Advertisement
HomeCollectionsEnvironmental Health
IN THE NEWS

Environmental Health

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Staff writer | May 21, 1991
Steven Witt just cut a hundred miles a day off his daily commute.The Harford County resident will take command of Anne Arundel's environmental health programs next month.But for the past six years he has served as the environmental health director in Southern Maryland's Charles County.At a news conference yesterday afternoon, County Health Officer Thomas Andrews saidhe expects Witt, 44, to give the Anne Arundel County Department of Health a higher environmental profile.Andrews said he eventually wants the county to enact and enforce its own anti-pollution laws, which would complement state and federal regulations.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 10, 2014
Baby sitter training course Safe Sitter teaches pre-teens how to nurture and guide young children while in their care. Sponsored by Baltimore Washington Medical Center, the program will be held from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Friday, Oct. 17, in the medical center's 3 South Classroom, 3 r d floor, 301 Hospital Drive, Glen Burnie. Cost $50. Pre-registration required at mybwmc.org. Information: 410-787-4367. Suicide prevention A Chesapeake Life Center symposium: "Life After a Suicide Loss," will be presented by author Eric Marcus of the American Foundation For Suicide Prevention from 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Oct. 21 in the center, 90 Ritchie Highway, Pasadena.
Advertisement
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 18, 1997
PITMAN, N.J. - Medical investigators poring over thousands of birth records from households near a former toxic waste dump in southwestern New Jersey have found unusually clear evidence of a link that is often hard to measure - between industrial chemicals in the environment and their impact on human health.Federal and New Jersey health officials have reported that they found a significant drop in birth weight and a doubled incidence of pre-term births in infants born to women who, in the early 1970s, lived near the Lipari landfill in Gloucester County, which went on to hold the No. 1 spot on the federal Superfund list of hazardous waste sites around the country.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2014
The director of Baltimore's Environmental Control Board was fired Friday amid an investigation by the city's inspector general into payroll issues. Attorney Sandra E. Baker, who had worked in city government for 13 years, was dismissed after Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake received "notification from the inspector general's office indicating discrepancies between hours billed to the city and actual hours worked," said Rawlings-Blake's spokesman, Kevin Harris. "The inspector general's findings were of a severe enough nature that the mayor decided immediate termination was the most appropriate response.
NEWS
June 6, 1998
An article in yesterday's editions about the Johns Hopkins University's research of cancer in Wagner's Point misstated the title of Devon Payne-Sturges. She will be the city's assistant commissioner for environmental health.The Sun regrets the error.Pub Date: 6/06/98
NEWS
By Larry Carson | August 24, 2007
Howard County health officials are warning residents that they have had several reports of unlicensed vendors selling packaged frozen food from freezers strapped into the back of pick-up trucks. The county Health Department warned that there is no guarantee the food has been kept at proper temperatures, or is safe to eat. Dr. Peter Beilenson, county health officer, advised buying only from licensed, regulated food establishments. Anyone with questions may call the Bureau of Environmental Health at 410-313-1772.
NEWS
May 31, 1995
Open burning to be restrictedBeginning tomorrow and continuing through Aug. 31, open burning will be prohibited.Exceptions will be made for bona fide agricultural operations and fire company training exercises.People with previously approved permits have been notified of the change in regulations.The prohibition is the result of regulations imposed May 22 by the Maryland Department of the Environment to help bring Maryland into compliance with the federal Clean Air Act. The regulations restrict open burning in Carroll and other counties in the Baltimore/Washington metropolitan area.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2014
The director of Baltimore's Environmental Control Board was fired Friday amid an investigation by the city's inspector general into payroll issues. Attorney Sandra E. Baker, who had worked in city government for 13 years, was dismissed after Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake received "notification from the inspector general's office indicating discrepancies between hours billed to the city and actual hours worked," said Rawlings-Blake's spokesman, Kevin Harris. "The inspector general's findings were of a severe enough nature that the mayor decided immediate termination was the most appropriate response.
NEWS
By Patrick Gilbert and Patrick Gilbert,Evening Sun Staff | November 7, 1991
It will cost city residents more to rescue their dogs and cats from the city pound as a result of fee increases approved by the Board of Estimates.The additional money generated by the fee increases will help the city retain about 25 employees in the city Department of Health's division of environmental health. These include animal control officers and inspectors who monitor air pollution, public pools and occupational health.These jobs were imperiled when Gov. William Donald Schaefer last month announced cuts in state aid to local jurisdictions in an effort to close a $450 million state budget shortfall.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Staff Writer | October 28, 1992
Efforts by the county commissioners to restore funding to state-trimmed health programs may boil down to choosing vaccines for schoolchildren over hamburger inspections.The commissioners yesterday were given a priority list for restoring dollars to health care and environmental health programs if funding becomes available. The priorities were made by health director Dr. Janet W. Neslen and her staff.Steven D. Powell, the county budget director, asked the commissioners not to look at dollars but to look at the necessity of services such as school health programs, which provide hearing and vision screening for more than 10,000 students in kindergarten and the third, sixth and eighth grades.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 22, 2014
Stuart F. Oster, an environmental health specialist who worked for the Howard County Health Department, died June 28 of undetermined causes at his Ellicott City home. He was 55. "We are waiting for the results of the toxicologist's report from the medical examiner as to the cause of death," said a brother, Kevin R. Oster of Monkton. The son of Edwin F. Oster Jr., an engineer, and LaRue K. Oster, a homemaker, Stuart Frederick Oster was born in Baltimore and raised in Lutherville.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 12, 2013
Howard E. Chaney, a retired Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene official whose career spanned more than three decades, died Sunday of cancer at his Lutherville home. He was 95. Howard Edward Chaney was born and raised in Baltimore and graduated from the Polytechnic Institute in 1935. He then took a job as a laboratory assistant with the state Department of Health - now the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene - in the Division of Chemistry, where his job was washing glassware and test tubes.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | January 18, 2013
A new federal report finds toxic contamination remains widespread in the Chesapeake Bay, with severe impacts in some places, which health and environmental advocates say lends support to their push in Annapolis for legislative action on pesticides and other hazardous chemicals. The 184-page report, recently posted on the website of the Environmental Protection Agency's Chesapeake Bay program , notes that nearly three-fourths of the bay's tidal waters are "fully or partially impaired" by toxic chemicals, with contamination severe enough in some areas that people are warned to limit how many fish they eat from there.  The chemicals tainting fish are mainly mercury and polychlorinated biphenyls, or PCBs.  Once widely used in electrical equipment, PCBs were banned years ago over health concerns, but residues linger and continue to show up in fish tissue.  "They may be coming down - I can't say they're not - but we know they're not coming down quickly," said Greg Allen, an EPA scientist and the lead author of the interagency report, which was produced in cooperation with the U.S. Geological Survey and the Fish and Wildlife Service . Contamination is severe in a handful of "hot spots" around the bay, including Baltimore's harbor, largely a legacy of past industrial and shipping activity.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | January 1, 2013
The first winter after Danielle Smith bought her house in North Baltimore, the 35-year-old schoolteacher wondered if it even had a furnace, it was so cold and drafty. Now, with almost all new windows and several other energy-efficiency retrofits, Smith said, her four-bedroom single-story home in the mid-Govans neighborhood is cozier, less costly to heat — and apparently healthier for her 8-year-old son, Akil. "You can feel the difference," she said, as her son played on the carpeted living room floor at her feet.
EXPLORE
November 28, 2011
I've read several accounts of the proposed artificial turf fields for the county high schools. None has addressed the possible adverse environmental impact of the product, especially when spread across several county high school fields. It isn't necessarily something we should automatically promote. From what I've read about artificial turf, it not only poses a higher risk of injury to the kids who play on it than natural turf, it can leach carcinogens into the local ground water, and long-term, even costs more to maintain.
NEWS
July 28, 1991
The first four-year study program at a Maryland university leading to a bachelor's degree in environmental health will be launched in September at Salisbury State University in the Richard A. Henson School of Science and Technology.The new program, which received authorization recently from Maryland's Higher Education Commission, is designed to prepare students for a variety of careers in the expanding environmental health field.Job opportunities in the field are opening up in federal, state and local governments, and in the private sector, said Dr. John Molenda, SSU biology professor and coordinator of the program.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | December 2, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Three staples of modern life -- secondhand cigarette smoke, alcohol and diesel exhaust -- will likely soon be added to the official federal government list of cancer-causing agents, an action with potentially large regulatory and legal effects.An influential independent panel of scientists probably will recommend that course after what are expected to be contentious hearings on the three substances today and tomorrow at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences in North Carolina's Research Triangle Park.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.