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NEWS
Erica L. Green and Erica L. Green | September 27, 2012
The Maryland State Department of Education is conducting a search for the next set of environmentally friendly schools to compete for the title of 2013 National Green Ribbon Schools, a program sponsored by the U.S. Department of Education that recognizes schools' efforts to have students become environmentally literate and conscious. The state began participating in the federal program last year, and was one of only six states to have all four nominees receive a Green Ribbon, according to the department, who also noted that in 2011 Maryland led the nation in becoming the first state to include environmental literacy as a graduation requirement.
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NEWS
By SANDY ALEXANDER and SANDY ALEXANDER,SUN REPORTER | July 21, 2006
In her new role as executive director of the Howard County Conservancy, Meg Schumacher has to oversee the organization's dual roles as a preservation-focused land trust and an environmental education organization. She also has to feed the chickens. There are also goats on Mount Pleasant Farm in Woodstock, which is the conservancy's headquarters, as well as coyotes, wild turkeys, bugs, birds, gardens, woodlands and two streams. The Gudelsky Environmental Education Center was built on the property a year ago. Schumacher, who took over the director position last month, said her first goal is to get more people to appreciate and enjoy all the aspects of the organization.
NEWS
May 22, 2005
The Western Horizon Council and the Glenwood library will offer a free dinner and workshop for middle school pupils and their parents, "Hidden IMs, Chat Choices, and Save Surfing," from 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Tuesday at the library, 2350 Route 97, Cooksville. Dinner will be served at 6:30 p.m.; the program is to begin at 7 p.m. Maryland State Police investigator Elliot Cohen will be the facilitator. The Western Horizon Council, a group of people who live or work in western Howard County, advises the Horizon Foundation on community concerns and makes recommendations to address the issues.
NEWS
By Jonathan H. Adler | July 7, 1992
SOME call it "eco-kid power," while to others it is the "newest parental nightmare." The latest craze sweeping the nation's youth is environmental consciousness, due in no small part to the spread of ecological issues into the classroom. This movement has penetrated nearly every school district in the country, as teachers instruct children on the importance of being earnestly green.While it is entirely appropriate to learn about the environment in the classroom, much of what is taught to children is simple-minded and inaccurate.
NEWS
By KAREN NITKIN and KAREN NITKIN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 30, 2005
On a cloudy, starting-to-feel-like-fall day this week, about a dozen sixth-graders from Chesapeake Bay Middle School waded thigh-deep into the Indian Creek branch of the Severn River. Though they were wearing rubber boots, their clothes were soaked at least to their waists. And they didn't seem to mind. "I think something just swam over my foot," said Carly Bair, 11, smiling. Nearby, several students were pulling a large seine along the water, capturing tiny bay anchovies and even a crab, and placing their treasures in a plastic container filled with water.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | June 11, 1998
Seeking to create a campus that is more in harmony with nature -- and students who will be better stewards of it -- Bryn Mawr School is launching a campaign to increase public awareness of the fragile state of the environment and the need to protect it. "Stewardship 2000" is the name of the school's environmental initiative. Its goal is to produce a "sustainability plan" that touches all areas of the campus, from the teaching curriculum to the buildings in which classes are taught.
BUSINESS
By LESTER A. PICKER | April 22, 1991
For the 26th anniversary of Earth Day, I thought I'd do something bold and daring. I'm publicly announcing my Environmental Theorem No. 1. For those not into stuffy science or fuzzy-warm ecology, I'll state it simply: Unless acted upon by considerable outside force (i.e., a smack upside the head), most people actually believe the Earth is flat.There, I said it. In public, in print.You see, most of us have never been on a space shuttle. So, while we may know intellectually that the Earth is round, our daily lives tend to reinforce the notion that it is actually flatter than the proverbial pancake.
NEWS
By From Staff Reports | July 1, 1992
Suit alleges Huddles didn't pay rent, feesTOWSON -- Former County Councilman Gary Huddles has been sued by a Towson law firm that alleges he owes the firm $6,833 in unpaid rent and office fees.Mr. Huddles, who subleased space from the firm of Hoden & Pessin at 22 W. Allegheny Ave., answered the District Court suit by asking that the case be tried before a jury in Circuit Court. The suit, which was filed during the spring, was transferred to the Circuit Court on Monday. No trial date has been set.According to court records, Hoden & Pessin subleased part of their office space to Mr. Huddles for $2,000 a month, plus postage and telephone costs.
NEWS
By Susan Gvozdas and Susan Gvozdas,Special to The Sun | September 9, 2007
Big Barry and Little Steve have suddenly made Anne Arundel County's school headquarters in Annapolis a lot more fun. Visitors to the administrative building gravitate to the aquarium to watch the two small terrapins glide through the water and chow down on clams. Children start one-sided conversations with the terrapins. The turtles have gotten so used to the human attention since arriving in August that they swim toward the tapping fingers on the glass.
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | December 15, 2000
IT'S 9:30 P.M. WHEN he ends a long day of meetings. A foggy, winter drizzle envelops Annapolis as Don Baugh ducks into an alley behind the Chesapeake Bay Foundation headquarters, shucking coat and tie, tugging on neoprene boots, mitts and full dry suit for the commute home. I'd offer a ride, but Baugh, vice president for education at the 90,000-member foundation, practices what he preaches, including less driving, which translates to less bay pollution. So he paddles, six miles to work and back, in dark and rain, in ice, in 30 knot winds, down the Severn, around the Naval Academy, into City Dock, where his red kayak jostles for space with the dinghies of pleasure craft.
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