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Environmental Impact

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NEWS
November 16, 2010
The Nov.16 Commentary piece by Mark Olsthoorn, "A sensible shale gas policy," was remarkable for what it omitted. After reading about Mr. Olsthoorn's work in the Netherlands on sustainability, I am flabbergasted that he managed to write a whole piece on extracting natural gas without once mentioning the unconscionably high price that comes with this "clean" energy. He mentions hydraulic fracturing without telling readers that the toxic stew pumped into the earth to unlock this gas is polluting the drinking water of millions of Americans.
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NEWS
By Stephen Waldron and Capital News Service | October 9, 2014
State and federal officials visited Folger McKinsey Elementary School in Severna Park this week to review the school's efforts to teach students about the environment - and reduce its own environmental impact. Folger McKinsey was recognized as a Green Ribbon School by the U.S. Department of Education in 2012. The award is given to schools working to reduce their environmental impact and provide effective environmental education for students. The visit, part of the Department of Education's annual nationwide tour of current and former Green Ribbon Schools, included officials from the education department, the state Board of Education and the Maryland House of Delegates.
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NEWS
September 6, 2013
The main point to be drawn from Tom Horton's article about immigration's impact on the Chesapeake Bay region is that there's no way to separate population problems from environmental problems, and vice versa ("Immigration's impact," Sept. 3). Advocates for both issues have failed to acknowledge this fact for far too long, but the hot-button issue of immigration makes it impossible for them to continue to maintain their distance. As Mr. Horton noted, whatever the merits of immigration reform, immigration will remain the primary factor in U.S. population growth, which, if present rates continue, will swell from our present 315 million to some 445 million by mid-century.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | August 27, 2014
A Washington-area trail users' group and a pair of environmental advocates have filed suit to block the Purple Line , contending the $2.4 billion light-rail project in the DC suburbs threatens to harm two species of endangered crustaceans that live in the creek the transit line would cross. The Friends of the Capital Crescent Trail and John M. Fitzgerald and Christine Real de Azua of Chevy Chase asked the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia Tuesday to overturn clearance given the project earlier this year by the Federal Transit Administration and require federal agencies to explore alternate routes for the rail line.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | August 27, 2014
A Washington-area trail users' group and a pair of environmental advocates have filed suit to block the Purple Line , contending the $2.4 billion light-rail project in the DC suburbs threatens to harm two species of endangered crustaceans that live in the creek the transit line would cross. The Friends of the Capital Crescent Trail and John M. Fitzgerald and Christine Real de Azua of Chevy Chase asked the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia Tuesday to overturn clearance given the project earlier this year by the Federal Transit Administration and require federal agencies to explore alternate routes for the rail line.
EXPLORE
November 28, 2011
I've read several accounts of the proposed artificial turf fields for the county high schools. None has addressed the possible adverse environmental impact of the product, especially when spread across several county high school fields. It isn't necessarily something we should automatically promote. From what I've read about artificial turf, it not only poses a higher risk of injury to the kids who play on it than natural turf, it can leach carcinogens into the local ground water, and long-term, even costs more to maintain.
NEWS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,SUN STAFF | January 28, 2004
A committee is being formed to examine ways that Carroll County government can implement more environmentally sound and efficient practices in constructing and maintaining its facilities. In a presentation yesterday before the county commissioners, a Maryland Department of Natural Resources planner described how local governments can minimize environmental impact in designing, constructing, operating and maintaining their buildings. Called "sustainable development," such techniques use the structure and surrounding natural resources in every aspect of design and construction, said Sean McGuire of DNR's Environmental Design Program.
NEWS
By Phillip McGowan and Phillip McGowan,sun reporter | February 7, 2007
Fort Meade is proposing to build a sewage sludge incinerator, a prospect that has drawn outrage among western Anne Arundel County civic leaders and criticism from the county's top health official about the potential environmental and health impacts. The Maryland Department of the Environment is holding a public hearing tonight in Odenton to discuss plans by a Tennessee contractor, Ameresco Federal Solutions, to build the incinerator near the Army post's sewage plant adjacent to the intersection of Routes 32 and 198. The incinerator would run 24 hours a day on weekdays, disposing of hundreds of tons of sewage a year more cheaply than by trucking the waste away, county and Fort Meade officials said.
NEWS
By Neil J. Pedersen | October 10, 2008
Despite recent claims to the contrary, Maryland's Intercounty Connector - expensive though it surely is, at $2.4 billion - will deliver a very strong return on investment to Maryland residents, including many residents of the Baltimore metropolitan area. According to U.S. Census data, more than 130,000 people from greater Baltimore commute to the Washington area every day, many to jobs on the Interstate 270 technology corridor. Traffic forecasting illustrates the enormous benefit these travelers will experience from the ICC. The ICC will provide a much-needed link from BWI Thurgood Marshall Airport to the Washington metropolitan region, ensuring long-term economic benefits for Maryland.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | August 31, 2012
So racing returns to downtown streets today, as the Grand Prix of Baltimore takes over the Inner Harbor and Camden Yards through Sunday. The new organizers of the revived racing festival have managed to avoid the tempest over tree removal that dogged the runup to last year's inaugural event.  But they've also dropped any pretense of reducing or mitigating the noise, unfiltered racecar exhaust and other environmental impacts of the extravaganza....
NEWS
September 6, 2013
The main point to be drawn from Tom Horton's article about immigration's impact on the Chesapeake Bay region is that there's no way to separate population problems from environmental problems, and vice versa ("Immigration's impact," Sept. 3). Advocates for both issues have failed to acknowledge this fact for far too long, but the hot-button issue of immigration makes it impossible for them to continue to maintain their distance. As Mr. Horton noted, whatever the merits of immigration reform, immigration will remain the primary factor in U.S. population growth, which, if present rates continue, will swell from our present 315 million to some 445 million by mid-century.
EXPLORE
October 11, 2012
Editor: It might surprise you to know that the Bel Air, Maryland residents do not want you to build an enormous Walmart Supercenter in our residential neighborhoods, a store that will destroy our community. We realize that the "bottom line" is your concern. Our concerns are: safety of the children walking to school, residents walking to a nearby shopping center and I don't believe that they would walk to Walmart, bikers and runners no matter the...
NEWS
Erica L. Green and Erica L. Green | September 27, 2012
The Maryland State Department of Education is conducting a search for the next set of environmentally friendly schools to compete for the title of 2013 National Green Ribbon Schools, a program sponsored by the U.S. Department of Education that recognizes schools' efforts to have students become environmentally literate and conscious. The state began participating in the federal program last year, and was one of only six states to have all four nominees receive a Green Ribbon, according to the department, who also noted that in 2011 Maryland led the nation in becoming the first state to include environmental literacy as a graduation requirement.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | August 31, 2012
So racing returns to downtown streets today, as the Grand Prix of Baltimore takes over the Inner Harbor and Camden Yards through Sunday. The new organizers of the revived racing festival have managed to avoid the tempest over tree removal that dogged the runup to last year's inaugural event.  But they've also dropped any pretense of reducing or mitigating the noise, unfiltered racecar exhaust and other environmental impacts of the extravaganza....
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | February 9, 2012
Some of those environmental activists campaigning against the Keystone XL pipeline are on the young side.  Kids from 20 Maryland high schools, who dub themselves the Tar Sands Students, plan to meet today with a representative of the White House Council on Environmental Quality to press their concerns about construction of the line to carry oil extracted from tar sands deposits in western Canada to refineries in the Gulf of Mexico....
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | January 4, 2012
A top federal scientist says more research is needed into possible health and environmental effects from shale gas drilling. Dr. Christopher Portier, director of the National Center for Environmental Health, said in an email to the Associated Press that studies to date have failed to settle questions about the potential impact of shale gas drilling and the hydraulic fracturing technique being used to extract the gas. “Studies should...
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN STAFF | May 29, 2005
Mud dredged from the bottom of the Inner Harbor would be dumped at a new site along the banks of the Middle Branch of the Patapsco River in South Baltimore under a proposal by the Maryland Port Administration. The undersea muck - which officials say would be cleaned of contaminants - would get new life as the foundation for a marine terminal. And in exchange for allowing the plan to proceed, the community would see nearby land transformed into a nature center and sanctuary for eagles, ospreys and shorebirds.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | May 1, 2002
As he handed out anti-maglev train fliers at the door to Murray Hill Middle School in southern Howard County last night, Fred Ganong said he thought the train would be perfect - for the Los Angeles-Las Vegas run. The vast majority of the more than 300 people who dropped in during the 3 1/2 -hour Maryland Transit Administration briefing last night at the school seemed to share his opposition to a maglev train in the county. "It's 30 yards from our house," said Roy Tarash of Tall Window Way in Huntington, in Columbia's Kings Contrivance village.
EXPLORE
November 28, 2011
I've read several accounts of the proposed artificial turf fields for the county high schools. None has addressed the possible adverse environmental impact of the product, especially when spread across several county high school fields. It isn't necessarily something we should automatically promote. From what I've read about artificial turf, it not only poses a higher risk of injury to the kids who play on it than natural turf, it can leach carcinogens into the local ground water, and long-term, even costs more to maintain.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | November 10, 2011
The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs has released a report on the potential environmental impact of a proposed 1,473-unit residential development on the Baltimore County waterfront that can be summed up in two words: no problem. Opponents of the Fort Howard project disagree, and they mean to make waves. The 171-page report, open for public comment through Nov. 25 finds that the proposal by Fort Howard Development LLC would have "no significant impacts" on air, water, wildlife, land use or local traffic, and "no significant public controversy is anticipated.
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