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Environmental Restoration

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NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | March 28, 2005
Chemical-eating bacteria are being injected into the ground under a Carroll County gasoline station in hopes they will eliminate a toxic gasoline additive found underground there - the first use in Maryland of a process by a South Carolina environmental firm. The company, phA Environmental Restoration, began injecting bacteria known to eat methyl tertiary butyl ether, or MTBE, at the station in Finksburg on Feb. 14. Last year, the Maryland Department of the Environment identified the Shell Jiffy Mart on Route 140 and Suffolk Road as the source of the MTBE.
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EXPLORE
January 28, 2013
Lynn Davis has been hired as a senior project manager for Harford-based Ecotone Inc., an ecological design build firm. Davis will be developing and managing Ecotone's environmental credit market services in the Mid-Atlantic region. Davis spent the last 14 years in the land development industry. As director of land development for Bob Ward Companies, and previously for Michael T. Rose Companies, she was responsible for managing all phases of residential development from planning and engineering through construction and final bond release.
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NEWS
By Lisa Respers and Lisa Respers,SUN STAFF | May 29, 1996
In a ceremony symbolizing a partnership of government effort, federal, state and local officials gathered yesterday in a Baltimore County park to sign an agreement on a study aimed at improving the Gwynns Falls watershed.The Baltimore Metropolitan Water Resources Feasibility Study is intended to investigate and develop environmental restoration methods and projects for Gwynns Falls, which runs through northwestern Baltimore County and the city, emptying in the Patapsco River's Middle Branch.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | December 29, 2011
When it rains, not only does storm water flow downstream, but so do the banks of small streams emptying into Red Hill Branch, bringing other pollutants with the eroding soil. In a move to stem environmental problems and add wildlife habitat, Howard County has begun four restoration projects for the waterway in Ellicott City. Officials say they expect the work, which includes overhauling a storm-water pond and stabilizing more than 5,000 feet of the banks of three streams, to be completed by May. Project manager Mark Richmond said the pond behind Salterforth Place will go from being a depression that is dry most of the time to a larger pond that always has water.
NEWS
By Lane Harvey Brown and Lane Harvey Brown,SUN STAFF | December 21, 2003
An Aberdeen Proving Ground environmental scientist said Friday that an emergency cleanup of aging glass bottles found along the banks of a Bush River tributary has turned up chemical warfare agent in some of the containers. Don Green, who works in the base's environmental restoration program, said he received a phone call late Thursday from the Edgewood Chemical Biological Center, which has been analyzing the containers since the cleanup began in the spring. The 28 bottles, which were discovered at the rear of a burial pit after grass along the shoreline was peeled back, contained some mustard agent and lewisite, Green said.
NEWS
May 11, 2010
I was excited to read your May 11 article entitled "Aquarium begins work on Middle Branch Park," which highlighted the planned transformation of a brownfields site along the Middle Branch of the Patapsco River into a community park. Given the magnitude of some of the environmental challenges faced by Baltimore and most cities across our nation, citizens should not simply expect that the public sector will be able to do all of the work. True collaboration will be required, if we are really serious about environmental restoration and the promotion of sustainable practices for the future.
EXPLORE
January 28, 2013
Lynn Davis has been hired as a senior project manager for Harford-based Ecotone Inc., an ecological design build firm. Davis will be developing and managing Ecotone's environmental credit market services in the Mid-Atlantic region. Davis spent the last 14 years in the land development industry. As director of land development for Bob Ward Companies, and previously for Michael T. Rose Companies, she was responsible for managing all phases of residential development from planning and engineering through construction and final bond release.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,larry.carson@baltsun.com | September 11, 2008
Another business-oriented group of Columbia activists in favor of the General Growth Properties plan to redevelop Town Center is organizing with the hope of playing a role in the long process. The group, called Columbia Tomorrow and led by development consultant Jud Malone, joins several others with similar objectives. They include Columbia 2.0, oriented toward younger adults, and Bring Back the Vision. Other groups, such as the Columbia Association and the Coalition for Columbia's downtown, have taken a more skeptical view of the GGP plan.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | July 22, 2010
The state's top court Thursday upheld the dismissal of a lawsuit asking that a building contractor raze the luxury compound he built without permits on an island in the Magothy River. The lawsuit, filed by the Critical Area Commission in 2008, was the first filed under state environmental enforcement measures toughened by legislators only months earlier. They strengthened the law largely in response to the illegal construction on 2-acre Little Dobbins Island. The Court of Appeals said Thursday that the 2008 provisions could not be applied retroactively to the construction by Daryl C. Wagner and his company, DCW Dutchship Island LLC, that was discovered four years before the law took effect.
NEWS
By Ben Block and Ben Block,Sun reporter | September 12, 2007
About half the crowd at a Columbia Association budget session came to support a citizens group's proposal for a Columbiawide watershed management program that would make the town's lakes healthier and more attractive. Members of the Committee for Lake Elkhorn's Environmental Restoration (CLEER) showed up in force to make sure they were heard. Group founder Elaine Pardoe said at the meeting Monday night that the plan would provide long-needed restoration of Owen Brown's recreational lake, after a planned dredging.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | January 16, 2011
While most of the Chesapeake Bay's islands are slowly vanishing beneath the waves, one not far from Baltimore is staging a remarkable renaissance. Poplar Island, former hunting retreat, hangout for politicos and black cat farm, had nearly washed away by the late 1990s. But it's since been restored to the size it was when it was still a thriving 19th-century farming and fishing community, using muck dredged from the shipping channels leading to Baltimore just 34 miles to the northwest.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | July 22, 2010
The state's top court Thursday upheld the dismissal of a lawsuit asking that a building contractor raze the luxury compound he built without permits on an island in the Magothy River. The lawsuit, filed by the Critical Area Commission in 2008, was the first filed under state environmental enforcement measures toughened by legislators only months earlier. They strengthened the law largely in response to the illegal construction on 2-acre Little Dobbins Island. The Court of Appeals said Thursday that the 2008 provisions could not be applied retroactively to the construction by Daryl C. Wagner and his company, DCW Dutchship Island LLC, that was discovered four years before the law took effect.
NEWS
May 11, 2010
I was excited to read your May 11 article entitled "Aquarium begins work on Middle Branch Park," which highlighted the planned transformation of a brownfields site along the Middle Branch of the Patapsco River into a community park. Given the magnitude of some of the environmental challenges faced by Baltimore and most cities across our nation, citizens should not simply expect that the public sector will be able to do all of the work. True collaboration will be required, if we are really serious about environmental restoration and the promotion of sustainable practices for the future.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,larry.carson@baltsun.com | September 11, 2008
Another business-oriented group of Columbia activists in favor of the General Growth Properties plan to redevelop Town Center is organizing with the hope of playing a role in the long process. The group, called Columbia Tomorrow and led by development consultant Jud Malone, joins several others with similar objectives. They include Columbia 2.0, oriented toward younger adults, and Bring Back the Vision. Other groups, such as the Columbia Association and the Coalition for Columbia's downtown, have taken a more skeptical view of the GGP plan.
NEWS
By Ben Block and Ben Block,Sun reporter | September 12, 2007
About half the crowd at a Columbia Association budget session came to support a citizens group's proposal for a Columbiawide watershed management program that would make the town's lakes healthier and more attractive. Members of the Committee for Lake Elkhorn's Environmental Restoration (CLEER) showed up in force to make sure they were heard. Group founder Elaine Pardoe said at the meeting Monday night that the plan would provide long-needed restoration of Owen Brown's recreational lake, after a planned dredging.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | March 28, 2005
Chemical-eating bacteria are being injected into the ground under a Carroll County gasoline station in hopes they will eliminate a toxic gasoline additive found underground there - the first use in Maryland of a process by a South Carolina environmental firm. The company, phA Environmental Restoration, began injecting bacteria known to eat methyl tertiary butyl ether, or MTBE, at the station in Finksburg on Feb. 14. Last year, the Maryland Department of the Environment identified the Shell Jiffy Mart on Route 140 and Suffolk Road as the source of the MTBE.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | December 29, 2011
When it rains, not only does storm water flow downstream, but so do the banks of small streams emptying into Red Hill Branch, bringing other pollutants with the eroding soil. In a move to stem environmental problems and add wildlife habitat, Howard County has begun four restoration projects for the waterway in Ellicott City. Officials say they expect the work, which includes overhauling a storm-water pond and stabilizing more than 5,000 feet of the banks of three streams, to be completed by May. Project manager Mark Richmond said the pond behind Salterforth Place will go from being a depression that is dry most of the time to a larger pond that always has water.
NEWS
By Lane Harvey Brown and Lane Harvey Brown,SUN STAFF | December 21, 2003
An Aberdeen Proving Ground environmental scientist said Friday that an emergency cleanup of aging glass bottles found along the banks of a Bush River tributary has turned up chemical warfare agent in some of the containers. Don Green, who works in the base's environmental restoration program, said he received a phone call late Thursday from the Edgewood Chemical Biological Center, which has been analyzing the containers since the cleanup began in the spring. The 28 bottles, which were discovered at the rear of a burial pit after grass along the shoreline was peeled back, contained some mustard agent and lewisite, Green said.
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