Advertisement
HomeCollectionsEnvironmental Education
IN THE NEWS

Environmental Education

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Kathi J. Heron | February 10, 2011
Traditionally, Maryland has been at the head of the class in understanding the value of environmental education. Other states have looked to us for leadership. For example, many states are following the model established in Maryland of partnering state education and natural resources agencies to address environmental literacy. That's why a proposed state regulation last month shocked and disappointed so many teachers, principals and others around Maryland who witness firsthand the benefits of environmental education to students: the enthusiasm generated, the higher test scores, the jobs secured.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
Erica L. Green and Erica L. Green | September 27, 2012
The Maryland State Department of Education is conducting a search for the next set of environmentally friendly schools to compete for the title of 2013 National Green Ribbon Schools, a program sponsored by the U.S. Department of Education that recognizes schools' efforts to have students become environmentally literate and conscious. The state began participating in the federal program last year, and was one of only six states to have all four nominees receive a Green Ribbon, according to the department, who also noted that in 2011 Maryland led the nation in becoming the first state to include environmental literacy as a graduation requirement.
Advertisement
NEWS
February 12, 2011
I read with interest the commentary by Kathi J. Heron entitled "Don't backpedal on environmental ed" (Feb. 11). She is right that environmental education should be a critical component of education in Maryland, particularly from the perspective of developing and nurturing environmental stewardship in our children. However, there is another side to this coin, and that is the relationship between the environment and human health. In teaching environmental education this connection is often missed: What humankind does to the environmental comes back to bite us with regard to our health.
NEWS
October 24, 2011
As Congress continues its rewrite of the No Child Left Behind law, there is one proposed change that should draw overwhelming approval. That's the mandate - added to the bill last week by a Senate committee - to require U.S. public schools to teach environmental literacy. The need for environmental education has never been greater. Every day, the country seems to be facing new and difficult choices touching on environmental issues, ranging from how to meet energy needs to how to deal with toxic materials that might pollute our air, water or soil.
NEWS
October 7, 2010
Two years ago, at the age of 17, I had no real plans for the summer. That's when I joined the Civic Justice Corps (CJC) and it changed my life. Started by Gov. Martin O'Malley in 2008, the corps gives students from Baltimore City paid summer jobs at state parks across Maryland. But it was more than just a job. Through the CJC I learned about the environment and life skills that could help me find a job in the future. I enjoyed the program so much I returned as a counselor this year through the Maryland Conservation Corps (MCC)
NEWS
October 24, 2011
As Congress continues its rewrite of the No Child Left Behind law, there is one proposed change that should draw overwhelming approval. That's the mandate - added to the bill last week by a Senate committee - to require U.S. public schools to teach environmental literacy. The need for environmental education has never been greater. Every day, the country seems to be facing new and difficult choices touching on environmental issues, ranging from how to meet energy needs to how to deal with toxic materials that might pollute our air, water or soil.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | January 13, 2011
The Chesapeake Bay Foundation is concerned that state education officials have created a "major loophole" in the proposed regulations that would make environmental education part of every high-schooler's studies. In September, the Maryland State Board of Education voted unanimously to make environmental literacy part of the curriculum. However, it is not clear whether the vote made it a graduation requirement. The new regulation, which the board is receiving public comment on until Feb. 3, says that students must take a social studies course, a science course or an AP Environmental Science course in order to graduate.
NEWS
By Jal Mehta and Jal Mehta,SUN STAFF | July 7, 1996
A local environmental committee is asking the community to help select a person or group that has made the county a better place to live to receive the second annual Jan Hollmann Award.The award is intended for someone who "has made a significant contribution to environmental education," said L. Eugene Cronin, a member of the committee and former chairman of the Severn River Commission.Hollmann was one of Anne Arundel County's foremost environmental activists before her death from cancer in 1990.
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | November 12, 2004
Today the Conservation Fund, a national group that has protected 200,000 acres in the Chesapeake region, will announce the purchase of Garrett Island near the mouth of the Susquehanna River. Threatened in the 1990s by development, the mile-long, forested island has been held for the past few years by the Cecil Land Trust and private investors while the search continued for a way to put it in public ownership. The $750,000 deal brokered by the Conservation Fund will turn over the island next year to Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge.
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 26, 2005
Back Creek Nature Park, once the site of a Depression-era wastewater treatment center, is being transformed into an "urban ecology living classroom," focusing on environmental education. And much of the work is being done by children. Youngsters from local schools, especially the Key School in Annapolis and Eastport Elementary School in Eastport, have been yanking out invasive plants and planting more-suitable ones as part of a plan to restore the shoreline along the creek, expand the Osprey Nature Center and install technologies such as green roofs and storm-water filtration systems.
NEWS
February 12, 2011
I read with interest the commentary by Kathi J. Heron entitled "Don't backpedal on environmental ed" (Feb. 11). She is right that environmental education should be a critical component of education in Maryland, particularly from the perspective of developing and nurturing environmental stewardship in our children. However, there is another side to this coin, and that is the relationship between the environment and human health. In teaching environmental education this connection is often missed: What humankind does to the environmental comes back to bite us with regard to our health.
NEWS
By Kathi J. Heron | February 10, 2011
Traditionally, Maryland has been at the head of the class in understanding the value of environmental education. Other states have looked to us for leadership. For example, many states are following the model established in Maryland of partnering state education and natural resources agencies to address environmental literacy. That's why a proposed state regulation last month shocked and disappointed so many teachers, principals and others around Maryland who witness firsthand the benefits of environmental education to students: the enthusiasm generated, the higher test scores, the jobs secured.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | January 13, 2011
The Chesapeake Bay Foundation is concerned that state education officials have created a "major loophole" in the proposed regulations that would make environmental education part of every high-schooler's studies. In September, the Maryland State Board of Education voted unanimously to make environmental literacy part of the curriculum. However, it is not clear whether the vote made it a graduation requirement. The new regulation, which the board is receiving public comment on until Feb. 3, says that students must take a social studies course, a science course or an AP Environmental Science course in order to graduate.
NEWS
October 7, 2010
Two years ago, at the age of 17, I had no real plans for the summer. That's when I joined the Civic Justice Corps (CJC) and it changed my life. Started by Gov. Martin O'Malley in 2008, the corps gives students from Baltimore City paid summer jobs at state parks across Maryland. But it was more than just a job. Through the CJC I learned about the environment and life skills that could help me find a job in the future. I enjoyed the program so much I returned as a counselor this year through the Maryland Conservation Corps (MCC)
NEWS
September 22, 2010
State schools Superintendent Nancy S. Grasmick's plan to add environmental education to the curriculum of public elementary, middle and high schools is a welcome move toward making all students more aware of our responsibility to care for the planet and the impact our choices have on it. Many important public policy debates — from climate change and conservation to man-made disasters such as BP's massive oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico —...
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | September 21, 2010
The Maryland State Board of Education voted unanimously Tuesday to make environmental education a part of every student's education, but put off making it a graduation requirement. The Chesapeake Bay Foundation, which had advocated for making environmental studies a part of the curriculum, had hoped for stronger requirements than what was passed by the board, but the nonprofit advocacy group said the board's action was a "partial victory. " Under the new regulation, high school students will not need to take any additional courses, but environmental education will be added into existing courses, such as biology.
NEWS
February 25, 1992
Blue crabs, bird islands, environmental education and microscopic animals in the Chesapeake Bay will be discussed in an Eastern Shore lecture series beginning Feb. 26.The four talks, given by scientists from the University of Maryland's Horn Point environmental laboratory in Cambridge, are free and open to the public. All lectures begin at 7:30 p.m. For more information, call 1-410-228-9250. The schedule:* Feb. 26: "Nature's Shortcut to a More Efficient Food Chain," by Dr. Diane Stoecker.
NEWS
By Dail Willis and Dail Willis,SUN STAFF | April 20, 1996
CROCHERON -- On a clear day, you can see the Western Shore from the finger of land called Bishops Head. The buildings across the Chesapeake rise gently on the horizon.But, like the rest of civilization, it's merely a distant shadow here in the Dorchester County marsh. This is a wild place, a place for ducks, herons, fish -- and students.The wildlife lives here, and the students can visit, thanks to the Karen Noonan Center for Environmental Education, which officially opens today.The center, a converted hunting lodge that sleeps 24, is the newest educational facility of the Chesapeake Bay Foundation.
NEWS
By Martin O'Malley | July 27, 2010
Every child deserves the right to discover and enjoy our natural world — to catch a fish, camp under the stars, follow a trail and play and learn outdoors in countless other ways. These life-changing experiences help children grow stronger, smarter and healthier, and develop a sense of responsibility for our water, land and wildlife. This is why I created the Maryland Partnership for Children in Nature in 2008 to develop a plan to make sure every Maryland child has the opportunity to learn about and connect with nature.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,jonathan.pitts@baltsun.com | November 1, 2009
She sees herself as lucky to be part of a seminal moment in her field's history. But environmental educator Bronwyn Mitchell helped make that moment happen. Nine months ago, when she became executive director of the Maryland Association for Environmental and Outdoor Education, Mitchell knew the influential nonprofit organization would be celebrating 25 years of existence in 2010. She also knew Americans have generally come around to realizing that a passion for the environment need not be the sole preserve of a few neo-hippie types.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.