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NEWS
July 17, 1996
A torrent of storm water that coursed through Central Maryland as Tropical Storm Bertha moved up the coast has forced the state to prohibit fishing for shellfish in the Patapsco River and parts of the Chesapeake Bay.When Bertha hit the Baltimore area Saturday, heavy rainfall caused storm water runoff greater than the capacity of the Patapsco Wastewater Treatment Plant. The plant discharged more than 300 million gallons of inadequately treated wastewater into the Patapsco River late Saturday and early Sunday, the Maryland Department of the Environment said.
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BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | July 28, 2014
Two major Eastern railroads have filed lawsuits against the Maryland Department of Environment to block it from disclosing their shipments of crude oil through the state, according to court records. Norfolk Southern Railway and CSX Transportation claim the release of the information would pose a security threat and compromise commercially sensitive information, according to complaints filed in Baltimore Circuit Court. The federal government began requiring railroads in May to report all shipments of more than one million gallons of Bakken crude oil to emergency officials in the states the shipments pass through, following several rail accidents involving the volatile fuel.
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BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | July 28, 2014
Two major Eastern railroads have filed lawsuits against the Maryland Department of Environment to block it from disclosing their shipments of crude oil through the state, according to court records. Norfolk Southern Railway and CSX Transportation claim the release of the information would pose a security threat and compromise commercially sensitive information, according to complaints filed in Baltimore Circuit Court. The federal government began requiring railroads in May to report all shipments of more than one million gallons of Bakken crude oil to emergency officials in the states the shipments pass through, following several rail accidents involving the volatile fuel.
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | May 31, 2000
Tests show that chemicals stored in a South Baltimore warehouse owned by a Carroll County man are both "hazardous" and "corrosive," the Maryland Department of the Environment reported yesterday. The department has not identified the chemicals, but it said they are so acidic that they ate through metal drums. The chemicals leaked onto the floor and out a door of the warehouse to an area where children often play. Investigators also found asbestos-laden ceiling tiles in a heap outside the building, which is at 1700 Clarkson St. "We know it's a hazardous material, but we haven't done a complete analysis," said MDE spokesman Richard McIntire.
NEWS
By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,Staff writer | March 1, 1992
Maryland Reclamation Associates Inc. has received a state permit to build and operate a rubble and asbestos fill near Havre de Grace.Maryland Reclamation's proposal for the 68-acre dump on Gravel Hill Road has stirred controversy for more than two years. The dispute has resulted in several lawsuits between the company, the county and residents opposed to the plan.The Churchville-based company was granted the permit by the stateDepartment of the Environment. The department said, however, it willnot allow the company to begin construction until a county zoning dispute is resolved.
NEWS
By Bruce Reid and Bruce Reid,Staff Writer | December 27, 1992
The state Department of the Environment says it intends to deny a permit application for a controversial sludge-drying operation in northern Harford County if the operator does not withdraw the application and submit a new one.The operation, Chesapeake Resource Reclamation Center in Whiteford, is seeking a state groundwater-discharge permit to continue accepting "alum" sludge, a waste product generated when municipal water-treatment plants use an aluminum compound...
NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,Staff Writer | June 12, 1992
The state Department of the Environment will review its decision to grant permission for Annapolis Mall to expand, a department spokesman said yesterday, one day after Woodward Lothrop Inc. raised new allegations in its fight against the expansion.Woodies, embroiled in a public squabble over the mall's plans to add a Nordstrom department store and 45 smaller stores, has asked the state to revoke or modify the mall's approval for a storm-water management pond.In a June 10 letter to department Secretary Robert Perciasepe, Woodies' attorneys charge that the proposed storm-water basin would violate environmental laws and increase chances of downstream erosion, undercutting stream banks and washing out trees and vegetation.
NEWS
By Consella A. Lee and Consella A. Lee,Sun Staff Writer | June 2, 1995
The state Department of the Environment has granted a 90-day operating permit to a pharmaceutical plant in Brooklyn Park that closed two years ago after a grand jury indicted its owner for environmental violations.Consolidated Pharmaceuticals Group Inc., the new owner of the plant in the 6100 block of Robinwood Road, could resume production of penicillin this year.Last week, the state agency issued a temporary operating permit and a permit to allow Consolidated to build air pollution controls.
NEWS
September 9, 1992
The state's recent shutdown of the Spencer rubble fill in Abingdon represents an opportunity for the controversial facility to clean up its act. The same goes for Maryland's Department of the Environment and the Harford County government, both of which failed to police the operation.While Spencer Sand & Gravel Inc. claims to be a victim of bureaucratic nitpicking in failing to get the state permit renewed, the dump's record shows otherwise. A string of violations and contamination incidents includes dumping waste outside permitted areas, covering waste improperly and accepting illegal wastes.
NEWS
November 15, 1990
The state's top regulator of industrial sewage, hazardous wastes and landfills has resigned after 10 years at his post to take a job with Anne Arundel County's health department.Ronald Nelson, director of hazardous and solid waste management at the Maryland Department of the Environment, left last week to become environmental health director for the county.Nelson, who has been with the state for 24 years, said he left to pursue different interests and to work closer to his Anne Arundel home.
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | May 16, 2000
The county commissioners are lobbying Gov. Parris N. Glendening to help secure state permits for two projects that have long been on the drawing board -- a well to ease water shortages in South Carroll and a new discharge system for Francis Scott Key High School's idle sewage treatment plant. "These projects cannot move forward until we get permits" from the Maryland Department of the Environment, J. Michael Evans, county director of public works, told the commissioners yesterday. Evans urged the commissioners to ask the governor's office "to make MDE get off the dime."
NEWS
By Tanya Jones and Tanya Jones,SUN STAFF | June 28, 1997
The Maryland Department of the Environment shot down yesterday a development proposal at the heart of a 30-year-old plan for the revitalization of Odenton by denying a permit to build on wetlands at the town center.To start the development, Anne Arundel County and the landowner must find a way to build a retail center without destroying nearly 11 acres of wetlands on a 30-acre parcel off Route 175.Set aside for high-density commercial, office and residential development since 1968, the town center is the nucleus for planned growth in Odenton.
NEWS
July 17, 1996
A torrent of storm water that coursed through Central Maryland as Tropical Storm Bertha moved up the coast has forced the state to prohibit fishing for shellfish in the Patapsco River and parts of the Chesapeake Bay.When Bertha hit the Baltimore area Saturday, heavy rainfall caused storm water runoff greater than the capacity of the Patapsco Wastewater Treatment Plant. The plant discharged more than 300 million gallons of inadequately treated wastewater into the Patapsco River late Saturday and early Sunday, the Maryland Department of the Environment said.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Sun Staff Writer | July 6, 1995
George Perdikakis, who was a longtime official in the Baltimore City government, has been named to head Baltimore County's Department of Environment and Resource Management.Mr. Perdikakis -- who formerly headed the Maryland Environmental Service, and was responsible for its burying the long-burning Granite stump-dump blaze -- will be paid $20,800 more than the current director receives.A 47-year-old resident of Abingdon in Harford County, Mr. Perdikakis will replace J. James Dieter, a 25-year county official who has run the department since Feb. 1991.
NEWS
By Consella A. Lee and Consella A. Lee,Sun Staff Writer | June 2, 1995
The state Department of the Environment has granted a 90-day operating permit to a pharmaceutical plant in Brooklyn Park that closed two years ago after a grand jury indicted its owner for environmental violations.Consolidated Pharmaceuticals Group Inc., the new owner of the plant in the 6100 block of Robinwood Road, could resume production of penicillin this year.Last week, the state agency issued a temporary operating permit and a permit to allow Consolidated to build air pollution controls.
NEWS
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,Sun Staff Writer | May 5, 1995
Here's your chance to get rid of that gas-guzzling, oil-burning, pollution-spewing four-wheeled clunker in the garage -- not the family car but the worn-out lawn mower.The state wants those old machines. It's actually offering rewards.The first 100 people who turn in gasoline-powered mowers tomorrow at an environmental festival in South Baltimore will receive $75 rebates toward a new, "environmentally friendly" machine of their choice -- either an electric one or an old-fashioned reel mower without an engine.
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | May 16, 2000
The county commissioners are lobbying Gov. Parris N. Glendening to help secure state permits for two projects that have long been on the drawing board -- a well to ease water shortages in South Carroll and a new discharge system for Francis Scott Key High School's idle sewage treatment plant. "These projects cannot move forward until we get permits" from the Maryland Department of the Environment, J. Michael Evans, county director of public works, told the commissioners yesterday. Evans urged the commissioners to ask the governor's office "to make MDE get off the dime."
NEWS
By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,Staff writer | April 5, 1992
Harford administrators may have mistakenly exempted a proposed expansion at an Abingdon rubble fill from a law regulating such dumps, a county lawyer said last week.The County Council in January added an 18-acre expansion at the Spencer Sand & Gravel Inc. dump to Harford's solid-waste management plan, thinking the company was exempt from the rubble fill law.The proposed expansion has been the topic of debate among many Abingdon residents, some of whom oppose the plan."If they're included in the plan but they can't comply to the law, they can't do business," Council President Jeffrey Wilson said.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Sun Staff Writer | February 4, 1994
The Maryland Department of the Environment has mishandled, overspent and failed to collect millions of dollars in federal and state funds in the past three years, and it has longstanding lapses in oversight of hazardous wastes, says an audit report released yesterday.In its third blistering review of the department in the past five years, the Office of Legislative Audits found "significant problems" in the agency's handling of federal grants. Also found were overpayments to private contractors, sloppy recordkeeping and poor financial controls that could mask "unauthorized payments."
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