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NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,SUN STAFF | December 16, 1998
Thanks to efforts to curb sprawl -- and an end-of-the-year rush for tax write-offs -- the Maryland Environmental Trust is on its way to saving a record number of acres from development this year.Today, the Board of Public Works is expected to approve the acceptance of more than 3,000 acres in three counties into the easement program, almost as much as the trust receives in a typical year, said Director John Bernstein.Although not all of the easements coming before the board are signed agreements, Bernstein said he expects that by year's end the trust will have received the development rights on roughly 5,000 acres this year -- about 500 more than last year.
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FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | May 10, 2012
Representatives of land trusts and conservation groups are expected to gather May 15 in Columbia for a statewide conference on the challenges of saving land in Maryland. Howard County Executive Ken Ulman is scheduled to keynote the all-day event, which is hosted by the Maryland Environmental Trust . The conference, which runs from 8:30 a.m. to 7:30 p.m., is open to the public, though it'll cost $60 per person to cover all meals and admission to the sessions, including the trust's award ceremony and celebration.
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NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | July 23, 2002
An Elkridge couple who claimed that an environmental trust duped them into believing that it would not accept an easement unless they agreed not to subdivide their land have lost a legal challenge. In a case watched by the land conservation community, the state's high court ruled that the Maryland Environmental Trust did not defraud the couple when it did not explicitly state in 1989 that it would accept the gift of a less valuable easement. (In an easement, a property owner swaps development rights for tax breaks.
NEWS
By Ryan Davis and Ryan Davis,SUN STAFF | December 21, 2003
Residents fighting to save Crownsville Hospital Center have developed a second concern: that Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s administration has begun undoing his predecessor's promise to preserve a swath of the hospital's campus. Their fears stem from a recent state request that the Maryland Environmental Trust halt its preservation plans for 550 acres that were part of the hospital campus. But state officials said the residents should not be worried - at least not yet. "This is not a move to say we're going to throw a bunch of housing units on that" land, said Stephen S. Hershey Jr., an assistant secretary for the state Department of Planning.
NEWS
By Ryan Davis and Ryan Davis,SUN STAFF | December 21, 2003
Residents fighting to save Crownsville Hospital Center have developed a second concern: that Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s administration has begun undoing his predecessor's promise to preserve a swath of the hospital's campus. Their fears stem from a recent state request that the Maryland Environmental Trust halt its preservation plans for 550 acres that were part of the hospital campus. But state officials said the residents should not be worried - at least not yet. "This is not a move to say we're going to throw a bunch of housing units on that" land, said Stephen S. Hershey Jr., an assistant secretary for the state Department of Planning.
NEWS
By Melody Simmons and Melody Simmons,SUN STAFF | November 11, 1998
Concerned about a possible conflict of interest, the state Board of Public Works approved a $150,000 state grant yesterday for the purchase of a 138-acre farm near Glyndon, pending a review by the State Ethics Commission.A group of investors this summer raised money to buy and preserve the farm, which Bonnie View Country Club had been eyeing for a golf course. After inquiries by The Sun, the board asked the ethics commission to review the dual role of John C. Bernstein, who is director of the state's Maryland Environmental Trust and one of the investors in the farm deal.
NEWS
By Melody Simmons and Melody Simmons,SUN STAFF | September 17, 1997
A thick canopy of shade from centuries-old trees, and colorful wild berries, frogs and foxes occupy a stunning habitat just off Falls Road in Ruxton -- now preserved forever by a local benefactor.The 18-acre strip near Robert E. Lee Park was spared the development of three homes after a Baltimore County woman, )) who wants to remain anonymous, bought the property in May for $225,000 and donated it to the Maryland Environmental Trust. The trust immediately froze the parcel's beautiful legacy of nature with an easement.
NEWS
By Melody Simmons and Melody Simmons,SUN STAFF | April 25, 1999
Eight years old and 40 members strong, the Carroll County Land Trust hopes to post its first milestone this year -- preserving 1,000 acres of rich, historic land from rapid sprawl.The nonprofit group, which operates from the home of a former Carroll planning director, has joined forces with the county's Agricultural Land Preservation Program in a goal to save 100,000 acres from development.Members will soon embark on a fund-raising campaign that features an old-fashioned "road show" depicting slides of bucolic Carroll farms threatened by bulldozers.
NEWS
By Melody Simmons and Melody Simmons,SUN STAFF | February 17, 1998
Months after a Butler landowner clear-cut 31 rural acres in northern Baltimore County, the controversy over such foresting still smolders, as residents move to protect their land with tighter easements and preservationists use grant money to study the effect of clear-cutting.But a county councilman who had been considering tougher restrictions -- and held a public forum on the issue last week -- says he believes current laws are sufficient to protect harvested timberland from erosion."It seemed to me according to the testimony that clear-cutting does not cause any runoff," said T. Bryan McIntire, a north county-Owings Mills Republican whose district includes the Boyce property.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | April 23, 1997
Charging that Maryland is making it too easy for developers to destroy the state's wetlands, environmental groups threatened yesterday to sue the federal government for turning over protection of marshes and bogs to the state.The National Wildlife Federation and four other groups served formal notice that they will sue the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in 60 days for delegating to the state most of its responsibility for safeguarding Maryland's 600,000 acres of tidal and freshwater wetlands.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | July 23, 2002
An Elkridge couple who claimed that an environmental trust duped them into believing that it would not accept an easement unless they agreed not to subdivide their land have lost a legal challenge. In a case watched by the land conservation community, the state's high court ruled that the Maryland Environmental Trust did not defraud the couple when it did not explicitly state in 1989 that it would accept the gift of a less valuable easement. (In an easement, a property owner swaps development rights for tax breaks.
TOPIC
By Elizabeth Garland Wilmerding | June 25, 2000
EVERY THURSDAY, I drive my daughter from our house in Owings Mills to her piano lesson in Hunt Valley. We drive along Broadway and Padonia roads, and every week, I arrive at the teacher's doorstep filled with the same feeling of irretrievable loss that I felt when our puppy died. In this case, the loss is one of the natural world, a loss of majestic old trees, rolling farmland, wild flowers, bird life and animal life. The landscape literally changes from week to week, as there are fewer trees and more zoning notices with their ominous orange flags every time we pass through.
NEWS
By Melody Simmons and Melody Simmons,SUN STAFF | April 25, 1999
Eight years old and 40 members strong, the Carroll County Land Trust hopes to post its first milestone this year -- preserving 1,000 acres of rich, historic land from rapid sprawl.The nonprofit group, which operates from the home of a former Carroll planning director, has joined forces with the county's Agricultural Land Preservation Program in a goal to save 100,000 acres from development.Members will soon embark on a fund-raising campaign that features an old-fashioned "road show" depicting slides of bucolic Carroll farms threatened by bulldozers.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,SUN STAFF | December 16, 1998
Thanks to efforts to curb sprawl -- and an end-of-the-year rush for tax write-offs -- the Maryland Environmental Trust is on its way to saving a record number of acres from development this year.Today, the Board of Public Works is expected to approve the acceptance of more than 3,000 acres in three counties into the easement program, almost as much as the trust receives in a typical year, said Director John Bernstein.Although not all of the easements coming before the board are signed agreements, Bernstein said he expects that by year's end the trust will have received the development rights on roughly 5,000 acres this year -- about 500 more than last year.
NEWS
By Melody Simmons and Melody Simmons,SUN STAFF | November 11, 1998
Concerned about a possible conflict of interest, the state Board of Public Works approved a $150,000 state grant yesterday for the purchase of a 138-acre farm near Glyndon, pending a review by the State Ethics Commission.A group of investors this summer raised money to buy and preserve the farm, which Bonnie View Country Club had been eyeing for a golf course. After inquiries by The Sun, the board asked the ethics commission to review the dual role of John C. Bernstein, who is director of the state's Maryland Environmental Trust and one of the investors in the farm deal.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 26, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Industry opponents of a treaty to fight global warming have drafted an ambitious proposal to spend millions of dollars to persuade the public that a 1992 environmental accord is based on shaky science.Among their ideas is a campaign to recruit scientists who share the industry's views of climate science and to train them in public relations so they can persuade journalists, politicians and the public that the risk of global warming is too uncertain to justify controls on greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide that trap the sun's heat near Earth.
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