Advertisement
HomeCollectionsEnvironmental Center
IN THE NEWS

Environmental Center

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Donna E. Boller and Donna E. Boller,Staff writer | January 13, 1991
County officials are seeking $3.3 million to buy nearly 1,000 acres in the Middle Patuxent River stream valley for an environmental education center.School officials say it is increasingly difficult to reserve time for county students at out-of-county environmental centers and may be squeezed out. For the first time in 19 years, there maynot be space at those centers this year for all the middle schools that usually participate, said Alice W. Haskins, director...
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,meredith.cohn@baltsun.com | October 10, 2009
The decrepit mansion once served as home to the president of the Maryland Zoo in Baltimore, but two decades of brush has grown and, along with vandals, has made it uninhabitable. Cue the goats. In what's the first step to a $10 million project to transform this piece of Druid Hill Park into an environmental and recreational center for the city, the four-legged weed whackers have cleared a half-acre ring of ivy and other invasive species. The herd of 40 will be brought back to clear the rest of the 9-acre parcel that few have used, legally anyway, for years.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Chris Yakaitis and Chris Yakaitis,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 2, 2005
The Chesapeake Bay is full of surprises. In the early moments of Wednesday evening's "Wetlands by Canoe" tour sponsored by the Chesapeake Bay Environmental Center in Grasonville, one visitor spots a furry head drifting through the water in Marshy Creek, a protected cove off the Chester River. "Oh my goodness!" says Shelby Laubhan, 24, the evening's guide. "We do have a little mammal critter up here." Eventually, the group determines that it has been treated to an otter sighting. Laubhan has led canoe tours since June 2004, but this is her first such spotting.
NEWS
December 18, 2008
Basic boot camp to be held in January Children ages 6 to 12 who are wondering what military life is like can get a taste of it at the Navy Way Basic Boot Camp sponsored by the Armel-Leftwich Visitor Center of the U.S. Naval Academy. The camp will be held 10 a.m. to noon Jan. 24. Recruits will receive a sailor's cap, learn Navy terms, march, chant, follow orders and eat in a simulated mess area. The cost is $35. Children receive a certificate of participation at graduation. Gift certificates are available for those registering a child and wish to give it as a Christmas or Hanukkah gift.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,Staff Writer | July 7, 1992
Thirty years ago, the notion of creating marsh where there was none would have been dismissed in the scientific world. This year, a marsh-creation project earned Anne Arundel Community College's Environmental Center a national award.A council of 28 environmental organizations included the project in an annual index of environmental projects compiled by Renew America, a Washington-based clearinghouse of information on the environment.In a news release, Renew America's executive director Tina Hobson said the project -- which has salvaged more than a half-mile of eroding beach along the Severn River -- "sets a positive example that can help other communities meet similar environmental challenges."
NEWS
By Samuel Goldreich and Samuel Goldreich,Staff writer | June 16, 1991
Julie Thompson had a hard time establishing curbside recycling in her Jarrettsville neighborhood when she left bins for glass, cans and plastic at the dead end of Trout Farm Road."
NEWS
By Matt Kasper and Matt Kasper,SUN STAFF | January 4, 2004
After 32 years of service and recognition as the oldest continuing recycling center in the country, the Susquehannock Environmental Center on North Tollgate Road will close this month. A combination of waning profits, declining service and overall fatigue finally took its toll, causing the board to vote to close the center, said Clifton Dowling, head of the board of directors. "As a board, we're tired," Dowling said after noting that since the country curbside pickup program went into effect in 1994, the center has seen a steady decline of recyclable material.
NEWS
By Staff Report | June 13, 1993
Twelve Harford County high school students recentl received a total of $14,000 in college scholarships for excellence in environmental study and awareness.The students were honored May 26 at a reception sponsored by the Susquehannock Environmental Center, a nonprofit recycling facility near Bel Air that also promotes environmental education.The third annual scholarship program was sponsored jointly by the center and the Harford County school system, with help from local businesses.The scholarship recipients, many of them participants in ecology clubs at their schools, "were really inspirational with their peers," said Bob Chance, president of Susquehannock Environmental Center and an environmental educator in the school system.
NEWS
By Lois Szymanski and Lois Szymanski,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 9, 1996
FUN, HONEY-RELATED FOODS and the opportunity to study bees in the wild can be found Sunday at the annual Honey Harvest Festival at the Hashawha Environmental Center outside Westminster.The event, which runs from noon to 5 p.m., will feature hayrides for children, an auction and country crafts. Cooking demonstrations, bee shows and demonstrations of pioneer skills will round out the program.Visitors can see an apiary (in which bees are kept). An observation hive will display bees working, and visitors might catch a glimpse of a queen bee .An Early Bird Honey and Pancake Brunch will be held from 10: 30 a.m. to 1 p.m. The National Honey Queen will greet visitors all day, and Free Wheeling will provide music.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,Staff writer | May 12, 1991
After 22 years of study, the county appears ready to acquire more than 900 rustic acres along the banks of the Middle Patuxent River for use as a nature park and environmental education center.A report by a 12-member panel that will be presented Wednesday night to the Recreation and Parks Board meeting calls for the county to acquire the Middle Patuxent Environmental Area from the Rouse Co. later this year.The report recommends that the county use state money to buy the land between routes 32 and 108 just west of Columbia and that the Rouse Co. put the purchase price in a perpetual trust that would be used to help "operate and maintain" the area.
NEWS
By Jasmine Jernberg | June 15, 2008
A fierce storm that tore through the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center has sidelined one of its most popular programs: its educational canoe tours. High winds June 4 downed trees, knocked out power and phone lines and destroyed eight of the Edgewater facility's 10-canoe fleet, along with a canoe shed and a canoe stand recently built by a volunteer Eagle Scout. Canoeing programs at SERC have been suspended until further notice, center officials announced last week. The hiking trails have been cleaned of debris and electricity restored - after being out for up to 67 hours - but the solution is not as simple for the canoe program.
FEATURES
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,Special to The Sun | September 20, 2007
Like many busy people, Julie Dixon fits exercise into her schedule with great finesse. In between her part-time job as a licensed counselor and the soccer and field hockey games, play dates and homework that accompany caring for three children, she sandwiches a little running here. A little tennis there. An hour at the gym a few mornings a week. Some kayaking on the weekends. On Saturday, the Queenstown resident plans to test just how fit she is by competing with a teammate in the Chesapeake Bay Eco-Tri, a triathlon being held for the first time at the Chesapeake Bay Environmental Center in Grasonville.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,Sun reporter | October 6, 2006
Taking in the water gleaming through trees changing colors in the October light, Sally Brucker was mesmerized during her first visit to the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center grounds. "I don't want to leave. I'm so happy there are no shopping malls," said Brucker, an art therapist from Takoma Park. At the high-powered government facility, they will be happy to have her back. SERC, as the Edgewater campus is known, is opening its doors wider than ever.
NEWS
By CASSANDRA A. FORTIN and CASSANDRA A. FORTIN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 19, 2006
Susan Havran almost stepped on a brown snake. Patricia Hanson confronted her fear of spiders. Andrew Siegel took up nature photography. They were among dozens of pupils who embarked on an outdoor adventure to gather ideas for an art project with a lofty purpose: creating murals to mark the 25th anniversary of the nature education program at Harford Glen Environmental Education Center. The center has been home to programs for county schoolchildren since 1948, when the Board of Education signed a lease for the property that consists of 245 acres and a 75-acre lake.
NEWS
September 4, 2005
Real estate agency sets seminars for this month Long & Foster Realtors will hold seminars on "A Career in Real Estate" for people considering entering that profession. Tuesday: 6 p.m., Deale office, 5544 Muddy Creek Road, West River, 410-867-1000. Sept. 20: 6 p.m., Pasadena office, 4100 D Mountain Road, 410-437-9000. Pentagon briefing among chamber events in Sept. The Baltimore/Washington Corridor Chamber of Commerce has announced events for this month. Tuesday: "Briefing from the Pentagon" from 9:30 a.m. to 11 a.m. at the Conference Center at the Maritime Institute, 692 Maritime Blvd.
NEWS
By Chris Yakaitis and Chris Yakaitis,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 2, 2005
The Chesapeake Bay is full of surprises. In the early moments of Wednesday evening's "Wetlands by Canoe" tour sponsored by the Chesapeake Bay Environmental Center in Grasonville, one visitor spots a furry head drifting through the water in Marshy Creek, a protected cove off the Chester River. "Oh my goodness!" says Shelby Laubhan, 24, the evening's guide. "We do have a little mammal critter up here." Eventually, the group determines that it has been treated to an otter sighting. Laubhan has led canoe tours since June 2004, but this is her first such spotting.
NEWS
December 18, 2008
Basic boot camp to be held in January Children ages 6 to 12 who are wondering what military life is like can get a taste of it at the Navy Way Basic Boot Camp sponsored by the Armel-Leftwich Visitor Center of the U.S. Naval Academy. The camp will be held 10 a.m. to noon Jan. 24. Recruits will receive a sailor's cap, learn Navy terms, march, chant, follow orders and eat in a simulated mess area. The cost is $35. Children receive a certificate of participation at graduation. Gift certificates are available for those registering a child and wish to give it as a Christmas or Hanukkah gift.
NEWS
By Lane Harvey Brown and Lane Harvey Brown,SUN STAFF | October 17, 2002
Aberdeen Proving Ground unveiled a first-of-its-kind test site yesterday that will help develop better methods to detect unexploded munitions left after testing - a pervasive and dangerous problem for the Department of Defense that could cost tens of billions of dollars to clean up. The $1.5 million test site, jointly funded by several defense agencies, will allow the military to work with private companies to find safer, less expensive methods of...
NEWS
May 22, 2005
Last week's question: The Pentagon has proposed a realignment of its bases. If the plan is adopted as written, Aberdeen Proving Ground will gain thousands of jobs. However, the base, the county's largest employer, would lose the well-known Ordnance Center and School that has been a part of the community since World War I. That operation and its thousands of jobs would be sent to Fort Lee, Va. George Mercer, a spokesman for APG, said the Ordnance Center is the installation where the Army trains mechanical and maintenance soldiers to repair motors, tanks, trucks and other equipment.
NEWS
By Ellie Baublitz and Ellie Baublitz,SUN STAFF | April 25, 2004
Carroll County's two largest parks offer residents and visitors who love the outdoors a range of activities for all ages. The crown jewel of the park system is the 833-acre Piney Run Park, which includes a 300-acre man-made lake and a nature center that caters to all ages. Opened in 1976 in the southeast corner of the county, Piney Run attracts 100,000 visitors a year for fishing, boating, walking, picnicking, basketball, volleyball, tennis, cross country skiing, and environmental and educational programs, plus two special events -- a herb festival in spring and apple festival in fall.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.