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NEWS
August 9, 2013
While discussion of the redevelopment of Harbor Point is centered on city-provided tax incentives, potential safety issues are virtually ignored ( "City Council committee approves aid for Harbor Point development," Aug. 8). Announced plans to break the encapsulation of the carcinogenic hexavalent chromium are unprecedented. An experiment with dangerous materials in the midst of any population center is alarming. Why no discussion? One has to wonder if the tax increment financing discussion is designed as a distraction.
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NEWS
By Will FespermanThe Baltimore Sun | June 20, 2014
Climate change has a communication problem, according to Maris St. Cyr, a representative of the Maryland League of Conservation Voters. "We need to make [climate change] a personal issue. That is when people react; when it is personal. " St. Cyr was one of more than two dozen public officials and environmental advocates at a roundtable on climate change led by U.S. Sen. Ben Cardin on Friday at the Maryland Science Center . The group discussed how to reframe environmental issues in a way that, they hoped, would appeal to conservatives and galvanize the public to action.
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NEWS
By Heather Dewar and Heather Dewar,SUN STAFF | May 8, 1998
Said city student Kristin Harrison to suburbanite Ebony Custis: "Sprawl -- what is that?"Said Custis, from Bowie, to Harrison, from Baltimore: "I can't believe what you're saying about people illegally dumping trash in the neighborhoods. Is that for real?"They met in a drab conference room at the Baltimore Convention Center yesterday, two of the 900 environmentally aware students and teachers who attended the governor's first Youth Environmental Summit.At first the two 18-year-olds thought their worries were unrelated.
NEWS
May 30, 2014
As primary elections approach in Maryland, one begins to research the candidates and their issues; as someone especially aware of environmental issues, I think the choice is clear regarding who would best lead Maryland as its next governor. And I think The Sun does, too. Was it her decision to take public funding for her campaign rather than accept who knows how much from who knows which corporations? Or was it her strong stance against fracking and Cove Point? Her plan for better education and equal opportunity throughout the state?
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 23, 2004
HOUSTON - The Bush and Kerry campaigns marked Earth Day yesterday by trading charges about which candidate is the planet's better friend. Democratic Sen. John Kerry wrapped up a three-day environmental issues tour with a rally in one of President Bush's former Texas hometowns to criticize the president's record. "Some things just weren't meant for recycling," Kerry said of re-electing Bush. But he told that crowd, "You've got to give George Bush credit because he has actually proven himself very good at recycling.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | March 16, 2004
As many as 450 cyclists will bring their mountain bikes and environmental issues to Carroll County in June. The International Mountain Bicycling Association, which has 32,000 members worldwide, has chosen McDaniel College in Westminster for its 2004 IMBA Mountain Bike Advocacy Summit. "This was a real coup to get this group here," said Barbara Beverungen, county director of tourism. "They are international and will be bringing people from all over the country and the world." The conference is set for June 4-8 at McDaniel College, with many participants staying in college housing and nearby hotels.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Staff Writer | January 31, 1993
The Carroll delegation's voting record on environmental issues ranked among the worst in the state during the 1991-1992 legislative session, says an environmental coalition.Sen. Charles H. Smelser, D-Carroll, Frederick and Howard, received the lowest score possible -- 0 percent -- ranking him among the worst in the General Assembly on the report card of the Maryland League of Conservation Voters Inc., which represents a number of environmental organizations.Mr. Smelser's office said Friday that the senator was unfamiliar with the report and had no comment.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | January 9, 2005
Maryland voters are increasingly concerned about the health of their rivers, forests and air, are against the rapid introduction of non-native oysters into the Chesapeake Bay, and oppose the sale of state preservation land, the Sun Poll released today shows. In a state dominated by the bay, voters are showing a growing awareness and concern for environmental issues, according to the survey of 800 registered voters conducted for The Sun last week. Behind education, health care and the state budget, respondents said the environment was the issue they most wanted the governor and General Assembly to address in the 90-day session that begins this week.
NEWS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,SUN STAFF | August 7, 2001
If you want to use the Chesapeake Bay in your lesson plans, you have to experience it first: on the deck of a skipjack in the brutal heat of an August day or on tiny Fox Island in Tangier Sound. You have to hear bay troubadour Tom Wisner sing of the rivers Susquehanna, Wicomico, Severn and Nanticoke, and listen to Earl White, the 83-year-old mate on the Stanley Norman, tell of his days oystering aboard the graceful, 63-foot-long "drudge" boat to get a sense of the history and lore. And you have to get a "bay shower," a bucket of water pulled from the Chesapeake and dumped over your head to cool you off. So nine teachers and two principals boarded the Chesapeake Bay Foundation's Stanley Norman at City Dock in Annapolis yesterday for the first day of a weeklong program in which they will dredge for oysters, set crab pots, explore the marshes of Smith, Tangier and Fox islands, and hear from scientists, watermen and others connected with the bay as part of a teacher training program.
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | July 19, 2002
This is the first of several columns between now and November on environmental issues the candidates for governor ought to be discussing. It's early in the campaign, but neither Bob Ehrlich nor Kathleen Kennedy Townsend, the leading Republican and Democratic contenders, has indicated a willingness to make a major priority of improving our air, water and land-use problems. Last week, I visited with outgoing Gov. Parris N. Glendening to discuss what he'd focus on if he had another term or two. Glendening, for most of his eight years, has given the environment high priority.
NEWS
January 17, 2014
The last five paragraphs of Peter Morici's commentary regarding the need to reduce oil imports and grow the economy faster make a lot of sense ("Inequality is the new norm in the U.S.," Jan. 15). I know the left's arguments against being energy independent are because of environmental issues. But the common sense view is that 6 million gallons imported or 6 million gallons produced here in the United States has the same environmental impact to the world. I would much prefer American technology protecting us than other countries'.
NEWS
svanessen2@hotmail.com | November 5, 2013
The Rev. Mary Gaut has been accepted as a 2014 fellow by GreenFaith, an interfaith organization promoting environmental stewardship. The GreenFaith website says "the Fellowship Program is the first comprehensive education and training program in the US to prepare lay and ordained leaders from diverse religious traditions for religiously based environmental leadership. The Fellowship curriculum is designed to integrate historical perspectives, scientific information, socio-economic considerations, religious, ethical, spiritual and practical dimensions.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | October 31, 2013
A public meeting on environmental safeguards for redeveloping a Fells Point former factory site has been reset for Nov. 14, Baltimore City Council member James B. Kraft has announced. The meeting on the Harbor Point project is to be held from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. in the Morgan Stanley building at 1300 Thames St. The session, which was postponed from last month because of the federal government shutdown, will cover plans by Beatty Development Group to build a 22-story tower on the site of the former Allied chromium processing plant.
NEWS
By Tom Horton | September 3, 2013
What if they held an environmental crisis and no one cared? What if a law moving through Congress would significantly harm clean water, open space, the Chesapeake Bay? You'd hear the alarms, strong and clear, from the largest national groups to the smallest Chesapeake organizations. But you won't in this case, because this law is "only" about population - about significantly increasing the number of people who will be living in the United States and around the Chesapeake. The law, which has passed the U.S. Senate and gone to the House with broad, bipartisan backing, is a comprehensive reform of our outdated immigration laws.
NEWS
August 9, 2013
While discussion of the redevelopment of Harbor Point is centered on city-provided tax incentives, potential safety issues are virtually ignored ( "City Council committee approves aid for Harbor Point development," Aug. 8). Announced plans to break the encapsulation of the carcinogenic hexavalent chromium are unprecedented. An experiment with dangerous materials in the midst of any population center is alarming. Why no discussion? One has to wonder if the tax increment financing discussion is designed as a distraction.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 3, 2013
Louise W. Stump, an accomplished competitive equestrian who continued riding until she was in her mid-70s, died Monday of complications from Alzheimer's disease at Springwell, a Mount Washington senior living community. The longtime Reisterstown resident was 82. Louise Warfield was born in Baltimore, the daughter of Edwin Warfield Jr., a banker who had been publisher of The Daily Record, and Katharine Lawrence Lee. She was raised at Oakdale, her family's estate in Woodbine that had been home to her grandfather, Edward Warfield, who had been governor of Maryland from 1904 to 1908.
NEWS
By Tim Craig and Tim Craig,SUN STAFF | September 6, 2002
A cast of unlikely political allies strode into Lexington Market to defend William Donald Schaefer yesterday, decrying Gov. Parris N. Glendening's tactics against the comptroller and jokingly comparing his adversaries to the slimy creatures in the fishmongers' cases. During a noontime campaign swing through Baltimore, some Democrats put aside their differences to embrace Schaefer and scold Glendening for recent attacks - the latest of which is a new radio ad labeling Schaefer as "missing in action" on environmental issues.
NEWS
October 30, 1990
In last week's endorsement editorials for Carroll and Baltimore counties, we neglected to discuss the race for the single delegate seat in District 5B, which takes in a part of Owings Mills and the southeast corner of Carroll.We endorse Democratic Del. Lawrence A. LaMotte, who has done a first-rate job for the region on health and environmental issues, over Republican Albert I. Craemer.
NEWS
October 18, 2012
Last month, a Republican-aligned polling firm called on hunters and fishermen nationwide to get their views. Some of the results were unsurprising: Outdoorsmen regard themselves as politically conservative and register Republican over Democratic by a more than 2-to-1 ratio. But here's one response that may have caught President Barack Obama and his re-election team by surprise, if they noticed it at all: A majority of these sportsmen believe global warming is the cause of this past summer's high temperatures and want the White House and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to limit carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gas emissions.
NEWS
April 5, 2012
There is no reason that the U.S. shouldn't be energy independent in 10 years. Yes, we would have to drill some more, but as Peter Morici points out ("Obama's bad bet," April 3), we would manage the environmental issues much better than others. The geopolitical and economic upside would be enormous. Solar (I do have a solar-powered water heater) and wind can be good supplements, but we have to wean ourselves from being dependent on Middle East and Latin American countries. Lyle Rescott, Marriottsville
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