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Environmental President

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By Rick Nichols | February 3, 1992
IF THE "environment president" mentioned the environment in his State of the Union address, I missed it. He talked a lot about the Persian Gulf. He had a throwaway line in there about his "national energy strategy," though he squandered the real moment after the war, pushing for drilling the Arctic instead of conservation and efficiency.That was about it. There was no bold initiative, say, to retool the sagging defense industry, to redirect it to combat pollution -- and profit handsomely -- with innovative, made-in-America technology.
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NEWS
By Peter Honey and Peter Honey,Washington Bureau | October 24, 1992
Each Saturday from now until the NOv. 3 election, The Sun i examining the stands of the presidential nominees on major issues.WHAT IS AT STAKE.When you talk about the environment you can't avoid the "vision" thing, as President Bush once termed the ability to see beyond immediate problems.Public opinion polls show consistently that Americans care strongly about the environment, and that a large majority would make economic sacrifices to protect the environment.The polls also show that Americans are overwhelmingly concerned about economic growth.
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NEWS
May 20, 1992
Pity the "environmental president." His White House has just argued itself into a position it knows is indefensible. Now the question is how to get back to a reasonable stance without looking like a complete crowd of obfuscators and back-waddlers.In 1988, Candidate George Bush, fresh from his visit to putrid Boston Harbor, pledged to clean up the environment and undercut Massachusetts Gov. Michael Dukakis' chances of overtaking him in the presidential race. Among other things, Mr. Bush promised to remove the congressional logjam on Clean Air Act revisions.
NEWS
May 20, 1992
Pity the "environmental president." His White House has just argued itself into a position it knows is indefensible. Now the question is how to get back to a reasonable stance without looking like a complete crowd of obfuscators and back-waddlers.In 1988, Candidate George Bush, fresh from his visit to putrid Boston Harbor, pledged to clean up the environment and undercut Massachusetts Gov. Michael Dukakis' chances of overtaking him in the presidential race. Among other things, Mr. Bush promised to remove the congressional logjam on Clean Air Act revisions.
NEWS
October 8, 1991
George Bush is playing rhetorical games with the nation's wetlands policy. During his 1988 campaign, Bush -- who wants to be the "environmental president" -- pledged "no net loss" of wetlands, the coastal marshes, swamps and prairie potholes that flood seasonally. But sticking to that commitment would have put about 100 million acres nationwide off limits to bulldozers and cranes. Developers and oil and lumber companies complained.So the President's Council on Competitiveness, chaired by Vice President Dan Quayle, simply recommended changing the definition of wetlands.
NEWS
By Nelson Schwartz and Nelson Schwartz,Washington Bureau of The Sun | January 24, 1992
WASHINGTON -- President Bush got a barely passing grade and Democratic challenger Bill Clinton received mixed reviews yesterday as a political advocacy group rated the environmental records of the seven major presidential candidates.President Bush was given a "D" for his first three years in office by the League of Conservation Voters. He was the only candidate given a letter grade; the Democrats received either a percentage score or a verbal rating."The president wants to have it both ways," said Jim Maddy, the league's executive director, at a news conference.
NEWS
By Myriam Marquez | May 17, 1991
YOU CAN see it along the food aisles of your neighborhood grocery store, or even at most fast-food joints: The more environmentally conscious "Green Decade" is upon us.From soup cans made of aluminum instead of wasteful steel to burgers wrapped in biodegradable paper instead of packaged in plastic or polyurethane, companies have realized that it's a plus to market their products to appeal to consumer awareness about protecting the environment.Interestingly, businesses seem to have gotten ahead of the federal government on the environment.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond & Jules Witcover | October 31, 1991
Washington A FILM CLIP of Gov. Bill Clinton of Arkansas making a campaign speech appeared on an NBC network news broadcast the other night, but only because he was speaking at Georgetown University here and covering the same topic President Bush discussed at atial nomination. They are still unknowns to most voters, and the television networks -- the prime purveyor of political news -- are paying so little attention to them that raising their recognition level is an uphill struggle.To some degree, the problem is a function of the fact the campaign began so late while Democrats waited for the glow of the Persian Gulf war to fade.
NEWS
By Peter Honey and Peter Honey,Washington Bureau | October 24, 1992
Each Saturday from now until the NOv. 3 election, The Sun i examining the stands of the presidential nominees on major issues.WHAT IS AT STAKE.When you talk about the environment you can't avoid the "vision" thing, as President Bush once termed the ability to see beyond immediate problems.Public opinion polls show consistently that Americans care strongly about the environment, and that a large majority would make economic sacrifices to protect the environment.The polls also show that Americans are overwhelmingly concerned about economic growth.
NEWS
By Peter Honey and Peter Honey,Washington Bureau | March 18, 1992
WASHINGTON -- The environment has played a tangible, though indecisive and often contradictory, role in the presidential primaries so far.Paul E. Tsongas' support for nuclear power almost robbed him of victory in the Maine caucuses, but it did not stop him from winning handsomely in the Maryland primary.Arkansas Gov. Bill Clinton's rivals have hammered him on his state's sorry environmental record. But it's Flowers, not flora, that raised questions about his electability.The strong environmental message in Edmund G. "Jerry" Brown Jr.'s "insurgency campaign" clinched his win in the Colorado primary and gave him a near-upset in Maine, analysts say. But it brought him no joy in Florida, despite Floridians' deep-seated concerns for environmental issues like wetlands protection.
NEWS
April 27, 1992
Out of touchRegarding the perks and free services of congressmen and other elected and appointed officials, I would expect them to be required to bear the expense of their own personal transportation, recreational, beauty and barbershop services and other personal needs from their monthly earnings, just as "we the people" are required to do.Not only must we pay our own personal expenses but we are expected to bear the expenses of a protective "cocoon" for...
NEWS
By Peter Honey and Peter Honey,Washington Bureau | March 18, 1992
WASHINGTON -- The environment has played a tangible, though indecisive and often contradictory, role in the presidential primaries so far.Paul E. Tsongas' support for nuclear power almost robbed him of victory in the Maine caucuses, but it did not stop him from winning handsomely in the Maryland primary.Arkansas Gov. Bill Clinton's rivals have hammered him on his state's sorry environmental record. But it's Flowers, not flora, that raised questions about his electability.The strong environmental message in Edmund G. "Jerry" Brown Jr.'s "insurgency campaign" clinched his win in the Colorado primary and gave him a near-upset in Maine, analysts say. But it brought him no joy in Florida, despite Floridians' deep-seated concerns for environmental issues like wetlands protection.
NEWS
By Peter Honey and Peter Honey,Washington Bureau | March 18, 1992
WASHINGTON -- The environment has played a tangible, though indecisive and often contradictory, role in the presidential primaries so far.Paul E. Tsongas' support for nuclear power almost robbed him of victory in the Maine caucuses, but it did not stop him from winning handsomely in the Maryland primary.Arkansas Gov. Bill Clinton's rivals have hammered him on his state's sorry environmental record. But it's Flowers, not flora, that raised questions about his electability.The strong environmental message in Edmund G. "Jerry" Brown Jr.'s "insurgency campaign" clinched his win in the Colorado primary and gave him a near-upset in Maine, analysts say. But it brought him no joy in Florida, despite Floridians' deep-seated concerns for environmental issues like wetlands protection.
NEWS
By Rick Nichols | February 3, 1992
IF THE "environment president" mentioned the environment in his State of the Union address, I missed it. He talked a lot about the Persian Gulf. He had a throwaway line in there about his "national energy strategy," though he squandered the real moment after the war, pushing for drilling the Arctic instead of conservation and efficiency.That was about it. There was no bold initiative, say, to retool the sagging defense industry, to redirect it to combat pollution -- and profit handsomely -- with innovative, made-in-America technology.
NEWS
By Nelson Schwartz and Nelson Schwartz,Washington Bureau of The Sun | January 24, 1992
WASHINGTON -- President Bush got a barely passing grade and Democratic challenger Bill Clinton received mixed reviews yesterday as a political advocacy group rated the environmental records of the seven major presidential candidates.President Bush was given a "D" for his first three years in office by the League of Conservation Voters. He was the only candidate given a letter grade; the Democrats received either a percentage score or a verbal rating."The president wants to have it both ways," said Jim Maddy, the league's executive director, at a news conference.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond & Jules Witcover | October 31, 1991
Washington A FILM CLIP of Gov. Bill Clinton of Arkansas making a campaign speech appeared on an NBC network news broadcast the other night, but only because he was speaking at Georgetown University here and covering the same topic President Bush discussed at atial nomination. They are still unknowns to most voters, and the television networks -- the prime purveyor of political news -- are paying so little attention to them that raising their recognition level is an uphill struggle.To some degree, the problem is a function of the fact the campaign began so late while Democrats waited for the glow of the Persian Gulf war to fade.
NEWS
April 27, 1992
Out of touchRegarding the perks and free services of congressmen and other elected and appointed officials, I would expect them to be required to bear the expense of their own personal transportation, recreational, beauty and barbershop services and other personal needs from their monthly earnings, just as "we the people" are required to do.Not only must we pay our own personal expenses but we are expected to bear the expenses of a protective "cocoon" for...
NEWS
By Peter Honey and Peter Honey,Washington Bureau | March 18, 1992
WASHINGTON -- The environment has played a tangible, though indecisive and often contradictory, role in the presidential primaries so far.Paul E. Tsongas' support for nuclear power almost robbed him of victory in the Maine caucuses, but it did not stop him from winning handsomely in the Maryland primary.Arkansas Gov. Bill Clinton's rivals have hammered him on his state's sorry environmental record. But it's Flowers, not flora, that raised questions about his electability.The strong environmental message in Edmund G. "Jerry" Brown Jr.'s "insurgency campaign" clinched his win in the Colorado primary and gave him a near-upset in Maine, analysts say. But it brought him no joy in Florida, despite Floridians' deep-seated concerns for environmental issues like wetlands protection.
NEWS
October 8, 1991
George Bush is playing rhetorical games with the nation's wetlands policy. During his 1988 campaign, Bush -- who wants to be the "environmental president" -- pledged "no net loss" of wetlands, the coastal marshes, swamps and prairie potholes that flood seasonally. But sticking to that commitment would have put about 100 million acres nationwide off limits to bulldozers and cranes. Developers and oil and lumber companies complained.So the President's Council on Competitiveness, chaired by Vice President Dan Quayle, simply recommended changing the definition of wetlands.
NEWS
By Myriam Marquez | May 17, 1991
YOU CAN see it along the food aisles of your neighborhood grocery store, or even at most fast-food joints: The more environmentally conscious "Green Decade" is upon us.From soup cans made of aluminum instead of wasteful steel to burgers wrapped in biodegradable paper instead of packaged in plastic or polyurethane, companies have realized that it's a plus to market their products to appeal to consumer awareness about protecting the environment.Interestingly, businesses seem to have gotten ahead of the federal government on the environment.
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