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NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | March 23, 2004
Two days after the start of spring, a series of events on environmental design and livable communities to promote ideas on how to make the city's air, water and earth cleaner were launched yesterday. Dubbed Baltimore Green Week 2004, the series opened last night in Canton with a town meeting on "green" building design, highlighting clean environmental building practices. In addition to the town meeting, other Green Week events include a movie at 7 tonight, The Next Industrial Revolution, narrated by Susan Sarandon, at the Rotunda Cinematheque, 711 W. 40th St. It takes a look at an architect and a chemist, William McDonough and Michael Braungart, leaders in a movement to change the relationship between commerce and nature.
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BUSINESS
By Nicholas Fouriezos, The Baltimore Sun | October 16, 2013
The hometown Orioles missed the playoffs, but Baltimore-based Ashton Design still has a rooting interest in this year's Major League Baseball postseason. The design firm helped develop graphics at Dodger Stadium and Fenway Park, the homes, respectively, of the Los Angeles Dodgers and Boston Red Sox. Ashton Design completed the enivornmental graphics for Dodgers Stadium this spring, as part of a larger renovation of the 51-year-old venue. The company has done work at Fenway since 2002.
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NEWS
By Laura McCandlish and Laura McCandlish,Sun Reporter | October 21, 2007
A green building tax credit for businesses that construct or renovate their commercial or industrial properties with environmentally friendly features could be included in the legislative package the Carroll County commissioners ask state legislators to pass during the next General Assembly session. Carroll County's proposal comes as several area jurisdictions, including Howard, Montgomery and Baltimore City and County, are enacting green building standards. While Howard County will require that any proposed commercial building of 50,000 square feet or more obtain certification through the U.S. Green Building Council, Carroll officials said they would keep these environmental goals optional.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar and The Baltimore Sun | January 25, 2013
Almost 11 million square feet of building space in Maryland was designated last year as environmentally friendly, making it one of the top-ranking states for such certifications in 2012. Only five states other than Maryland had more space per capita stamped with the LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) seal last year, according to a recent statement by the U.S. Green Building Council. Washington, D.C., Virginia, Colorado, Massachusetts and Illinois were the handful of jurisdictions that surpassed Maryland in the standings, which take into account commercial and institutional buildings.
NEWS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,SUN STAFF | January 28, 2004
A committee is being formed to examine ways that Carroll County government can implement more environmentally sound and efficient practices in constructing and maintaining its facilities. In a presentation yesterday before the county commissioners, a Maryland Department of Natural Resources planner described how local governments can minimize environmental impact in designing, constructing, operating and maintaining their buildings. Called "sustainable development," such techniques use the structure and surrounding natural resources in every aspect of design and construction, said Sean McGuire of DNR's Environmental Design Program.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | March 10, 2003
An old farmhouse turned lumberyard on Route 175 in Jessup soon will become a local showcase for environmental friendliness and an incubator for green company startups, if Stanley Sersen has his way. The president of Architectural Support Group Inc., a Glen Burnie company that helps builders incorporate solar panels and windmills to condominiums and apartments, plans to transform the aged brown and yellow eyesore into an office, resource center, incubator...
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar and The Baltimore Sun | January 25, 2013
Almost 11 million square feet of building space in Maryland was designated last year as environmentally friendly, making it one of the top-ranking states for such certifications in 2012. Only five states other than Maryland had more space per capita stamped with the LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) seal last year, according to a recent statement by the U.S. Green Building Council. Washington, D.C., Virginia, Colorado, Massachusetts and Illinois were the handful of jurisdictions that surpassed Maryland in the standings, which take into account commercial and institutional buildings.
BUSINESS
By Nicholas Fouriezos, The Baltimore Sun | October 16, 2013
The hometown Orioles missed the playoffs, but Baltimore-based Ashton Design still has a rooting interest in this year's Major League Baseball postseason. The design firm helped develop graphics at Dodger Stadium and Fenway Park, the homes, respectively, of the Los Angeles Dodgers and Boston Red Sox. Ashton Design completed the enivornmental graphics for Dodgers Stadium this spring, as part of a larger renovation of the 51-year-old venue. The company has done work at Fenway since 2002.
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 21, 2005
At Harford Community College, environmental awareness starts at the top. The rooftop, that is. Three "green roofs" are part of ambitious renovations and expansions on campus. The roofs, which were planted this summer, include greenery that will insulate the buildings in winter, cool them in summer and protect them from weather damage year-round. The plants were grown by Emory Knoll Farms in nearby Street, one of a few nurseries nationwide specializing in green roofs. Edmund Snodgrass, the owner of Emory Knoll Farms, said eight species are being used, all hardy succulents that can store water for long periods of drought and perennials that will return year after year.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | October 8, 2001
Peer from a footbridge over Dead Run along the Gwynns Falls trail in West Baltimore, and you'll find mysterious white lines rippling from rocks. The ripples aren't water, and yet they imitate water, and broadcast its vibrancy, even when seemingly still. Coming upon the whirling lines is like coming upon a crop circle, or an enigmatic ancient ruin. Brooke Sturtevant, a recent graduate of the Maryland Institute College of Art, created these ripples with a little trickery and a lot of sensitivity to the fluid environment she worked in. As a kid, she fairly lived in the woods behind her Harford County home, and as a student in an environmental sculpture class, her interests in nature and art converged with a certainty unusual in someone so young.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | September 1, 2010
Motorists zipping along the Jones Falls Expressway on their way into and out of the city may not have noticed, but there's an extreme greenery makeover under way there. It's not exactly scenic right now — just long brown swaths of dead vines, tree stumps and brush along each side of the highway. Killing off the existing vegetation, however, is the opening move in a months-long landscaping effort by the State Highway Administration to replace thickets of exotic, invasive vines with new grass and trees, many of them native to Maryland.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts | ed.gunts@baltsun.com | December 9, 2009
When the owners of Baltimore's Black Olive restaurant began formulating plans to build an inn one block away, the word "green" still referred to a color more than an environmental movement. But in the 10 years that the project has been under development, builders have learned plenty about "eco-friendly" design, including which green features are mostly marketing gimmicks and which really can have a lasting impact. When it opens next year, the $6 million Inn at the Black Olive won't be the first local hotel and marketplace with a green roof or bamboo woodwork.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,tim.wheeler@baltsun.com | September 7, 2009
CALIFORNIA, Md. - - Approaching Evergreen Elementary, it's clear right away that there's something different about this new school. A pair of silo-like structures squats in front of the two-story brick building - cisterns storing rainwater for flushing the toilets. Then there are the cactuses and other plants growing atop the entrance canopy - put there to soak up more rain. Evergreen represents the latest in green school design in Maryland. The $20 million elementary school, which started classes last week in this woodsy, suburban community in St. Mary's County, has been designed and built to save bundles of energy and water, and to reduce the building's impact on nearby streams and wetlands.
NEWS
By Laura McCandlish and Laura McCandlish,Sun Reporter | October 21, 2007
A green building tax credit for businesses that construct or renovate their commercial or industrial properties with environmentally friendly features could be included in the legislative package the Carroll County commissioners ask state legislators to pass during the next General Assembly session. Carroll County's proposal comes as several area jurisdictions, including Howard, Montgomery and Baltimore City and County, are enacting green building standards. While Howard County will require that any proposed commercial building of 50,000 square feet or more obtain certification through the U.S. Green Building Council, Carroll officials said they would keep these environmental goals optional.
NEWS
By JOE PALAZZOLO and JOE PALAZZOLO,SUN REPORTER | March 12, 2006
Four trash bags are piled near a "No Dumping" sign. Old tires are strewn on the sidewalk by a garage. A black plastic bag sails on a gust of wind. Trash represents a serious environmental threat in Pigtown - along with lead paint, rats and clogged storm drains, according to the Maryland Department of Environment. That's why the state has designated the Washington Village/Pigtown community an Environmental Benefits District, giving it priority access to state aid and creating a web of support that links federal, state, and local governments to residents and local businesses.
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 21, 2005
At Harford Community College, environmental awareness starts at the top. The rooftop, that is. Three "green roofs" are part of ambitious renovations and expansions on campus. The roofs, which were planted this summer, include greenery that will insulate the buildings in winter, cool them in summer and protect them from weather damage year-round. The plants were grown by Emory Knoll Farms in nearby Street, one of a few nurseries nationwide specializing in green roofs. Edmund Snodgrass, the owner of Emory Knoll Farms, said eight species are being used, all hardy succulents that can store water for long periods of drought and perennials that will return year after year.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | September 1, 2010
Motorists zipping along the Jones Falls Expressway on their way into and out of the city may not have noticed, but there's an extreme greenery makeover under way there. It's not exactly scenic right now — just long brown swaths of dead vines, tree stumps and brush along each side of the highway. Killing off the existing vegetation, however, is the opening move in a months-long landscaping effort by the State Highway Administration to replace thickets of exotic, invasive vines with new grass and trees, many of them native to Maryland.
NEWS
By JOE PALAZZOLO and JOE PALAZZOLO,SUN REPORTER | March 12, 2006
Four trash bags are piled near a "No Dumping" sign. Old tires are strewn on the sidewalk by a garage. A black plastic bag sails on a gust of wind. Trash represents a serious environmental threat in Pigtown - along with lead paint, rats and clogged storm drains, according to the Maryland Department of Environment. That's why the state has designated the Washington Village/Pigtown community an Environmental Benefits District, giving it priority access to state aid and creating a web of support that links federal, state, and local governments to residents and local businesses.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | March 23, 2004
Two days after the start of spring, a series of events on environmental design and livable communities to promote ideas on how to make the city's air, water and earth cleaner were launched yesterday. Dubbed Baltimore Green Week 2004, the series opened last night in Canton with a town meeting on "green" building design, highlighting clean environmental building practices. In addition to the town meeting, other Green Week events include a movie at 7 tonight, The Next Industrial Revolution, narrated by Susan Sarandon, at the Rotunda Cinematheque, 711 W. 40th St. It takes a look at an architect and a chemist, William McDonough and Michael Braungart, leaders in a movement to change the relationship between commerce and nature.
NEWS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,SUN STAFF | January 28, 2004
A committee is being formed to examine ways that Carroll County government can implement more environmentally sound and efficient practices in constructing and maintaining its facilities. In a presentation yesterday before the county commissioners, a Maryland Department of Natural Resources planner described how local governments can minimize environmental impact in designing, constructing, operating and maintaining their buildings. Called "sustainable development," such techniques use the structure and surrounding natural resources in every aspect of design and construction, said Sean McGuire of DNR's Environmental Design Program.
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