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By JOSH MITCHELL and JOSH MITCHELL,SUN REPORTER | May 31, 2006
Looking to crack down on environmental violations during home construction, Baltimore County government officials are moving to assess fines more quickly. The county issues hundreds of citations a year to property owners who build homes on wetlands, damage streambeds or knock down protected trees. Most of the problems are corrected, but for the rest, the county must take the violators to District Court to issue a fine, a process that can take months. A bill scheduled to be introduced at Monday's County Council meeting would empower a county hearing officer to review the citations and determine fines.
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Tim Wheeler | September 21, 2012
Would putting more polluters behind bars help restore the Chesapeake Bay? The Center for Progressive Reform believes it would. In a new report, theĀ  a pro-regulatory think tank argues that both state and federal authorities prosecute water polluters too rarely in Maryland and that the state penalties for conviction aren't stiff enough to deter violators. Criminal prosecutions are an effective way to improve enforcement of environmental laws, especially when government regulators lack the funds to adequately inspect all potential polluters, says Rena Steinzor, the center's president and a professor at the University of Maryland's law school.
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NEWS
By JOSH MITCHELL and JOSH MITCHELL,SUN REPORTER | July 4, 2006
Owners of commercial buildings that meet a standard for energy efficiency will receive a tax credit under legislation approved by the Baltimore County Council last night. The council also set up a hearing process for people accused of environmental violations and banned the parking of recreational vehicles on residential streets. All three measures passed by 6-0 votes, with Republican Councilman T. Bryan McIntire absent. The tax credit would be as much as 100 percent of a property tax bill and applies to so-called "green" buildings, which are designed to conserve energy and have a minimal impact on the environment.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | February 5, 2012
An Anne Arundel County waterfront landowner and a contractor accused of doing work without a permit have been hit with financial penalties and probation in the first two cases brought under the county's aggressive new environmental enforcement strategy. County officials and prosecutors say they will continue to go beyond traditional enforcement measures, using civil and criminal penalties to protect the Chesapeake Bay and its tributaries from serious violations. "The stakes have gone up dramatically," said Joseph F. Devlin, one of the attorneys for Emanuel Krousaniotakis, the owner of waterfront property outside Annapolis.
NEWS
By Gary Cohn and Gary Cohn,SUN STAFF | June 5, 1998
After hearing testimony from government and maritime industry executives, the chairman of a congressional subcommittee said yesterday that he was concerned that the Defense Department's plans to reform its troubled ship-scrapping program do not go far enough."
NEWS
By Gary Cohn and Gary Cohn,SUN STAFF | June 26, 1998
In a crucial step in the effort to reform the government's troubled ship-scrapping program, the Senate passed legislation last night setting up a pilot project to test new ways of dismantling obsolete Navy vessels in the United States.The pilot project was approved as an amendment to the Department of Defense authorization bill, but still faces hurdles before the program could go into effect.The legislation would require the Navy to subsidize the disposal of its old ships instead of trying to make money from them.
NEWS
By Gary Cohn and Gary Cohn,SUN STAFF | February 14, 1998
Kerry L. Ellis, the local businessman convicted of exposing workers to asbestos and of dumping oil and debris into the harbor while scrapping the USS Coral Sea in Baltimore, was sentenced yesterday to two years in prison.In sentencing Ellis, U.S. District Judge William M. Nickerson harshly criticized the Navy for failing to ensure that shipbreakers such as Ellis adhere to safety and environmental laws while dismantling obsolete warships such as the Coral Sea."There is from my perspective the added complicity of the Navy and its lack of controls in general - a hands-off policy with regard to shipbreaking," Nickerson said.
NEWS
May 20, 1993
The shoes keep dropping at Aberdeen Proving Ground, wit new charges of mismanagement of environmental programs and cleanup of old pollution dump sites.A three-month internal investigation this year at the Army weapons testing facility confirmed repeated violations of erosion and sediment control violations, unsafe storage of lawn chemicals at the golf course and leaking underground petroleum storage tanks.The thrust of this report, ordered by Maj. Gen. Richard W. Tragemann, is that his command needs (surprise!
NEWS
January 20, 1994
The $140,000 in fines levied against Aberdeen Proving Ground for environmental violations in handling toxic wastes won't make much difference to taxpayers, who will pay the Army's fines and get the money back in the treasury.But that line item in the Proving Ground's budget will emphasize to the public that mismanagement of dangerous wastes is an ongoing problem at the Harford County post that has not faded despite five years of high-level talk and tens of millions of dollars for remediation.
NEWS
By Gary Cohn and Gary Cohn,SUN STAFF | March 19, 1998
WASHINGTON -- After hearing testimony about how the shipbreaking industry harms workers and pollutes the nation's waters, the chairman of a congressional subcommittee said the government's troubled ship-scrapping program needs a complete overhaul.Rep. Wayne T. Gilchrest, a Maryland Republican, suggested that new laws may be required to force reforms."It appears that there needs to be a fundamental change," said Gilchrest, chairman of the House Subcommittee on Coast Guard and Maritime Transportation.
HEALTH
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | June 9, 2010
Sinai Hospital has agreed to pay a $60,000 fine for irradiating a cancer patient in the wrong place, while Constellation Energy paid $12,670 for muddying a mountain stream as it builds a wind farm in Western Maryland, the state Department of the Environment reported Wednesday. The two cases were among 40 enforcement cases in which state regulators reported collecting or levying more than $500,000 in penalties in the past several weeks for air, water, radiation and lead paint violations.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,liz.kay@baltsun.com | January 18, 2009
THE PROBLEM : A homeowner's environmental citation fine continues to accrue even though he had applied for a hearing. THE BACKSTORY : Schuyler Denham received a $50 citation in October for leaving a toilet and a sink in the alley behind his Mondawmin home. His daughter, who lives in the house, was installing a new bathroom and had left the fixtures. "Apparently that was the day the inspector decided to walk down the alley," said Denham, who lives in Colorado. We_can_help@cable.comcast.
NEWS
By JOSH MITCHELL and JOSH MITCHELL,SUN REPORTER | July 4, 2006
Owners of commercial buildings that meet a standard for energy efficiency will receive a tax credit under legislation approved by the Baltimore County Council last night. The council also set up a hearing process for people accused of environmental violations and banned the parking of recreational vehicles on residential streets. All three measures passed by 6-0 votes, with Republican Councilman T. Bryan McIntire absent. The tax credit would be as much as 100 percent of a property tax bill and applies to so-called "green" buildings, which are designed to conserve energy and have a minimal impact on the environment.
NEWS
By JOSH MITCHELL and JOSH MITCHELL,SUN REPORTER | May 31, 2006
Looking to crack down on environmental violations during home construction, Baltimore County government officials are moving to assess fines more quickly. The county issues hundreds of citations a year to property owners who build homes on wetlands, damage streambeds or knock down protected trees. Most of the problems are corrected, but for the rest, the county must take the violators to District Court to issue a fine, a process that can take months. A bill scheduled to be introduced at Monday's County Council meeting would empower a county hearing officer to review the citations and determine fines.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Johnathon E. Briggs and Jackie Powder and Johnathon E. Briggs,SUN STAFF | June 1, 2001
Travis Pastrana, at 17, is a sensation in the world of professional motocross racing, known for his gravity-defying jumps performed while airborne on his bike. The teen-ager - who got his first motorcycle at 4 and has broken at least 20 bones - turned professional last year and has been racking up prize money and endorsement fees, expected to top $2 million this year. But his love for noisy, dirt-eating bikes has caused trouble in his Davidsonville neighborhood in Anne Arundel County. State and county officials have been investigating what appears to be an illegally built motocross course on property that is partly owned by Travis, and yesterday the county ordered three property owners to stop all work on the site.
NEWS
By Gary Cohn and Gary Cohn,SUN STAFF | June 26, 1998
In a crucial step in the effort to reform the government's troubled ship-scrapping program, the Senate passed legislation last night setting up a pilot project to test new ways of dismantling obsolete Navy vessels in the United States.The pilot project was approved as an amendment to the Department of Defense authorization bill, but still faces hurdles before the program could go into effect.The legislation would require the Navy to subsidize the disposal of its old ships instead of trying to make money from them.
NEWS
By Gary Cohn and Gary Cohn,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Will Englund contributed to this article | January 16, 1998
The Department of Defense is creating a high-level panel to review the Navy's troubled ship-scrapping program, which has harmed workers and polluted waters at ports around the country.The panel, which will be headed by a senior Defense Department official and include representatives from at least six government agencies, is expected to examine a broad range of safety, environmental and public policy issues and make recommendations in 60 days on reforming the program."Ships are very complex systems and we want to ensure we scrap these vessels in an environmentally sound, safe, affordable and commercially feasible way," said Patricia A. Rivers, who is heading the panel.
NEWS
By Gary Cohn and Gary Cohn,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Sean Somerville contributed to this article | May 13, 1998
Disappointed with the Defense Department's plans to improve its troubled ship-scrapping program, Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski introduced legislation yesterday to set up a pilot program to dismantle Navy vessels at U.S. shipyards.The legislation also would ban the sale of Navy and Maritime Administration ships for scrapping in the Third World, where worker-safety and environmental regulations are virtually nonexistent."The way we do this [dispose of old government vessels] is not being done in an honorable, environmentally sensitive, efficient way," Mikulski told the Senate.
NEWS
By Gary Cohn and Gary Cohn,SUN STAFF | June 5, 1998
After hearing testimony from government and maritime industry executives, the chairman of a congressional subcommittee said yesterday that he was concerned that the Defense Department's plans to reform its troubled ship-scrapping program do not go far enough."
NEWS
By Gary Cohn and Gary Cohn,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Sean Somerville contributed to this article | May 13, 1998
Disappointed with the Defense Department's plans to improve its troubled ship-scrapping program, Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski introduced legislation yesterday to set up a pilot program to dismantle Navy vessels at U.S. shipyards.The legislation also would ban the sale of Navy and Maritime Administration ships for scrapping in the Third World, where worker-safety and environmental regulations are virtually nonexistent."The way we do this [dispose of old government vessels] is not being done in an honorable, environmentally sensitive, efficient way," Mikulski told the Senate.
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