years ago.The photographs were taken by six generations of early spy satellites, starting with the still secret Keyhole 1, an Air Force satellite.
NEWS
By Peter Honey and Peter Honey,Washington Bureau | February 20, 1993
WASHINGTON -- A "green" White House poses a dilemma for environmental activists accustomed to confrontation during 12 years of Republican rule they saw as hostile or uncommitted to their cause.For the first time since the Carter presidency, top administration officials are consulting environmentalists of all stripes on questions of economic, domestic and even foreign policy.Several were summoned to the White House in recent few weeks to give recommendations on environmental initiatives like the energy tax that President Clinton outlined in his first address to a joint session of Congress on Wednesday -- granting them a level of access they never got during the presidencies of Ronald Reagan and George Bush.
NEWS
September 7, 1996
GOV. PARRIS N. GLENDENING wants to use a big carrot. Environmentalists prefer a big stick. That is the crux of the difference between the governor, who has been emphasizing a redirection of suburban growth patterns, and environmental leaders, who fear the governor is not being authoritative enough.The environmentalists hearken back to Gov. Marvin Mandel's 1973 warning to Marylanders about the ecological costs of sprawl. Indeed, we've lost nearly 80 percent of bay wetlands as development has gobbled up farmland and open space for subdivisions, shopping centers and highways farther from the cities.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | June 16, 2014
Government officials involved in the multistate Chesapeake Bay cleanup pledged Monday to broaden and accelerate the long-running effort, including a vow to address the impacts of climate change on the ailing estuary. Governors of Maryland, Pennsylvania, Virginia and Delaware signed a new bay restoration agreement in Annapolis, which for the first time formally encompasses "upstream" states with smaller slices of the 64,000-square-mile watershed, including New York and West Virginia.
FEATURES
By Tim Wheeler and The Baltimore Sun | May 6, 2014
Maryland and the rest of the Northeast face more heat waves and smog, heavier downpours and storm-driven flooding that could damage Baltimore's port, according to a new report released by the Obama administration. The third   National Climate Assessment , drawing on new research findings over the past four years, concludes that climate change is already occurring, impacting virtually every region and key sectors of the U.S. economy. The White House and environmental groups said the assessment underscores the need to do more to curtail climate-altering emissions, while also preparing to adapt to the unavoidable impacts of changes already under way. The report comes at a time when the Obama administration faces growing political pressure over the Keystone XL pipeline, with   Congress   considering approving it after the administration delayed its decision on the project amid intense opposition from environmentalists.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | April 10, 2014
A top Environmental Protection Agenc y official visited Baltimore Thursday to make the case for a new federal rule spelling out what streams and wetlands enjoy legal protection from development or disturbance. Nancy K. Stoner, acting assistant EPA administrator for water, joined activists from Environment Maryland at Fells Point to defend the recently proposed "Waters of the U.S. " rule, which has come under fire from home builders, farmers and other industry groups. Stoner said the EPA and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineer s jointly drafted the rule, which she said was meant to clear up legal confusion left by a pair of Supreme Court decisions about when landowners need federal permits to disturb streams and wetlands.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | February 9, 2014
As money begins flowing into Anne Arundel County government from its new stormwater fees, Erik Michelsen says he wants to make sure it's spent on projects to reduce pollution harming the Chesapeake Bay. County Executive Laura Neuman recently tapped Michelsen, a local environmentalist, to run the county's stormwater management program, which is expected to spend tens of millions of dollars each year. Michelsen moves to the new position from the nonprofit South River Federation in Edgewater, where he's been executive director for the past five years.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | January 30, 2014
Environmentalists are slamming a new draft Chesapeake Bay restoration agreement for failing to address toxic pollution or even mention climate change as a complicating factor in the three-decade effort to revive the ailing estuary. The Chesapeake Bay Program , a "partnership" of the Environmental Protection Agency and the six states that drain into the bay - including Maryland - released Wednesday a draft agreement "to guide the next chapter of restoration across the watershed.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | December 24, 2013
Baltimore city , Baltimore County and Prince George's County have been directed by the state to step up their efforts to reduce polluted runoff fouling local streams and the Chesapeake Bay. But environmental groups contend the mandates are too vague and weak, raising the possibility they may go to court to challenge them. The Maryland Department of the Environment ordered the three large jurisdictions to take a variety of similar actions over the next five years to curtail storm-water pollution, including reducing litter in water ways and retrofitting 20 percent of their streets, parking lots and buildings to catch or treat runoff.
NEWS
By Alice Lukens and Alice Lukens,SUN STAFF | February 26, 1999
At the first environmental committee meeting for the proposed Patapsco Heritage Greenway, 15 environmentalists agreed to recommend that the state Department of Natural Resources do more research before building a 1.2-mile, 10-foot-wide paved trail on the Baltimore County side of the Patapsco River."
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | April 23, 2006
SAN JOSE, Calif. -- Yesterday was Earth Day, a time when Americans celebrate the environment and debate changes in the way to protect it. But the real news could be what hasn't changed. Despite relentless rhetoric from environmentalists and industry that the Bush administration has shifted the balance from tight regulation toward a more business-friendly approach, in reality, the president and his supporters have been unable to significantly rewrite America's landmark environmental laws, even though Republicans have controlled all branches of government for more than five years.
NEWS
By Dee Hodges | July 4, 2013
Dozens of Maryland taxes have been increased during the six years that Martin O'Malley has been governor, but perhaps none better epitomizes the state's propensity to raise taxes for the sake of it than the stormwater management fees - better known as the "rain tax" - that went into effect for residents of the state's 10 largest counties and Baltimore City on Monday. The idea is to lower Maryland's stormwater runoff into the Chesapeake Bay as required by the Environmental Protection Agency as part of its bay cleanup plan.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 28, 2013
James H. Eacker, a retired Rouse Co. executive who was active in environmental issues, died June 8 of heart failure at Howard County General Hospital. He was 79. The son of the former president of Boston Gas & Electric Co. and a homemaker, he was born and raised in Cambridge, Mass. After graduating from Deerfield Academy, he earned a bachelor's degree in 1955 in business and engineering management from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He earned a master's degree in business, also from MIT, in 1958.
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