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Environmental Degradation

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By Mark Hofberg | December 10, 2013
What can I do to help the environment? As a master's student in conservation biology and environmental policy, I get this question often from my (mostly) left-leaning, but financially focused, friends. They generally understand that the environment is important, but with long work hours and an overflow "green" products and tips in the media, there is confusion about what is effective or even useful. There is a simple way to help; one that does not require wearing hemp or even scrapping your car (although that would be nice)
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NEWS
By Mark Hofberg | December 10, 2013
What can I do to help the environment? As a master's student in conservation biology and environmental policy, I get this question often from my (mostly) left-leaning, but financially focused, friends. They generally understand that the environment is important, but with long work hours and an overflow "green" products and tips in the media, there is confusion about what is effective or even useful. There is a simple way to help; one that does not require wearing hemp or even scrapping your car (although that would be nice)
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NEWS
By Edward Flattau | January 30, 1996
WASHINGTON -- In the wrangling between the White House and the Republican congressional majority over tax reform, no one is considering a levy with the greatest long-term potential to redress the budget deficit, environmental degradation and the burden of heavy taxation.2 Ed Flattau writes a column on the environment.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | April 22, 2013
Today is Earth Day , a day when environmentalists and concerned citizens around the world demonstrate their caring for the health of their communities, the natural world and the planet. Forty-three years ago, the first Earth Day drew an estimated 20 million Americans into the streets, into parks and onto campuses for teach-ins and protests over environmental degradation.  Organizers today claim the observance has gone global, with more than 1 billion participants. Earth Day helped launch the modern environmental movement, which provided public pressure for passage of many of the environmental laws we have today.  Like the movement, its focus has shifted from fighting obvious air and water pollution to knottier issues around how and where we live, and what we consume, most notably climate change.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | April 22, 2013
Today is Earth Day , a day when environmentalists and concerned citizens around the world demonstrate their caring for the health of their communities, the natural world and the planet. Forty-three years ago, the first Earth Day drew an estimated 20 million Americans into the streets, into parks and onto campuses for teach-ins and protests over environmental degradation.  Organizers today claim the observance has gone global, with more than 1 billion participants. Earth Day helped launch the modern environmental movement, which provided public pressure for passage of many of the environmental laws we have today.  Like the movement, its focus has shifted from fighting obvious air and water pollution to knottier issues around how and where we live, and what we consume, most notably climate change.
NEWS
July 19, 1991
For all intents and purposes, the United States has no energy policy, and to most people the problem -- and the solution -- is self-evident: Develop alternative energy sources and efficient mass transportation. But President Bush, a Texas oil man, comes at the issue from an odd perspective. His approach to the energy problem has been simply: Drill more wells and pump more oil.One obvious result is traffic-choked highways dotted with stress and blaring car horns. The less perceptible but more threatening result is environmental degradation -- increased use of automobiles and gasoline not only pollute the air but also contribute to the erosion of the fragile ozone layer, which protects the Earth from the sun's harmful ultra-violet rays.
NEWS
By SARA ENGRAM | March 17, 1991
Now that the fighting is over in the Persian Gulf, the United States reigns as the lone undisputed superpower, and the old East-West way of looking at the world is obsolete. What comes next?Russell A. Mittermeier, president of Conservation International, an innovative environmental group based in Washington, D.C., has an urgent suggestion -- a more comprehensive view of the world that takes into account the volatile gap between the economic "haves" and "have nots." Traditionally, that gap has been cast in terms of a north-south split.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Staff Writer | January 30, 1993
WASHINGTON -- A disastrous food shortage threatens many of the world's poorer nations, especially in Africa and South Asia, by the end of the decade, a panel of agriculture experts warned yesterday.Population growth, environmental degradation and slowing food production make other countries besides Somalia ripe for famine, the panel said. And foreign aid for Third World farmers is dwindling at a time when more help is needed."Without more action now, we will, 20 years from now, look back on current food problems as insignificant," said Per Pinstrup-Andersen, director general of the International Food Policy Research Institute, which organized the symposium.
NEWS
By Paul Lewis and Paul Lewis,New York Times News Service | April 5, 1992
UNITED NATIONS -- Representatives from more than 160 nations agreed early yesterday on a document that commits the industrial nations of the Northern Hemisphere to help poorer Southern Hemisphere countries develop in a way that will not damage the environment.The document, in draft form, was the only full accord resulting from five weeks of U.N. negotiations in preparation for an international environmental conference in Rio de Janeiro in June.Three other major issues taken up in the preparatory negotiations remain unresolved.
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD | April 22, 2004
IT WAS AFTER GETTING another alarming glimpse of Bob Dylan's frozen mug in that commercial for Victoria's Secret that I realized the whole concept behind celebrity product endorsements escapes me. Let's examine that Victoria's Secret commercial for a moment. OK, here's a company selling a product, namely sexy lingerie. It's a company that promotes a certain image of itself. An image of eternal youth. An image of playfulness. An image of sex appeal. In fact, the image of sex is promoted so relentlessly you get the feeling Victoria's Secret believes most of the world's ills - including war, poverty and environmental degradation - would largely disappear if only women would show more cleavage.
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD | April 22, 2004
IT WAS AFTER GETTING another alarming glimpse of Bob Dylan's frozen mug in that commercial for Victoria's Secret that I realized the whole concept behind celebrity product endorsements escapes me. Let's examine that Victoria's Secret commercial for a moment. OK, here's a company selling a product, namely sexy lingerie. It's a company that promotes a certain image of itself. An image of eternal youth. An image of playfulness. An image of sex appeal. In fact, the image of sex is promoted so relentlessly you get the feeling Victoria's Secret believes most of the world's ills - including war, poverty and environmental degradation - would largely disappear if only women would show more cleavage.
NEWS
September 14, 1999
A bright future is possible, if we care for the planetMike Scott should be commended for his article, "Waste not, want not, so recycle," (Opinion Commentary, Sept. 6). He helped us look beyond the moment to a future that could be bright, if each of us takes responsibility for recycling and reusing as much as possible.One person can make a difference. By handling our recyclables in ways that keep them from landfills and incinerators, we help keep the air and earth cleaner and set an example for others.
NEWS
By Edward Flattau | January 30, 1996
WASHINGTON -- In the wrangling between the White House and the Republican congressional majority over tax reform, no one is considering a levy with the greatest long-term potential to redress the budget deficit, environmental degradation and the burden of heavy taxation.2 Ed Flattau writes a column on the environment.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Staff Writer | January 30, 1993
WASHINGTON -- A disastrous food shortage threatens many of the world's poorer nations, especially in Africa and South Asia, by the end of the decade, a panel of agriculture experts warned yesterday.Population growth, environmental degradation and slowing food production make other countries besides Somalia ripe for famine, the panel said. And foreign aid for Third World farmers is dwindling at a time when more help is needed."Without more action now, we will, 20 years from now, look back on current food problems as insignificant," said Per Pinstrup-Andersen, director general of the International Food Policy Research Institute, which organized the symposium.
NEWS
By Paul Lewis and Paul Lewis,New York Times News Service | April 5, 1992
UNITED NATIONS -- Representatives from more than 160 nations agreed early yesterday on a document that commits the industrial nations of the Northern Hemisphere to help poorer Southern Hemisphere countries develop in a way that will not damage the environment.The document, in draft form, was the only full accord resulting from five weeks of U.N. negotiations in preparation for an international environmental conference in Rio de Janeiro in June.Three other major issues taken up in the preparatory negotiations remain unresolved.
NEWS
July 19, 1991
For all intents and purposes, the United States has no energy policy, and to most people the problem -- and the solution -- is self-evident: Develop alternative energy sources and efficient mass transportation. But President Bush, a Texas oil man, comes at the issue from an odd perspective. His approach to the energy problem has been simply: Drill more wells and pump more oil.One obvious result is traffic-choked highways dotted with stress and blaring car horns. The less perceptible but more threatening result is environmental degradation -- increased use of automobiles and gasoline not only pollute the air but also contribute to the erosion of the fragile ozone layer, which protects the Earth from the sun's harmful ultra-violet rays.
NEWS
September 14, 1999
A bright future is possible, if we care for the planetMike Scott should be commended for his article, "Waste not, want not, so recycle," (Opinion Commentary, Sept. 6). He helped us look beyond the moment to a future that could be bright, if each of us takes responsibility for recycling and reusing as much as possible.One person can make a difference. By handling our recyclables in ways that keep them from landfills and incinerators, we help keep the air and earth cleaner and set an example for others.
NEWS
January 10, 2011
Property owners in Western Maryland willing to believe the claims that the extraction of underground natural gas through hydraulic fracturing can be done cleanly and safely without permanent harmful environmental impact might want to consider buying a capped BP Deepwater Horizon oil rig in the Gulf of Mexico. Even large short-term profits are not worth permanent toxic pollution and environmental degradation. Anyone interested in this issue should view the website and/or the trailer (on YouTube)
NEWS
By SARA ENGRAM | March 17, 1991
Now that the fighting is over in the Persian Gulf, the United States reigns as the lone undisputed superpower, and the old East-West way of looking at the world is obsolete. What comes next?Russell A. Mittermeier, president of Conservation International, an innovative environmental group based in Washington, D.C., has an urgent suggestion -- a more comprehensive view of the world that takes into account the volatile gap between the economic "haves" and "have nots." Traditionally, that gap has been cast in terms of a north-south split.
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