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BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | January 24, 2002
Michael Powell, a business lobbyist in Annapolis, recalls that he received worried calls from clients last summer after they heard that a Democrat from tree-hugging Montgomery County would take over the chairmanship of an important House committee. Del. John A. Hurson had just been named to succeed their old friend Del. Ron Guns, one of the most conservative Democrats in the House, to head the Environmental Matters Committee. "A lot of the business people simply did not know John Hurson except that he was from Montgomery County," said Powell, who represents a coalition of chemical makers and users.
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NEWS
February 9, 2007
Delegate would add raven as a state bird For the past 60 years, the Baltimore Oriole has been Maryland's sole state bird. Quoth a Baltimore delegate, "Nevermore." Del. Nathaniel T. Oaks introduced a bill yesterday that would make the raven the second state bird of Maryland. Oaks, a Democrat who also introduced the measure in 2001 and 2003, said that it makes sense for Maryland to recognize both of its avian mascots. Elementary school children from Edmondson Village first proposed the idea to him few years ago after he told them how bills are made into law, Oaks said.
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NEWS
January 9, 1991
Noon -- 1991 General Assembly convenes, House and Senate chambers.1 p.m. -- House Environmental Matters Committee receives briefings on agricultural, natural resources, farm and Chesapeake Bay issues, Room 160, House Office Building.There are 89 days remaining in the 1991 General Assembly session.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | December 3, 2004
A legislator critical of the Ehrlich administration's aborted plan to sell St. Mary's County preservation land to a construction company owner requested yesterday that the state assign a prosecutor to investigate the deal. Del. Peter Franchot, a Montgomery County Democrat, said the General Assembly has done as much as it can to investigate the state's plan to sell the forest land to Whiting-Turner Chief Executive Officer Willard J. Hackerman. Hackerman promised to preserve the land in exchange for tax breaks of as much as $7 million, but state documents indicate that he intended to develop at least part of it. "Getting information from the Ehrlich administration on this subject is like getting blood from a stone," said Franchot, one of the governor's most vocal critics.
NEWS
October 18, 1997
An article in yesterday's editions of The Sun about the governor's blue-ribbon commission on Pfiesteria gave incorrect information about its schedule. Meetings will be held at 7 p.m. Tuesday, 9: 30 a.m. Thursday, 9 a.m. Oct. 27 and 9 a.m. Oct. 29 in the Environmental Matters Committee chambers, Lowe House Office Building, Annapolis.The Sun regrets the error.Pub Date: 10/18/97
SPORTS
By Bill Burton | March 19, 1991
The Environmental Matters Committee of the House of Delegates killed a bill that would have banned gill-netting for rockfish in Maryland. House Bill 1189 fostered by the Maryland Saltwater Sportsfishermens Association would have compensated netters in a one-time payout of from $7,000 to $10,000 for giving up their gear.The vote was 14 to 4. MSSA executive director Rich Novotnsaid a somewhat modified bill would be back next year. Still under committee consideration in the Senate is SB575 to designate rockfish a gamefish, which, in effect, would ban all commercial fishing for and the sale of wild rockfish in Maryland.
NEWS
October 17, 1997
An article in yesterday's editions of The Sun about the governor's blue-ribbon commission on Pfiesteria gave incorrect information about its schedule. Meetings will be held at 7 p.m. Tuesday, 9: 30 a.m. Thursday, 9 a.m. Oct. 27 and 9 a.m. Oct. 29 in the Environmental Matters Committee chambers, Lowe House Office Building, Annapolis.The Sun regrets the error.A governor's commission was to meet today in Annapolis to hear Donald F. Boeschof the University of Maryland's Center for Environmental Sciencediscuss blooms of Pfiesteria piscicida in bay tributaries.
NEWS
February 12, 1991
Quote of the day"If we have a fee, we've raised it."-- Schaefer administration officialreferring to proposed gas tax and motor vehicle fee increasesTodayA510 a.m.: House and Senate convene, State House.1 p.m.: Senate Judicial Proceedings Committee considers Schaefer administration bill to charge parolees a fee for their ownsupervision, Room 300, Senate Office Building.1 p.m.: House Environmental Matters Committee considers revisions to the state's vehicle emissions inspection program, Room 160, House Office Building.
NEWS
By Legislative Reference/CARROLL COUNTY SUN GRAPHIC | April 14, 1991
* QUARRIES: Presumes quarry companies liable for damages to water supplies and property near their operations (Delegates Richard N. Dixon, Donald B. Elliott): 1988: Applies only in Carroll County; withdrawnfrom House Judiciary Committee; 1989: Sets sphere of responsibility within 1-mile radius of quarries in Carroll County; passed House, died in Senate Judicial Proceedings Committee; 1990: Requires Departmentof Natural Resources to determine scientifically a "zone of influence" around quarries; applies statewide; killed by House Environmental Matters Committee; a second bill identical to 1989 version introduced; killed by Judiciary; 1991 Requires DNR to delineate "zone of influence"; lessens standard of proof for land damages; applies only in Carroll, Baltimore, Frederick and Washington counties; does not apply tofuture development within zone; passed House and Senate.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | February 4, 2004
Karen DiMario hadn't lived in an apartment a single day in her life. But in the four months since the flood waters of Tropical Storm Isabel wiped out the home on Dundalk's Bear Creek that she and her husband had shared for 14 years, she has found herself driving every night to a place that feels like anything but home. "We're no better off than we were the day after the storm," she said. The DiMarios and dozens of other Isabel victims from Anne Arundel and Baltimore counties packed a committee room in Annapolis yesterday to support two proposals that state lawmakers say would help them obtain financing to rebuild or rehabilitate their homes.
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | March 20, 2003
A bid to expand the Carroll board of commissioners from three to five members cleared its first hurdle in the General Assembly yesterday when a House committee raised no objections to the proposal. The bill, supported unanimously by the county delegation, is expected to be voted upon this week by the full House of Delegates. If passed, the bill would put the board expansion to a countywide vote next year. If approved by county voters, the expansion would become effective in 2006. Yesterday, Del. Donald B. Elliott, who introduced the legislation, told the House Environmental Matters Committee that a three-member board of commissioners can no longer meet the needs of a rapidly growing county.
NEWS
February 4, 2003
Today's highlights 10 a.m. Senate meets, Senate chamber. 10 a.m. House of Delegates meets, House chamber. 1 p.m. Hearing on banning the use of hand-held telephones while driving, House Environmental Matters Committee, Room 140, Lowe House Office Building.
NEWS
By Tim Craig and Tim Craig,SUN STAFF | March 26, 2002
Several of Gov. Parris N. Glendening's environmental protection bills advanced in the General Assembly yesterday, including legislation to protect the state's five coastal bays from future development. But a Glendening proposal to increase penalties for air polluters was defeated during the weekend by the House Environmental Matters Committee, the same panel that two weeks ago defeated the governor's attempt to raise fines for water pollution. Glendening spokesman Michael E. Morrill said overall the administration is satisfied with the General Assembly's actions, particularly yesterday's votes on legislation to protect coastal bays and clarify the state's "critical areas" law. The Senate voted 33-12 to approve a bill that would extend to the coastal bays in rapidly growing Worchester County the same protections from development already in place along the Chesapeake Bay and its tributaries.
BUSINESS
By Ivan Penn and Michael Dresser and Ivan Penn and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | February 7, 2002
A prominent state delegate has recused himself from legislation involving CareFirst BlueCross Blue Shield's proposed conversion to a for-profit company, and the General Assembly's ethics committee is looking at whether a second House leader should do the same. Del. John A. Hurson, chairman of the House Environmental Matters Committee and former majority leader, withdrew Jan. 2 from participating in discussions or voting on legislation related to the CareFirst conversion plan. His full-time job is with Ketchum Public Relations in Washington, which CareFirst recently hired for a publicity blitz supporting the plan.
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | January 24, 2002
Michael Powell, a business lobbyist in Annapolis, recalls that he received worried calls from clients last summer after they heard that a Democrat from tree-hugging Montgomery County would take over the chairmanship of an important House committee. Del. John A. Hurson had just been named to succeed their old friend Del. Ron Guns, one of the most conservative Democrats in the House, to head the Environmental Matters Committee. "A lot of the business people simply did not know John Hurson except that he was from Montgomery County," said Powell, who represents a coalition of chemical makers and users.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | June 21, 2001
Gov. Parris N. Glendening deftly cleared an obstruction to his environmental agenda yesterday by naming a longtime legislative adversary to a powerful regulatory position. Del. Ron Guns, a conservative Cecil County Democrat, will quit the General Assembly and resign from his full-time job with telecommunications giant Verizon to fill a vacancy on the state Public Service Commission. The position pays $93,600 a year. Since 1991, Guns has served as chairman of the House Environmental Matters Committee, which had become a graveyard for bills on water quality and other environmental issues.
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