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NEWS
March 20, 1993
The discovery in 1991 of a double-packed small vessel of lethal nerve agent in a building with two pressurized containment-seal systems at Aberdeen Proving Ground should surprise no one. After all, that's where chemical warfare substances were tested for decades under controlled conditions.The metal container was found during a thorough two-year sweep of the infamous Pilot Plant laboratory building, which had been shut down in 1986, and was promptly reported to state environmental authorities.
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NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | March 13, 2014
State environmental officials and the owners of the Sparrows Point peninsula are moving toward a settlement to correct alleged regulatory violations at the former steelmaking site. Regulators say an array of problems have occurred over the past year on the 2,300-acre peninsula, including illegal open dumping of industrial sludge, improper handling of hazardous materials and the running of an unlicensed scrap tire operation. "We are drafting a settlement in the form of a consent order which will provide terms and a schedule for corrective actions - and which will include a financial penalty," Maryland Department of the Environment spokesman Jay Apperson said in a statement.
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NEWS
By Joe Mathews and Joe Mathews,SUN STAFF | August 1, 1996
Residents and entrepreneurs from South Baltimore and northern Anne Arundel County met in Curtis Bay last night to discuss environmental problems that might be addressed by a year-old community-business partnership.The Community Partnership for Environmental Protection is part of an effort by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to improve the environment in the heavily industrialized neighborhoods in the southern Baltimore metropolitan area. "We want to be seen as a facilitator, not an actor here," said Bill Sanders, director of the EPA's Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics in Washington.
NEWS
September 6, 2013
The main point to be drawn from Tom Horton's article about immigration's impact on the Chesapeake Bay region is that there's no way to separate population problems from environmental problems, and vice versa ("Immigration's impact," Sept. 3). Advocates for both issues have failed to acknowledge this fact for far too long, but the hot-button issue of immigration makes it impossible for them to continue to maintain their distance. As Mr. Horton noted, whatever the merits of immigration reform, immigration will remain the primary factor in U.S. population growth, which, if present rates continue, will swell from our present 315 million to some 445 million by mid-century.
NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | May 1, 2002
When J. Craig Venter was ousted from the Rockville company he created to decode the human genome, scientists doubted it would be the last anybody would hear from the maverick geneticist. Yesterday, they were proved right. Three months after he left the spotlight, the 55-year-old scientist leapt back in, announcing he would use the more than $100 million he earned at Celera Genomics and previous ventures to educate the public on the possibilities - and potential dangers - of genetic advances.
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | November 8, 2002
IT'S WORTH reminding ourselves that Vulcan, the Roman god of fire and metalworking, was the only physically imperfect immortal. This god of technology walked with a limp. Some legends say he was born with a bad leg; others say he injured it (maybe from kicking himself for marrying the beautiful and seductive, but unfaithful, Venus). Technology to this day is like that happy couple -- alluring, promising much, appearing almost godlike in its ability to solve problems painlessly. We can't do without it. But don't ever forget the limp, or expect it will always be true to your desires.
NEWS
December 1, 1990
Harry M. Caudill, 68, a retired lawyer and state legislator whose 1963 expose of Appalachia's social and environmental problems, "Night Comes to the Cumberlands," helped inspire President Lyndon B. Johnson's War on Poverty in the 1960s, killed himself Thursday in Pikeville, Ky. Mr. Caudill taught Appalachian history for eight years at the University of Kentucky until 1985.
NEWS
By Terry J. Harris | August 17, 1995
CANDIDATES for election to city offices are getting an earful this summer. Voters are concerned about a lot of things; drugs, crime, curfews, education and housing. Yet when many seemingly smaller ''environmental issues'' are considered together, they combine in one large and potentially decisive issue for the September primary election.Indeed, Baltimore's environmental problems are so severe and so widespread that candidates would do well to take notice. And besides, as any neighborhood association member can attest, the state of the local urban environment is of utmost importance not only to neighborhood pride but fundamentally quality of urban life.
NEWS
January 22, 1991
An unusual number of cancer cases at Jessup Elementary School has triggered an investigation by county health officials.Seven staff members at the 630-student school have contracted cancer, including atleast five teachers, officials said.No student is involved in the investigation.Health officials are trying to determine whether the cancer cases are related, said Evelyn Stein, spokeswoman for the Anne Arundel Health Department.Ifthe cancer cases appear related, investigators will look for asbestos, lead-tainted water or other environmental problems, she said.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,Washington Bureau | May 18, 1992
WASHINGTON -- The World Bank urges adoption of "people-first" environmental policies in a report to be published today, warning that food production will have to double and industrial output triple for the 3.7 billion people expected to be added to global population by the year 2030.Providing adequate water, sanitation, electricity and roads for the increased population, with adequate environmental safeguards, will cost an additional $75 billion a year by the turn of the century, the report estimated.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | December 8, 2012
Environmental activists met Saturday at the University of Baltimore to organize a push for a legislative ban on the natural gas drilling technique known as hydraulic fracturing — or fracking — casting the issue as a fight pitting the little guys versus the lobbyists. Del. Heather R. Mizeur told the crowd of about 200 activists that she wanted Maryland to show others that they can hold the gas industry accountable before drilling starts, rather than trying to clean up after any environmental problems.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | January 30, 2012
Scientists, economists, politicians, educators and even an artist gathered Monday in Annapolis to mark the launch of an unusual University of Maryland think tank that aims to bring academic disciplines together to tackle thorny environmental issues. The aim of the National Socio-Environmental Synthesis Center is to foster collaboration among natural and social scientists so they can help policy-makers, businesses and the public find ways to balance the needs of people and the environment.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, Special to The Baltimore Sun | January 7, 2012
For a group deeply worried about mankind's survival in a world racked by escalating environmental problems, Earth Forum of Howard County takes an approach that dovetails nicely with the county's campaign for civility. While the four-year-old church-sponsored organization promotes a respectful exchange of ideas among all on issues relating to global warming, sustainable living and care of the environment, its heart beats with a passion for radical change in how we treat the planet.
NEWS
By Ron Smith | July 17, 2009
A quick question: What's the biggest environmental problem facing humanity today. Is it global warming? One would certainly think so judging from the actions of various governments, which are trying to reduce those manmade greenhouse gas emissions we hear so much about. Is it dwindling energy resources, running up against the limits of agricultural technology in feeding the earth's population, or perhaps diminished supplies of fresh water, without which life cannot be sustained? All of the above are exacerbated by the continued growth in the number of people living on this planet.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN REPORTER | November 9, 2007
A federal judge gave Maryland the go-ahead yesterday to begin construction of a long-debated highway in the Washington suburbs, flatly rejecting environmentalists' challenges to the $2.4 billion project. Judge Alexander Williams Jr. of the U.S. District Court in Greenbelt denied the plaintiffs' request for an injunction against the Intercounty Connector, a six-lane, 18.8-mile toll road connecting the Interstate 95 corridor with Interstate 270 in Montgomery County. The judge's decision, unless overturned in what would be a long-shot appeal, removes the final obstacle to construction of the Laurel-to-Gaithersburg highway, first included in Washington-area transportation plans in 1953 as part of an Outer Beltway around Washington.
NEWS
By Greg Garland and Greg Garland,Sun reporter | September 18, 2007
A deal the state struck last month to buy a 74-acre property at the northern tip of Kent Island has been put on hold to allow the seller time to clean up a small area of environmental contamination, officials said yesterday. General Services Secretary Alvin C. Collins notified members of the Board of Public Works yesterday of the delay in settling the $7.2 million purchase of the Langenfelder Marine property, which the board approved Aug. 1 in a 2-1 vote. Under the terms of the contract, the property owner - Atchafalya Holdings LLC - has 180 days from the date of the vote to fix any environmental problems on the site, said David Humphrey, a spokesman for the General Services Department.
NEWS
September 25, 1991
The Board of County Commissioners agreed Monday to proceed with a study to determine how to zone industrial property with environmental impacts in mind.James C. Threatte, director of the county Office of Economic Development, said the county should consider environmentalimpacts before land is zoned for industrial use."From an industrial point of view, it's unnecessary for us to be at odds with environmental groups. We've got to get smarter," he said.The county will work through its Industrial Development Authority to obtain a matching $20,000 grant from the state for the study, Threatte said.
NEWS
November 11, 1990
STOP POISONING LAKE CLAIRE WITH SEWAGEFrom: William R. WaldmanArnoldWithin the past few years there has arisen a large awareness of environmental problems nationwide.There has been much debate over the pollution of the earth's most natural resource: its waters.Much attention has been thrust toward this after the Exxon Valdez incident occurred about two years ago.It is time that the county begin looking into cleaning up its own waters. One such body of water that recently has been polluted is Lake Claire on the Broadneck Peninsula.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | March 3, 2005
Mace Tokumi Miyasaki, an electrical engineer who applied his scientific expertise to commercial development and solving environmental problems, died at his Cedarcroft home Feb. 24 a week after open-heart surgery. He was 65. "Mace was probably one of the best problem-solvers I ever met in my life. He was an incredible out-front ... thinker," said Steve Seymour, a business partner who is also president of Rockland Investments. A scientist and businessman active in a number of organizations, Mr. Miyasaki drew praise for his abundant energy.
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | April 13, 2004
An Oklahoma Indian tribe is the latest group interested in developing a landfill on a 481-acre parcel near Odenton - a project neighbors and Anne Arundel officials have opposed for more than a decade. County officials said they're also concerned the tribe might attempt to open a gambling facility on the land, though the Delaware Nation of Anadarko, Okla., has not indicated any such plans. County Executive Janet S. Owens sent a letter to the federal Bureau of Indian Affairs last week criticizing the proposed purchase by the Delaware Nation.
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