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NEWS
By Jodi Bizar and Jodi Bizar,Contributing writer | May 5, 1991
Dave Ziolkowski, a 17-year-old Joppatowne High School student, has seen pictures of osprey in class. But last Friday he glimpsed one flying above him as he cruised down the Gunpowder River."
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NEWS
September 20, 2001
The Baltimore-based Lions Vision Research Foundation will hold its second annual "Swing for Sight" golf tournament Oct. 1 at the Chartwell Gold and Country Club on Chartwell Drive in Severna Park. Registration will take place at 9:30 a.m., and there will be a shotgun start at 11 a.m. The event will feature prizes including a "hole in one" award, "closest to pin," and "longest drive," and a catered lunch. There will be an open bar from 4:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. and a buffet dinner at 5 p.m. An awards ceremony will close the event.
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | December 15, 2000
IT'S 9:30 P.M. WHEN he ends a long day of meetings. A foggy, winter drizzle envelops Annapolis as Don Baugh ducks into an alley behind the Chesapeake Bay Foundation headquarters, shucking coat and tie, tugging on neoprene boots, mitts and full dry suit for the commute home. I'd offer a ride, but Baugh, vice president for education at the 90,000-member foundation, practices what he preaches, including less driving, which translates to less bay pollution. So he paddles, six miles to work and back, in dark and rain, in ice, in 30 knot winds, down the Severn, around the Naval Academy, into City Dock, where his red kayak jostles for space with the dinghies of pleasure craft.
NEWS
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,SUN STAFF | July 25, 1998
In one of its first steps to improve life in Baltimore, the local arm of billionaire George Soros' philanthropy has awarded almost $500,000 in fellowships to 10 area residents.The Open Society Institute-Baltimore has awarded "community fellowships" -- each worth $48,750 -- for the recipients to improve inner-city life in ways such as raising voices in song, raising vegetables or raising the consciousness of juvenile offenders.The 18-month fellowships, announced yesterday, are a key part of Soros' plan to spend $25 million in five years to help the poor in Baltimore.
NEWS
By CASSANDRA A. FORTIN and CASSANDRA A. FORTIN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 18, 2006
Pupils at Youth's Benefit Elementary School perused the school grounds before settling on a barren area by the Fallston school's front entrance to plant a garden. After the space was tilled, they planted native plants, such as bee balm, hydrangeas and black-eyed Susans. Next, they spread mulch. They also set up two barrels to collect rainwater that drains from the roof of the school. Just a few days after planting the garden, they saw results. "I think the children have some sort of magic powers," said Karen DeHart, a teacher in the gifted-and-talented program at Youth's Benefit.
NEWS
September 22, 2010
State schools Superintendent Nancy S. Grasmick's plan to add environmental education to the curriculum of public elementary, middle and high schools is a welcome move toward making all students more aware of our responsibility to care for the planet and the impact our choices have on it. Many important public policy debates — from climate change and conservation to man-made disasters such as BP's massive oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico —...
NEWS
April 22, 1998
EARTH DAY is a good time to take stock of our environmental progress since the first observance 28 years ago. We say "progress" because the statistics and the anti-pollution programs point to a significant improvement. But the increases in population and in demand for natural resources continue to limit success of cleanup and conservation efforts.The Chesapeake Bay is the first place that Marylanders look for signs of hope and rebirth. A decade after the launch of the Chesapeake Bay Program to clean up the degraded estuary, levels of phosphorus and nitrogen, which feed eruptions of harmful algae blooms, are down 25 percent and 8 percent, respectively.
BUSINESS
By Nancy Jones-Bonbrest and Nancy Jones-Bonbrest,Special to the Sun | September 6, 2006
Ruth Wilsey Eisenhour Teacher Harford County public schools, Bel Air Salary --$70,000 a year Age: --41 Years on the job --19 How she got started --Eisenhour spent the first six years as a fifth-grade teacher for Harford County public schools. The past 13 years she has worked as an environmental educator with the system's Harford Glen Environmental Education Center. Typical day --Eisenhour works a regular school schedule starting in late August and ending in June. She begins her day at 7:30 a.m. and ends at 3:30 p.m. However, the center also has an overnight camp for fifth-graders 16 weeks out of the school year.
NEWS
By Mary Ellen Graybill and Mary Ellen Graybill,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 14, 2003
Today, Eden Mill shines as a nature center and Harford County landmark nestled along Deer Creek in Pylesville, rescued from neglect mostly by the determined efforts of a band of volunteers. The mill and its 57 acres of grounds were purchased by the county Department of Parks and Recreation in 1964, and since then, volunteers have adopted the site as a restoration project. Leaders in the effort are Donald "Spike" Webb, 87, Frank J. Marsden, 56, and Roland Beckman, 49. In 1966, Webb and his wife, Blanche, bought the nearby Stansbury mansion, where the miller once lived.
NEWS
By PHILLIP MCGOWAN AND ANICA BUTLER and PHILLIP MCGOWAN AND ANICA BUTLER,SUN REPORTERS | February 1, 2006
Anne Arundel County would receive a significant boost in state aid for open-space preservation and school renovations under a $1.5 billion state capital budget unveiled by Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. this week. The capital budget contains about $47 million in spending on county environmental and education projects. Ehrlich, a Republican, designated more than one-third of his fiscal year 2007 capital budget - $615 million - for funding environmental projects throughout the state. In the process, Anne Arundel County reaped $16.1 million for open-space grants; $11.8 million to upgrade facilities at the county's largest sewer plant, at Cox Creek on the Patapsco River; and $4.1 million for waterway improvement projects along the Chesapeake Bay. On the education front, nearly $15.2 million has been set aside for a dozen schools, including $4 million toward building Seven Oaks Elementary and $2.4 million to construct science labs at Meade High.
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