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Tim Wheeler | March 5, 2014
How can Baltimoreans "strive for environmental justice for all citizens, particularly in the face of climate change?" That's one of the central questions to be tackled Thursday evening at a forum put on by the Friends of Maryland's Olmsted Parks & Landscapes .  A panel of three speakers will address "the Olmsted Challenge: Fostering Environmental Justice for a More Humane City. " Scheduled speakers are: Scot Spencer of the Annie E. Casey Foundation; Kristin Baja of the city's Office of Sustainability and Morgan Grove, a research scientist with the U.S. Forest Service.
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NEWS
Staff Reports | May 15, 2014
Kurt L. Schmoke, the former mayor of Baltimore who will take over the presidency of University of Baltimore in July, will address graduates and their families at Anne Arundel Community College's 52nd Commencement at 7 p.m. Thursday, May 22. Schmoke has worked in law, education and public service, most recently as general counsel and interim provost at Howard University. On May 14, the University System Maryland Board of Regents announced Schmoke's appointment as president of University of Baltimore, effective July 1. Schmoke earned an undergraduate degree in history from Yale University.
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NEWS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,SUN STAFF | March 9, 2001
With the plight of the residents of industrialized Wagner's Point in mind, Gov. Parris N. Glendening is creating a commission to make sure poor communities aren't overwhelmed by noxious industries. The 15-member Commission on Environmental Justice and Sustainable Communities will be designed to give residents of Maryland's poorer communities a say in what happens in their neighborhoods, the governor said yesterday. "There are communities that tend to be politically less powerful because the family members are too busy struggling for survival.
NEWS
Tim Wheeler | March 5, 2014
How can Baltimoreans "strive for environmental justice for all citizens, particularly in the face of climate change?" That's one of the central questions to be tackled Thursday evening at a forum put on by the Friends of Maryland's Olmsted Parks & Landscapes .  A panel of three speakers will address "the Olmsted Challenge: Fostering Environmental Justice for a More Humane City. " Scheduled speakers are: Scot Spencer of the Annie E. Casey Foundation; Kristin Baja of the city's Office of Sustainability and Morgan Grove, a research scientist with the U.S. Forest Service.
NEWS
By Adam Sachs and Adam Sachs,Staff Writer | October 12, 1993
Glen Gaskins says his bank account has "gone south," but his spirits have risen since he left the corporate world to educate children in environmental issues and advocate "environmental justice."Mr. Gaskins says his nonprofit organization, Environmental Education Concepts Inc., is "not financially lucrative. But you can't enjoy anything more. I'm out of the corporate loop and don't have the corporate pressure and politics. I enjoy the shot of adrenalin I get listening to kids and hearing their enthusiasm."
NEWS
By Adam Sachs and Adam Sachs,Staff Writer | October 12, 1993
Glen Gaskins says his bank account has "gone south," but his spirits have risen since he left the corporate world to educate children in environmental issues and advocate "environmental justice."Mr. Gaskins says his nonprofit organization, Environmental Education Concepts Inc., is "not financially lucrative. But you can't enjoy anything more. I'm out of the corporate loop and don't have the corporate pressure and politics. I enjoy the shot of adrenalin I get listening to kids and hearing their enthusiasm."
NEWS
Staff Reports | May 15, 2014
Kurt L. Schmoke, the former mayor of Baltimore who will take over the presidency of University of Baltimore in July, will address graduates and their families at Anne Arundel Community College's 52nd Commencement at 7 p.m. Thursday, May 22. Schmoke has worked in law, education and public service, most recently as general counsel and interim provost at Howard University. On May 14, the University System Maryland Board of Regents announced Schmoke's appointment as president of University of Baltimore, effective July 1. Schmoke earned an undergraduate degree in history from Yale University.
NEWS
By Kevin Philpy | June 19, 2013
I read with great interest The Sun's recent article about the reaction of churches that are protesting the soon-to-be instituted stormwater fee. The work being done by the churches named in the article is commendable - food pantries, assistance to the homeless, and the like - and their work to keep their ministries solvent in a difficult economy is certainly not easy. Having been part of the denominational church for my entire life, I understand that there's only so much money to go around, and that it's impossible to help every person in need, but that God commands us to try to do so anyway.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | July 10, 1996
Wearing the latest in personal air monitors, with a clear plastic hose draped over her shoulder, Gia Grier caught other passengers staring at her as she rode the city bus to Western High School in North Baltimore this week."
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | December 11, 1997
It was an unusual position for an environmentalist: testifying against the Sierra Club and in favor of a developer planning to build a theme park on islands of wooded parkland in the Anacostia River.But when Norris McDonald, president of the Annapolis-based African American Environmentalist Association, took the microphone in the District of Columbia's City Council chamber Oct. 20, he made it clear he's far from the usual environmentalist.While six conservation groups protested the Children's Island entertainment complex proposed for Kingman and Heritage islands, McDonald, a 40-year-old former Capitol Hill lobbyist, supported the project as a way to add jobs, theaters and life to a poor black neighborhood.
NEWS
By Kevin Philpy | June 19, 2013
I read with great interest The Sun's recent article about the reaction of churches that are protesting the soon-to-be instituted stormwater fee. The work being done by the churches named in the article is commendable - food pantries, assistance to the homeless, and the like - and their work to keep their ministries solvent in a difficult economy is certainly not easy. Having been part of the denominational church for my entire life, I understand that there's only so much money to go around, and that it's impossible to help every person in need, but that God commands us to try to do so anyway.
NEWS
March 14, 2013
Newly elected Pope Francis represents change in many respects. He is the first pope from the New World (and the first from outside of Europe in 1,200 years), the first Jesuit and the first Francis. But for American Catholics, who in poll after poll in recent weeks have expressed disagreement with the church's stances on the ordination of women or the requirement of celibacy for priests, he may seem like more of the same. Pope Francis, the former Cardinal Jorge Mario Bergoglio of Buenos Aires, is a doctrinaire conservative in those matters, as were Pope Benedict XVI and Pope John Paul II before him. Given the views of the College of Cardinals - all of whom were appointed by John Paul or Benedict - it could hardly have been otherwise.
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | July 19, 2002
This is the first of several columns between now and November on environmental issues the candidates for governor ought to be discussing. It's early in the campaign, but neither Bob Ehrlich nor Kathleen Kennedy Townsend, the leading Republican and Democratic contenders, has indicated a willingness to make a major priority of improving our air, water and land-use problems. Last week, I visited with outgoing Gov. Parris N. Glendening to discuss what he'd focus on if he had another term or two. Glendening, for most of his eight years, has given the environment high priority.
NEWS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,SUN STAFF | March 9, 2001
With the plight of the residents of industrialized Wagner's Point in mind, Gov. Parris N. Glendening is creating a commission to make sure poor communities aren't overwhelmed by noxious industries. The 15-member Commission on Environmental Justice and Sustainable Communities will be designed to give residents of Maryland's poorer communities a say in what happens in their neighborhoods, the governor said yesterday. "There are communities that tend to be politically less powerful because the family members are too busy struggling for survival.
NEWS
By Raymond Hernandez and Raymond Hernandez,New York Times News Service | September 29, 1999
ALBANY, N.Y. -- Environmental activist Aaron Maier surveyed the abandoned industrial plant that blights his poor neighborhood here on the banks of the Hudson River. The lot, vacant but for an abandoned factory building, was overrun by weeds, and the soil was soaked with toxic chemicals.A few years ago, he would have called for the standard environmentalist's prescription: Clean up the property thoroughly, no matter what the cost to business or government. But today, Maier is convinced that that approach has frightened off potential developers and left old industrial tracts like the one here orphaned.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | December 11, 1997
It was an unusual position for an environmentalist: testifying against the Sierra Club and in favor of a developer planning to build a theme park on islands of wooded parkland in the Anacostia River.But when Norris McDonald, president of the Annapolis-based African American Environmentalist Association, took the microphone in the District of Columbia's City Council chamber Oct. 20, he made it clear he's far from the usual environmentalist.While six conservation groups protested the Children's Island entertainment complex proposed for Kingman and Heritage islands, McDonald, a 40-year-old former Capitol Hill lobbyist, supported the project as a way to add jobs, theaters and life to a poor black neighborhood.
NEWS
By Raymond Hernandez and Raymond Hernandez,New York Times News Service | September 29, 1999
ALBANY, N.Y. -- Environmental activist Aaron Maier surveyed the abandoned industrial plant that blights his poor neighborhood here on the banks of the Hudson River. The lot, vacant but for an abandoned factory building, was overrun by weeds, and the soil was soaked with toxic chemicals.A few years ago, he would have called for the standard environmentalist's prescription: Clean up the property thoroughly, no matter what the cost to business or government. But today, Maier is convinced that that approach has frightened off potential developers and left old industrial tracts like the one here orphaned.
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | July 19, 2002
This is the first of several columns between now and November on environmental issues the candidates for governor ought to be discussing. It's early in the campaign, but neither Bob Ehrlich nor Kathleen Kennedy Townsend, the leading Republican and Democratic contenders, has indicated a willingness to make a major priority of improving our air, water and land-use problems. Last week, I visited with outgoing Gov. Parris N. Glendening to discuss what he'd focus on if he had another term or two. Glendening, for most of his eight years, has given the environment high priority.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | July 10, 1996
Wearing the latest in personal air monitors, with a clear plastic hose draped over her shoulder, Gia Grier caught other passengers staring at her as she rode the city bus to Western High School in North Baltimore this week."
NEWS
By Adam Sachs and Adam Sachs,Staff Writer | October 12, 1993
Glen Gaskins says his bank account has "gone south," but his spirits have risen since he left the corporate world to educate children in environmental issues and advocate "environmental justice."Mr. Gaskins says his nonprofit organization, Environmental Education Concepts Inc., is "not financially lucrative. But you can't enjoy anything more. I'm out of the corporate loop and don't have the corporate pressure and politics. I enjoy the shot of adrenalin I get listening to kids and hearing their enthusiasm."
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