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Environmental Hazards

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NEWS
May 7, 2013
For years, the ill effects of improperly dumped hazardous wastes was a hot topic in the media. However, it seems as though only big name corporations that get caught disposing colossal amounts of waste get covered today. Candy Thomson's recent report shows that there are still concerns when it comes to toxic dumping locally ("Baltimore man sentenced in hazardous waste case," April 29). The fact that the article reports on an average person and not a large corporation deserves applause.
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FEATURES
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2013
A meeting to address residents' concerns over environmental hazards on the site of the proposed Harbor Point development has been delayed because of the federal government shutdown. The meeting had been scheduled for Monday at neighbors' demands, but Environmental Protection Agency officials will not be able to attend because they have been furloughed, said City Councilman James Kraft, who organized the meeting. The controversial Harbor Point development, slated to house energy company Exelon Corp.
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BUSINESS
By Dian Hymer | January 30, 1994
What environmental hazards should I be concerned about?There are horror stories about homeowners who have discovered after they have owned their homes for a while that their housing development was built on highly toxic landfill. Less notorious, but worrisome to many home buyers, are environmental hazards that might affect only a single household.Recent attention has focused on lead (present in house paint before 1978 and lead solder used in plumbing older homes), asbestos (an insulating and stiffening material used in older homes)
NEWS
May 7, 2013
For years, the ill effects of improperly dumped hazardous wastes was a hot topic in the media. However, it seems as though only big name corporations that get caught disposing colossal amounts of waste get covered today. Candy Thomson's recent report shows that there are still concerns when it comes to toxic dumping locally ("Baltimore man sentenced in hazardous waste case," April 29). The fact that the article reports on an average person and not a large corporation deserves applause.
BUSINESS
By JANE BRYANT QUINN and JANE BRYANT QUINN,1991, Washington Post Writers Group | May 26, 1991
New York--When you bought your last house, you might have had it checked for termites and dry rot.When you buy your next one, you should check it for a wide range of environmental hazards as well.Almost any piece of property might, in the past, have had toxic substances buried there. Almost any vacant lot might be hit, in the night, by guys in dark shirts who are making an illegal dump. Almost any homeowner might turn on the tap and find the water stinking of chemicals from a nearby spill.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | October 15, 1998
Tests of soil surrounding Locust House, a subsidized housing complex for the elderly and disabled in Westminster, have concluded the building is free of any obvious environmental hazards.The Carroll County Board of Housing Review had recommended soil testing to determine the source of an intermittent foul odor at the seven-story complex, home to nearly 100 tenants.Science Applications International Corp., based in Middletown, Pa., bored 6 feet into the soil last month at eight sites around the building near Westminster City Hall.
NEWS
July 25, 2000
IT'S TIME to get moving on the disposal of 100 decrepit retired military ships polluting American rivers. Finally, it appears Congress is gearing up. A conference committee approved $38 million to continue a pilot program of dismantling these ships in American dry docks. That is where work can be done to take apart these rotting hulks without creating environmental hazards or endangering workers. The ships are loaded with asbestos, PCBs, lead paint and other toxins. Scrapping them without high standards is unacceptable.
NEWS
By Bruce Reid and Bruce Reid,Sun Staff Writer | April 17, 1995
When Helen and Robert Burdess bought a four-bedroom house in Edgewood last fall, a painful lesson came with it.The couple learned last month that their new, $147,000 house, with its garage, family room and wooded lot, is a quarter-mile from one of the most dangerous chemical weapons burial sites in the country, at Aberdeen Proving Ground.The lesson: Buyer beware.Maryland and its localities have a hodgepodge of laws and policies to encourage builders and real estate agents to disclose important information to prospective homebuyers.
BUSINESS
By Jim Johnson and Jim Johnson,McClatchy News Service | March 22, 1992
Homebuyers concerned about environmental hazards can get some guidance from a booklet published by California Realtors."Environmental Hazards: A Guide for Homeowners and Buyers," published in a question-and-answer format, offers some insight into the primary hazards -- asbestos, formaldehyde, lead, radon and toxic wastes.The 47-page booklet is far from comprehensive. Much of its space is devoted to lists of phone numbers, agencies and titles of other printed materials on the subject.But Michael Lyon, president of the Sacramento Association of Realtors, says the booklet "educates buyers about a field where more knowledge is needed."
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,stephanie.desmon@baltsun.com | October 25, 2008
Maryland has made great strides in reducing lead paint poisoning among children and in improving the outdoor air they breathe, but more needs to be done to keep track of other environmental hazards and their links to kids' health, according to a report released yesterday by state health and environment officials. While pointing to previously reported decreases in the number of children with lead poisoning and an equally significant drop in ozone levels in Maryland, officials said they plan to better keep track of issues such as pesticide levels in children, their exposure to pharmaceuticals in water and where serious asthma cases are most concentrated.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie | liz.bowie@baltsun.com | March 8, 2010
Adel Hizi said he never realized how important water was. Then a major water main break cut off the supply to 100,000 customers in Baltimore County for the weekend - while Hizi and his wife were trying to care for their 9-month-old baby. As the water stoppage dragged on, and as Baltimore's Department of Public Works was unable to say when the water would be turned on, the Owings Mills resident was considering taking his family to a hotel. The dirty dishes and dirty clothes were piling up, everyone needed a bath and he was using large containers of drinking water to empty the toilet.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,stephanie.desmon@baltsun.com | October 25, 2008
Maryland has made great strides in reducing lead paint poisoning among children and in improving the outdoor air they breathe, but more needs to be done to keep track of other environmental hazards and their links to kids' health, according to a report released yesterday by state health and environment officials. While pointing to previously reported decreases in the number of children with lead poisoning and an equally significant drop in ozone levels in Maryland, officials said they plan to better keep track of issues such as pesticide levels in children, their exposure to pharmaceuticals in water and where serious asthma cases are most concentrated.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,sun reporter | January 5, 2007
In its final report to Maryland legislators, a group studying a proposed liquefied natural gas facility on Sparrows Point is recommending that state officials urge federal regulators to deny approval for the project based on environmental and safety concerns. The panel also recommends that the state not issue any permits that would allow the project to move forward, according to the report, which was finalized yesterday. But it remains unclear whether state officials have the authority to stop the widely criticized project.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | April 8, 2005
People complaining about potential environmental hazards from a wastewater treatment system needed for an expansion of Glenelg High School should be ignored, says County Councilman Charles C. Feaga, a western county Republican. "Those people were anti-growth in the extreme, and some are only recently here," Feaga told a meeting of County Council and school board members Wednesday. He was describing testimony at a state environmental hearing he attended Monday night at the school. The state must issue a permit for the treatment system before the addition can be built.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | April 14, 2004
Disposing of old computers, printers, cell phones and other electronics would be less of an environmental hazard if Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. signs into law a measure approved by the General Assembly. The legislation requires the state Department of the Environment to set up a collection system by January 2006. But first, the department must form a study group to make recommendations to the governor and General Assembly by the end of the year. Technology, environmental and solid waste officials will serve on the group, said Del. Dan K. Morhaim, the physician and Baltimore County Democrat who sponsored the measure.
TOPIC
By Beverly A. Kaiser | July 29, 2001
MANY OF TODAY'S Southern inner cities are war zones where young men and women get cut down before their lives barely begin. Growing up in Western Heights, a Knoxville, Tenn., public housing project where abrupt violence was commonplace, I quickly learned to avoid certain street corners and the so-called "bad people." I eventually developed my own survival map, which I hoped would guide me to adulthood. My map, however, couldn't help me navigate all inner-city dangers. Severe hazards seeped through bolted doors, barred windows, and corroding pipes.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Staff Writer | April 22, 1992
Seizing on the 23rd observance of Earth Day, federal, state and local officials have announced a series of steps aimed at cleaning up Baltimore, including a new study of the health and environmental risks faced by urban residents.But the announcement yesterday struck a sour note with some environmentalists, who accused officials of dodging their responsibilities to crack down on pollution.The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency said it has chosen Baltimore and Washington, D.C., to launch a new program aimed at identifying and reducing the public health and environmental hazards to which city dwellers may be exposed.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | April 14, 1999
Maryland homebuyers will gain some warning of environmental hazards like the methane gas that forced evacuation of several new homes in Elkridge last year and sparked a $75 million lawsuit, say advocates of a bill enacted by the General Assembly April 7. The legislation survived opposition from builders, who helped kill several other consumer-oriented measures this year -- such as builder registration -- and who say the new law will require useless...
NEWS
By Heather Dewar and Heather Dewar,SUN STAFF | March 4, 2001
The city's three main waterways are heavily contaminated with sewage bacteria at levels routinely more than 10 times what is considered safe for public health, and sometimes 100 times the safe level. Environmental experts agree that chronic leaks and undetected breaks in the city's aging, deteriorated sewer lines are probably responsible for most of the contamination in Herring Run, Gwynns Falls and Jones Falls. A top Environmental Protection Agency official said the situation apparently violates the federal Clean Water Act, the nation's premier water pollution law, which leaves polluters vulnerable to fines of up to $27,500 each day the pollution persists.
NEWS
July 25, 2000
IT'S TIME to get moving on the disposal of 100 decrepit retired military ships polluting American rivers. Finally, it appears Congress is gearing up. A conference committee approved $38 million to continue a pilot program of dismantling these ships in American dry docks. That is where work can be done to take apart these rotting hulks without creating environmental hazards or endangering workers. The ships are loaded with asbestos, PCBs, lead paint and other toxins. Scrapping them without high standards is unacceptable.
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