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BUSINESS
February 25, 1991
New positionsMcCrone Inc., an Annapolis-based engineering, environmental consulting, land planning and surveying firm, named the following engineers: Virginia L. Dadds and Jonathan A. Blasco, development engineering department; Chee W. Ong, environmental engineering department; and Terry L. Schuman, commercial-industrial sector, development engineering department. Frank, Bernstein, Conaway & Goldman, a Baltimore-based law firm, named Shale D. Stiller head of the workout and restructuring group.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 27, 2014
Richard P. Healy, an environmental engineer whose career with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency spanned more than three decades, died Saturday of esophageal cancer at the University of Maryland St. Joseph Medical Center. The longtime Hamilton resident was 61. "Rich was a wonderful guy and a team leader for our beach team. He has been in that position since 2002, which oversees grants to coastal Great Lakes states, which helps them with beach monitoring and advising about contamination such as sewage," said John B. Wathen, who is the assistant chief of the EPA's Fish, Shellfish, Beaches and Outreach Branch.
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NEWS
December 16, 1990
Services for David S. Hyman, civil engineer, architect, city planner and anthropologist, will be held at 2 p.m. today at Sol Levinson & Brothers Inc., 6010 Reisterstown Road.Dr. Hyman, who lived on Taney Road in Cheswolde, died Friday at Union Memorial Hospital after a long illness. He was 68.A lifelong resident of Baltimore, he attended City College and earned a bachelor's degree in civil engineering from the University of Maryland in 1949. During World War II, he served with the Army in Europe and the Philippines.
NEWS
December 8, 2013
The recent commentary, "Harbor Point environmental questions," (Dec. 2), may lead The Sun's readers to believe that additional studies are necessary before work can begin on the proposed redevelopment there. In fact, these suggested studies have nothing to with the proposed redevelopment, which the authors recognize will be safe. "We are not saying that development of this site will result in meaningful human health and/or ecological risks," the authors state. It also is important to note that the federal consent decree for the cleanup of the former Baltimore Works site mandates that construction not jeopardize the integrity of the remedy and that detailed plans be approved by federal and state agencies.
NEWS
By DeWitt Bliss and DeWitt Bliss,Sun Staff Writer | February 20, 1994
Lucien M. Brush Jr., a Johns Hopkins University professor with an international reputation for his study of rivers and the way they carry sediment, pollutants and other materials, died Feb. 13 of cancer at his home in Roland Park. He was 64.He was a professor in both the civil engineering and the geography and environmental engineering departments at Hopkins. He had joined the faculty in 1969.M. Gordon "Reds" Wolman, engineering professor and former chairman of the geology and environmental engineering department, described Dr. Brush as a "delightful colleague, with a first-rate scientific understanding, a good teacher and a superb person to work with."
BUSINESS
June 21, 1993
New positions* ABC Box Company announced that Alan J. Fink has joined its staff.* The Colonnade appointed Teri A. Agosta director of sales.* Comsat Technology Services appointed Michael Jimenez-Wolfe marketing director, Latin America, and Laura L. Scogna marketing manager, Asia.* Country Curtains Inc. appointed Diane Jasontek manager of its Annapolis store.* 84 Lumber Company appointed John Hines co-manager of its Dundalk store.* Europro Imports Inc. named Jamie Drumlin manager of its products division.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,Sun Staff Writer | May 7, 1995
Dr. John Charles Geyer, an internationally recognized authority for pioneering studies on the origin and treatment of wastewater, radioactive wastes and storm drainage, died Tuesday after a lengthy illness at the Keswick Home. He was 88.Dr. Geyer was professor of environmental engineering at the Johns Hopkins University from 1937 to 1970, and was chairman of the department of sanitary engineering (now the department of geography and environmental engineering) from 1957 to 1970. He continued as principal research scientist until his retirement in 1976.
BUSINESS
By Kim Clark | March 25, 1991
Though the recession has cut into demand for everything from cars to candlesticks, the need to clean up pollution keeps on growing.And Thomas R. Hundt, the new head of mid-Atlantic operations for EA Engineering, Science, and Technology Inc., says environmental cleanup firms like his expect to keep expanding.Dr. Hundt, who received a doctorate in environmental engineering from the Johns Hopkins University in 1985, said he is only one of the new hires he expects the Hunt Valley-based environmental cleanup firm to make in the next several months.
BUSINESS
May 6, 2003
Legal Askinazi joins firm of Shulman, Rogers Shulman, Rogers, Gandal, Pordy & Ecker announced the admission of William F. Askinazi, a former Maryland assistant secretary of business and economic development, as of counsel. He will focus on torts, insurance and risk management issues for the Rockville-based firm. A law graduate of Georgetown University, he earned a master's of business administration degree from the University of Connecticut at Stamford. A member of the Maryland and District of Columbia bar associations, he is an arbitrator-mediator with the American Arbitration Association.
NEWS
October 26, 1991
Engineering professorVincent P. OlivieriA Mass of Christian burial for Vincent P. Olivieri, a water quality consultant who was an engineering professor at the Johns Hopkins University and a technical director for a filter company, will be offered at 10 a.m. today at the Roman Catholic Church of St. Mary of the Assumption, 5502 York Road, Govans.Dr. Olivieri, who was 48 and lived on Sycamore Road, died Wednesday after a heart attack in Atlanta, where he was attending an American Filtration Society meeting.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | February 16, 2011
Jerome Gavis, a retired Johns Hopkins University professor of chemical engineering who conducted early basic research on the Chesapeake Bay's environmental health, died of a stroke Feb. 8 at Union Memorial Hospital. He was 82 and lived in the Village of Cross Keys. Born in Hartford, Conn., he was the son of a clothing salesman and a homemaker. He moved with his family to Brooklyn, N.Y., and was a 1945 Stuyvesant High School graduate. He earned a bachelor's degree in chemical engineering from Brooklyn Polytechnic Institute and a doctorate in chemistry from Cornell University.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | December 22, 2010
Charles R. O'Melia, one of the world's leading water-treatment researchers who during his nearly-three-decade tenure at the Johns Hopkins University mentored more than 100 graduate environmental engineering students, died Dec. 16 of a brain tumor at his Timonium home. He was 76. "A true scholar and a gentleman, Charlie embodied the best of Johns Hopkins. His generosity and warmth of spirit were matched by a terrific dedication to his work as a researcher, educator and scholar," Nicholas P. Jones, dean of Hopkins' Whiting School of Engineering, and Edward J. Bouwer, chairman of the department of geography and environmental engineering, said in a joint statement.
NEWS
January 10, 2007
James A. Avirett Jr., an environmental engineer whose specialty was water and wastewater management, died of cancer Thursday at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. The Cockeysville resident was 57. Mr. Avirett was born and raised in Cumberland and was a 1967 graduate of Mercersburg Academy in Pennsylvania. He earned a bachelor's degree in civil engineering in 1971 from Lafayette College in Easton, Pa., and a master's degree in environmental engineering from the Johns Hopkins University in 1973.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | September 8, 2005
The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is hiring environmental engineering firms to begin mopping up the muddy gumbo of bacteria, sewage, lead and oil left by the floodwaters bathing New Orleans. "This whole cleanup will be a monumental task," said Robert Martinson, an environmental section chief for the Army Corps in New Orleans. "We don't even know yet how big of a problem we are going to have." Some of the dangerous bacteria - including Vibrio vulnificus, which killed three people along the Gulf Coast and sickened many more with gastrointestinal ailments - are expected to be killed by sunlight as the water is pumped out of the city and the muck dries, flood experts said.
NEWS
August 25, 2005
Joseph H. Bourdon III, a retired environmental engineer whose specialty was water and wastewater treatment, died of complications from Alzheimer's disease Aug. 18 at the Quail Run assisted-living facility in Perry Hall. The Timonium resident was 74. Mr. Bourdon was born in Baltimore and raised in Overlea. He was a 1948 graduate of Polytechnic Institute and earned a degree in civil engineering from the University of Maryland, College Park in 1952. After serving in the Air Force from 1952 to 1954, he began his engineering career at Whitman Requardt Associates in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | September 17, 2003
A Democratic Baltimore County councilman said yesterday that he was fired from a low-level state job in a political move orchestrated by Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. Vincent J. Gardina said that despite positive work reviews, he was told yesterday morning that he had been dismissed from his $56,000-a-year job as an engineer working on dredging projects for Maryland Environmental Service, a self-supporting state agency that provides water supply, waste purification...
BUSINESS
April 24, 1991
Financial servicesChase Bank of Maryland has appointed Patrick J. Ventura to its board of directors. Ventura has served as controller of the bank since 1988 and was named financial executive in 1989.Chase has named Noel Chesser and Keith A. Perry vice presidents of finance.Legg Mason Wood Walker has named Jay R. Leopold associate vice president in the Research Department.Image Dynamics Inc. has promoted Tracey L. Weinberg to senior account supervisor and director of meetings and special events.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | September 8, 2005
The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is hiring environmental engineering firms to begin mopping up the muddy gumbo of bacteria, sewage, lead and oil left by the floodwaters bathing New Orleans. "This whole cleanup will be a monumental task," said Robert Martinson, an environmental section chief for the Army Corps in New Orleans. "We don't even know yet how big of a problem we are going to have." Some of the dangerous bacteria - including Vibrio vulnificus, which killed three people along the Gulf Coast and sickened many more with gastrointestinal ailments - are expected to be killed by sunlight as the water is pumped out of the city and the muck dries, flood experts said.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | July 27, 2003
For the past decade, environmental engineer Jim Gebhardt and his boss, Paul Robert, have been Fort Meade's go-to guys in the sticky matter of cleaning up one of the nation's most contaminated military sites. To the Army brass, they were the civilians who could translate into plain English the migration of chlorinated solvents. To the civilians outside the base, they were the Army representatives who always told the often-ugly truth. To the regulators monitoring the cleanup, they were the shortest cut through red tape.
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