Advertisement
HomeCollectionsEnvironmental Movement
IN THE NEWS

Environmental Movement

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | April 17, 1995
WASHINGTON -- The environmental movement's most concerted campaign in a generation is about to get under way as environmental groups around the country work to make the 25th anniversary of Earth Day spark a rebellion against a broad rollback of environmental legislation.Trying to influence lawmakers of both parties as they meet with constituents during the congressional recess, the groups are reviving all the usual organizing tools of a movement that came of age in 1970.They are also using new lobbying tactics that evolved after the first Earth Day, when millions of people took to the streets and helped persuade Congress to pass dozens of environmental laws in the ensuing decades.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | April 20, 2014
For the children visiting the Pearlstone Center's sustainable farm Sunday, the chickens and baby goats might have been the main event. But supporters of the Family Farm Day said they hope that interaction will be the start of a deeper connection with faith and the environment. "It touches something deeper than themselves," said Sharon Goldman Wallach, 38, who attended the day with her father and two young daughters. "It's a double hit. " The Pearlstone Center event was one of the kickoff activities for Baltimore Green Week, a weeklong affair launched in 2004 as part of a Struever Bros.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By McClatchy-Tribune | April 16, 2007
KANSAS CITY, Mo. -- Simran Sethi knows what the stereotype of the environmental movement used to be. "Hemp-wearing, yurt-living, off-the-grid hippies," she said. "Either that or upper-middle-class white males. Those were pretty limited definitions of environmentalists - and none of them were any fun." On TV The Green premieres at 9 p.m. tomorrow on the Sundance Channel.
NEWS
By Nancy C. Unger | September 16, 2012
Mitt Romney wants to open up more federal lands and waters to drilling for oil and natural gas. His party is pushing, in the name of freedom and economic opportunity, to roll back a variety of environmental protections. Republicans, including U.S. Sen. Pat Roberts of Kansas, are seeking to ease pesticide regulations; some are even questioning the Environmental Protection Agency's ban on DDT, reopening a controversy that stretches back half a century. Fifty years ago this month, Rachel Carson published "Silent Spring.
NEWS
September 15, 1991
A former college professor who became active in the battle to save ancient forests of the Pacific Northwest will lecture on his experiences in the environmental movement at Western Maryland College.Environmentalist Lou Gold's lecture, featuring personal anecdotes and a slide presentation, is sponsored by the WMC Student Environmental Action Coalition and the Sierra Club Catoctin Group of Frederick. The free event will be conducted at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday in the Decker College Center Forum at WMC.Gold taught American government and politics at Oberlin College and the University of Illinois before deciding to leave academia for the wilderness Northwest.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 5, 2000
MEXICO CITY -- Mexico learned last week that it cannot be half-global. After five years of pressure from an environmental movement that is more transnational every day, the government canceled plans Thursday with Mitsubishi Corp. of Japan to build a gigantic salt plant on the shores of a lagoon where gray whales give birth. It was a decision Mexico never expected to make when the battle began, in the early stages of the country's broad opening to foreign commerce under the 1994 North American Free Trade Agreement.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | April 20, 2014
For the children visiting the Pearlstone Center's sustainable farm Sunday, the chickens and baby goats might have been the main event. But supporters of the Family Farm Day said they hope that interaction will be the start of a deeper connection with faith and the environment. "It touches something deeper than themselves," said Sharon Goldman Wallach, 38, who attended the day with her father and two young daughters. "It's a double hit. " The Pearlstone Center event was one of the kickoff activities for Baltimore Green Week, a weeklong affair launched in 2004 as part of a Struever Bros.
NEWS
April 29, 1998
IS IMMIGRATION an environmental issue? That's what Sierra Club members were essentially asked in a mailed ballot in which they voted by a 3-2 margin to affirm the environmental organization's neutral stand on U.S. immigration.Sierra Club has long supported global population stabilization to reduce resource consumption.The United States is the world's leading consumer nation. If its population continues to soar -- it has risen by one-third since 1970 -- consumption will mushroom and environmental pressures will multiply.
FEATURES
By John Javna and John Javna,The EarthWorks Group | April 27, 1991
OK, everybody sing along: Happy Earth Day to you, happy Earth Day to you, happy Earth Day dear planet, happy Earth Day to-o-o-o yoo-oo-oo--ou.Earth Day was 21 years old on Monday, April 22. That means it's legally an adult.But does that mean it has to take care of itself from now on? A lot of people seem to think so. Certainly, large portions of the media are sitting this one out.But you don't have to. In fact, Earth Day 1991 is a chance to prove to yourself that media hype and Time magazine covers aren't the reason you got involved with the environmental movement in the first place.
NEWS
By Phil Kent | October 13, 2003
ATLANTA - As economists and the government attempt to solve America's unemployment woes, the rest of us should be aware that there is an environmental movement that threatens thousands of American jobs - the anti-SUV movement. The auto industry is responsible for creating and/or maintaining roughly 6.6 million jobs nationwide, more than 5 percent of all private sector jobs in the United States today. And, unless you haven't parked at your local grocery store or driven on the highway in the last 10 years, you will not be surprised to find that light trucks (pickups, vans and SUVs)
NEWS
By Fred Tutman | November 28, 2011
As an African-American and an environmentalist, I went along for a long while with the idea that race and class are irrelevant to the cause of environmental protection. I assumed that the environment itself is connective and bridges the social divide. But I can no longer ignore that a color-blind, class-blind environmental movement is also too often blind to the needs of those with the least access to clean air, water and land. By ignoring the obvious social divisions in society, a relatively non-inclusive green movement has emerged.
NEWS
April 20, 2011
Friday marks the 41 s t anniversary of Earth Day and provides the customary opportunity to take stock of the environmental movement in this country. Unfortunately, for all the talk of the greening of America, it's been a pretty rotten 12 months for the planet and its defenders. Just look at the bookend events: A year ago this week, the Gulf of Mexico suffered the worst offshore oil spill in U.S. history. Whatever the lessons learned from that trauma, it hasn't resulted in big changes to the country's oil-dependent energy strategies.
FEATURES
By McClatchy-Tribune | April 16, 2007
KANSAS CITY, Mo. -- Simran Sethi knows what the stereotype of the environmental movement used to be. "Hemp-wearing, yurt-living, off-the-grid hippies," she said. "Either that or upper-middle-class white males. Those were pretty limited definitions of environmentalists - and none of them were any fun." On TV The Green premieres at 9 p.m. tomorrow on the Sundance Channel.
TOPIC
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | June 12, 2005
After President Bush's re-election victory in November, many political commentators pondered whether environmentalism was dead because it seemed to have become a narrow, liberal special interest with no appeal in red-state America. But there is mounting evidence that left-leaning nature lovers can gain significant national political influence by forming an unlikely alliance with conservative middle-class hunters. What do hunters and environmentalists have in common? They have a similar anger over activities of developers and drillers - business interests that would inalterably change the face of forests and wetlands treasured by people on both sides of the cultural divide.
NEWS
By Phil Kent | October 13, 2003
ATLANTA - As economists and the government attempt to solve America's unemployment woes, the rest of us should be aware that there is an environmental movement that threatens thousands of American jobs - the anti-SUV movement. The auto industry is responsible for creating and/or maintaining roughly 6.6 million jobs nationwide, more than 5 percent of all private sector jobs in the United States today. And, unless you haven't parked at your local grocery store or driven on the highway in the last 10 years, you will not be surprised to find that light trucks (pickups, vans and SUVs)
TOPIC
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | July 28, 2002
IT IS SUMMERTIME and the skies are angry, filled with smoke from forest fires, the greenhouse gases building up almost before your eyes, the fragile ozone layer barely protecting humanity from the sun's destructive rays. Soon, perhaps, a melting ice cap will put your favorite beach resort under water. Then, you will turn on your tap and no water will come out. The reservoirs will be dry. Since the environmental movement first gained strength 30 years ago, predictions of the demise of the world as we know it have been a staple.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 16, 2002
OAKLAND, Calif. - When the pipe bomb went off in their Subaru station wagon in May 1990, Judi Bari and Darryl Cherney were in Oakland, driving from California's north coast to stir up support for demonstrations planned for that summer to stop the logging of ancient redwood trees. Almost immediately, they concluded that someone had tried to kill them. They were, after all, rabble-rousing leaders of the Earth First! movement, which had clashed repeatedly with loggers by blocking logging trucks, sitting in trees and shouting at rallies.
BUSINESS
By Gary Cohn and Gary Cohn,Staff Writer | January 29, 1994
The late Thurgood Marshall is best known as a champion of the civil rights movement. What isn't as well known, though, is that Justice Marshall also was a stalwart of the environmental movement that grew up during his 24 years on the U.S. Supreme Court.That is the conclusion of Robert Percival, a professor at the University of Maryland School of Law who spent two months last summer poring through Thurgood Marshall's papers at the Library of Congress. The papers were made public last year, providing law professors, historians and reporters with an unusually detailed view of the inner workings of the court.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 16, 2002
OAKLAND, Calif. - When the pipe bomb went off in their Subaru station wagon in May 1990, Judi Bari and Darryl Cherney were in Oakland, driving from California's north coast to stir up support for demonstrations planned for that summer to stop the logging of ancient redwood trees. Almost immediately, they concluded that someone had tried to kill them. They were, after all, rabble-rousing leaders of the Earth First! movement, which had clashed repeatedly with loggers by blocking logging trucks, sitting in trees and shouting at rallies.
NEWS
April 22, 2001
THE ENVIRONMENTAL movement in the United States was in its infancy, searching for a way to link diverse, seemingly disconnected interests. The first Earth Day was yet to dawn. The civic-minded Junior League held a national conference on environmental issues. Alice "Ajax" Eastman, already active in charity projects for the Baltimore chapter, attended the Chicago meeting with friend Virginia Mock. They returned to survey Maryland's environmental needs and determined to revive an old idea: the returnable, mandatory-deposit beverage container.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.