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BUSINESS
April 2, 2008
IBM Corp. Shares rose $1.35 to $116.49, even as the company was hit with a temporary ban on new federal contracts amid an inquiry into interactions between employees and the Environmental Protection Agency.
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NEWS
January 1, 2013
Kudos to Lisa Jackson, the head of the Environmental Protection Agency who is stepping down from her cabinet-level position after the president's State of the Union address in January ("Chief of EPA to leave post," Dec. 28). Ms. Jackson has performed brilliantly in an often thankless job. Because of her efforts, the nation has been spared countless deaths and illnesses due to polluted air, water and soil. She was vilified by Republicans who accused her of harming the economy and slowing job creation.
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NEWS
September 4, 2012
Your editorial on the Environmental Protection Agency's new fuel efficiency standards was right on point ("EPA gets it right," Aug. 29). It lets us know where a Romney administration's priorities really would be on fuel standards. Hopefully, anyone who hasn't made up their minds about who to vote for in November will now know how to cast their ballot. James Maddox Jr., Baltimore
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2012
— In a challenge to the Obama administration's efforts to jump-start the lagging restoration of the Chesapeake Bay, lawyers for farmers and homebuilders argued in federal court here Thursday that the Environmental Protection Agency overstepped its legal authority and relied on a flawed computer model in setting a pollution "diet" for the ailing estuary. Lawyers for the American Farm Bureau Federation, the National Association of Home Builders, poultry and pork producers, and other farming groups argued that states in the Chesapeake watershed, not the federal government, should be in charge of deciding how and where to reduce pollution fouling the bay. They also complained that the far-reaching "diet" was rushed into place despite gaps and errors and without giving the public enough time to review and comment on it. "It will affect urban growth; it affects how agriculture land will be used," said Richard E. Schwartz, one of the industry groups' lawyers.
NEWS
March 21, 1991
State agriculture officials moved in the right direction to protect unsuspecting eagles and other birds when it declared that the state will require farmers this spring to bury the pesticide Furadan underground with their plantings instead of spreading it on top of the soil.Still, environmental groups want bolder moves. Furadan was traced to bald eagle deaths in 1988 and the poisoning of other birds. The incidents, caused by the misuse of Furadan by farmers planting corn, have resulted in citations and penalties.
NEWS
March 4, 1992
The Environmental Protection Agency has awarded $50,000 to a St. Mary's County citizens' group so it can hire an outside expert to review the federal agency's plan to incinerate contaminated soil at a Superfund site in Hollywood.Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski, D-Md., said she requested the grant to ensure that citizens' be heard on the issue of the planned cleanup of the old Southern Maryland Wood Treatment plant.The EPA plans to burn 100,000 tons of soil contaminated with creosote, pentachlorophenol and small amounts of dioxin, all probable human carcinogens, at the site.
NEWS
January 1, 2013
Kudos to Lisa Jackson, the head of the Environmental Protection Agency who is stepping down from her cabinet-level position after the president's State of the Union address in January ("Chief of EPA to leave post," Dec. 28). Ms. Jackson has performed brilliantly in an often thankless job. Because of her efforts, the nation has been spared countless deaths and illnesses due to polluted air, water and soil. She was vilified by Republicans who accused her of harming the economy and slowing job creation.
NEWS
July 9, 1991
In an attempt to interest more black college students in environmental science careers, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and Morgan State University signed a pact yesterday to strengthen ties between them.Nine Morgan State University students are spending this summer at EPA research laboratories around the country, and the agreement will likely mean more such opportunities for students, said Eugene DeLoatch, dean of the School of Engineering at Morgan State.The pact also will mean that Environmental Protection Agency scientists will work with Morgan State students and professors on joint research projects, Dr. DeLoatch said.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | November 21, 1992
WASHINGTON -- The Bush administration, sidestepping one of the most controversial issues remaining on its calendar, has decided that it will not act to weaken rules preventing development of the nation's wetlands, a senior White House official said yesterday.The decision, made shortly after the election, means that President Bush is handing over to the Clinton administration the question of whether to redefine a wetland in a way that would allow more of them to be filled in or otherwise developed.
NEWS
By Tanya Jones and Tanya Jones,SUN STAFF | October 18, 1996
The Environmental Protection Agency will break ground today on a $47 million laboratory and office building at Fort Meade.The 140,000-square-foot Environmental Services Center, near Mapes Road and Route 175, is scheduled to be completed by fall 1998. The agreement between Fort Meade and EPA will save the federal government money it otherwise would have needed to purchase or lease land.The center will bring together 160 scientists, engineers and support employees now working in leased space in Annapolis and at the Department of Agriculture in Beltsville.
NEWS
September 4, 2012
Your editorial on the Environmental Protection Agency's new fuel efficiency standards was right on point ("EPA gets it right," Aug. 29). It lets us know where a Romney administration's priorities really would be on fuel standards. Hopefully, anyone who hasn't made up their minds about who to vote for in November will now know how to cast their ballot. James Maddox Jr., Baltimore
NEWS
June 11, 2011
There is a rat fight going on between the Environmental Protection Agency and some pest control manufacturers that could affect Maryland backyards. At issue is whether residents will continue to be able to kill rats with certain potent poisons, which can now be purchased at hardware stores and are strong enough to dispatch the rodents after they make one visit to a poisoned meal. The EPA said this week it wanted to prohibit residential consumers from administering these poisons, making the stronger stuff available only to farmers and professional exterminators.
NEWS
January 18, 2011
In your January 14 editorial "Faulty stewardship," you took great aim at the agricultural community and the Farm Bureau for its recent lawsuit against the Environmental Protection Agency. We would like to set you straight on some facts so that your readers are completely educated about this recent action. This lawsuit is not seeking to delay clean-up of the Chesapeake Bay. Farmers are committed to doing their part to achieve the goal of clean water for the Chesapeake Bay. The U.S. Department of Agriculture's Natural Resource Conservation Service found that farmers were actively implementing erosion control practices on about 96 percent of the cropland acres in the watershed and found that sediment contributions to the region's rivers and streams are being reduced by 64 percent, nitrogen by 36 percent, and phosphorus by 43 percent.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | December 7, 2010
The Environmental Protection Agency's Chesapeake Bay "czar" announced Tuesday he is leaving to help launch an international ocean conservation organization. J. Charles "Chuck" Fox, senior adviser to the EPA's administrator on cleanup of the bay and of the Anacostia River, said in a brief interview that he's taking "a dream job" next month to work on saving endangered marine creatures around the world. He's leaving at a crucial time for the long-running bay restoration effort, as federal and state officials have dickered over how to accelerate the pace of cleanup after nearly three decades of costly efforts and frustration.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | October 19, 2010
The Environmental Protection Agency proposed Tuesday taking over cleanup of a former fireworks and munitions plant near Elkton in Cecil County because of extensive groundwater contamination there. The agency announced it was proposing the Dwyer property, as the 73-acre tract is known, for inclusion on the Superfund National Priorities List, a compendium of the most polluted sites in the nation. The abandoned and overgrown property has been under investigation by the Maryland Department of the Environment since 1989.
NEWS
By From Sun staff and news services | January 8, 2010
The Environmental Protection Agency proposed the nation's strictest-ever smog limits Thursday, a move that could put large parts of the country in violation of federal air-quality regulations. The EPA proposed allowing a ground-level ozone concentration of 60 to 70 parts per billion, down from the 75 parts per billion standard adopted under President George W. Bush in 2008. Obama administration officials and environmental groups say the new standards align with the levels scientists say are needed to safeguard against increased respiratory diseases, particularly in children, and that they could eventually save $100 billion in heath costs.
BUSINESS
February 14, 1997
Three state environmental companies got grants through the National Association of State Development Agencies to help them sell in Latin America and Asia.EA Global Inc., a subsidiary of Hunt Valley-based EA Engineering, received $20,000 to design, build and test a mobile wastewater treatment system. The system is intended to demonstrate EA's environmental engineering capabilities in central China.ThermoChem Inc., based in Columbia, received $10,000 to help it market its waste-treatment system to Brazil's pulp and paper industry.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Staff Writer | April 22, 1992
Seizing on the 23rd observance of Earth Day, federal, state and local officials have announced a series of steps aimed at cleaning up Baltimore, including a new study of the health and environmental risks faced by urban residents.But the announcement yesterday struck a sour note with some environmentalists, who accused officials of dodging their responsibilities to crack down on pollution.The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency said it has chosen Baltimore and Washington, D.C., to launch a new program aimed at identifying and reducing the public health and environmental hazards to which city dwellers may be exposed.
NEWS
By Juliet Eilperin and Juliet Eilperin,The Washington Post | May 3, 2009
WASHINGTON - Faced with new evidence that utilities across the country are dumping toxic sludge into waterways, the Environmental Protection Agency is moving to impose new restrictions on the level of contaminants power plants can discharge. Plants in Florida, Pennsylvania and several other states have flushed wastewater with levels of selenium and other toxins that far exceed the EPA's freshwater and saltwater standards aimed at protecting aquatic life, according to data the agency has collected over the past few years.
NEWS
July 9, 2008
Agency honors green workers The Maryland Automobile Insurance Fund today will host "One Year Green," a celebration of MAIF's environmental achievements. MAIF employees who have demonstrated a commitment to making eco-friendly solutions routine in their daily operations will be honored with a "Green Thumb" award, and MAIF's Earth Day pledge tree will be dedicated on the grounds of MAIF's headquarters in Annapolis. "MAIF is committed to working toward a more environmentally friendly business model," said M. Kent Krabbe, executive director for MAIF.
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