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NEWS
August 22, 2011
Usually I recycle Marta Mossburg's ultra-conservative rants without reading them. But her column "Kids' TV: last bastion of liberal utopia," Aug. 17, was so outrageous, I had to respond. Let me start with this sentence: "Individualism is bad, the collective - and especially the environment - are good. " Individualism is not bad, but it is foolish. Imagine a single person demanding an eight-hour-day. The corporate officials would have been roaring with laughter. In a time when a presidential candidate opines that corporations are people, we better unite as the corporate elite are destroying the middle class and slashing the poor's safety net. I have no idea how anyone would think the environment is bad. We have another presidential candidate who is a climate chaos denier.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2014
To hear Larry Hogan tell it, the multibillion-dollar effort to clean up the Chesapeake Bay has been a dismal failure - and the biggest problem is getting Pennsylvania and New York to stop sending sediment pollution down the Susquehanna River. The Republican gubernatorial candidate vows to "stand up" for Maryland farmers, watermen and homeowners, who he contends have been unfairly burdened with the bay's restoration, and says he'd take the other states to court if necessary to get them to do more.
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NEWS
November 16, 2012
Say no to fracking if you don't want flammable drinking water ("Say yes to LNG," Nov. 13). We shouldn't ruin our drinking water just to deliver liquid natural gas to China. Would they run their tankers on natural gas? The oil is running out, so the cost of transporting anything is rising dramatically. China is a long way away and won't be able to afford it if we don't buy their plastic junk. Germany recently acknowledged that 99 percent of its oil reserves were imaginary, and as a result it has rapidly became a world leader in solar power.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 28, 2014
Families and roommates share plenty — food, bathrooms, dishes. A study published Thursday adds a less visible but ubiquitous item to the list: bacteria. Households carry a common community of bacteria, populating surfaces such as doorknobs, counters and floors, and shared by humans and pets alike, the study found. It travels with us like another member of the family and quickly takes over new environments, such as a new home or even a hotel room, with a distinct signature like fingerprints.
NEWS
November 8, 2011
In Dan Rodricks ' otherwise intriguing discussion of the future of Sparrows Point ("Re-imagining Sparrows Point," Nov. 6) I found the total absence of any mention of environmental impact startling. I believe that we need to include environmental interests at the beginning so it is built into any development plan, not put on as a somewhat unwelcome afterthought. Natalie Dandekar
NEWS
May 25, 2014
The Baltimore School for the Arts is not responsible for Jabril's actions ( "Who is responsible for Jabril?" May 19). If he didn't do what he was supposed to do, then they did what they were supposed to do. When first getting into BSA, you go through an Open House that explains all the requirements and what's expected of you. They say that right of the bat. They also have coach class and Saturday School and after school tutoring with Honor Society...
NEWS
By Nina Beth Cardin | August 11, 2010
Once upon a time, we couldn't ask people not to smoke in our presence. Once upon a time, we couldn't ask people not to drive while drunk. But slowly and with great effort, cultural expectations, public will and the law changed. Through a groundswell of well-managed and well-financed educational campaigns, our attitudes about what was right and what was wrong evolved. Ultimately, both smoking and drunken driving were seen not as private acts protected by the right of self-determination, but as threats to public health that should be regulated on behalf of public welfare.
NEWS
March 28, 2010
Maryland could be the first state in the nation to allow a new class of "for-benefit" corporations if a measure before the House of Delegates receives final approval. The designation, which has already been approved in the Senate, would allow the director of a company to weigh community, environmental and societal factors when making determining the "best interest" of the company. "It is evolving as a national movement," said Del. Brian J. Feldman, a Montgomery County Democrat, during a Saturday debate on the measure.
EXPLORE
July 20, 2011
Thank you for the excellent article about Bill Stromberg and the artists at Charlestown retirement community ("One-man art exhibition features many sides of life," Catonsville Times, July 6). The exhibit of 13 of his works is stunning. Due in part to the fine article by Lauren Fulbright, there was a large crowd at the opening reception on Sunday. Those of us who live at Charlestown are fortunate to have three art studios to work and create in a community of other artists.
EXPLORE
April 19, 2012
Laurel residents Thomas Smith, a student at Atholton High, and Alexandra Barrett, a student at Reservoir High, were among 250 individuals selected as National Youth Delegates to the Washington Youth Summit on the Environment, June 24-29 at George Mason University, in Virginia. They will represent Maryland and were chosen based on academic accomplishments and a demonstrated interest and excellence in leadership in the sciences and conservation studies.
NEWS
Thomas F. Schaller | July 22, 2014
Is there a way to actually unite economic populists on the liberal left and libertarian right? Maybe not. But one promising possibility is the prioritization of American small businesses over powerful, multinational corporate dominance. The events of September 29, 2008, certainly provided a brief glimmer of hope that a hybrid ideological alliance might push back against big business. That day, the U.S. House of Representatives stunned Washington and Wall Street by rejecting the Bush Administration's $700 billion bank bailout, 228 to 205. The Dow Jones Industrial index fell 778 points in a single afternoon, a 7 percent drop.
NEWS
July 16, 2014
Imagine a club that includes people with such diverse public policy opinions as Al Gore and Lindsey Graham, Charles Krauthammer and Paul Krugman, Ralph Nader and Larry Summers. Imagine further that the sole determinant for membership in this club is a belief about how best to achieve the twin goals of environmental protection and funding the public enterprise. There is such a club and it is named for an economist who was born in the 19th century. The Pigou Club began in 2006 at the instigation of Gregory Mankiw who chaired George W. Bush's Council of Economic Advisors from 2003 to 2005.
NEWS
July 12, 2014
Last weekend a 21-year-old University of Maryland student from Randallstown was struck and killed by a minivan ( "University of Maryland, city officials urge pedestrian safety on U.S. 1," July 7). While tragic on its own, two additional pedestrians have been killed in the last six months, all near College Park on U.S. Route 1, the campus' busiest road. State Highway Administration officials have worked to prevent future deaths by posting "No Pedestrian" signs, marking curbs and crosswalks, trimming trees and re-timing traffic signals.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | June 21, 2014
It's hard to see a benefit in a high-profile redevelopment project being delayed four years, but Caroline Moore has found one. Moore, the lead developer for the 28-acre State Center project, said the setback caused by a lawsuit - which was dismissed this spring - has created a chance to incorporate the latest environmental techniques into the designs. The project could introduce Baltimore's first "ecodistrict," creating a zone with a set of common environmental goals and infrastructure systems to help meet the targets.
SPORTS
By Ryan Bacic and The Baltimore Sun | June 20, 2014
Amid the old Terps jerseys and the "Daddy's Girls" picture frame and the College Cup posters in Sasho Cirovski's office sit the Maryland soccer coach's two bookcases. They're packed, he says, with "every coaching book you can imagine. " One book in particular stands out: the autobiography of Manchester United's Sir Alex Ferguson, who before his 2013 retirement won 13 English Premier League titles, 19 domestic cups and two Champions League crowns. He is, in short, probably soccer's most successful manager of all time - and by far its most legendary.
NEWS
May 25, 2014
The Baltimore School for the Arts is not responsible for Jabril's actions ( "Who is responsible for Jabril?" May 19). If he didn't do what he was supposed to do, then they did what they were supposed to do. When first getting into BSA, you go through an Open House that explains all the requirements and what's expected of you. They say that right of the bat. They also have coach class and Saturday School and after school tutoring with Honor Society...
NEWS
January 13, 2014
With so many people interested in eating locally, buying locally, and creating a more sustainable environment, your recent article was very timely ("Resolve to add native plants in 2014," Jan. 9). The insights may be ideas many have heard before, but the reminder to focus on buying what is native, grows well in this zone and promises maximum benefit to the insects and animals that delight our days could not have come at a better time. We need more of these local writings helping guide our garden planning and buying patterns and pointing to the ways each of us affects quality of life issues.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee | March 8, 2012
For four years, Jack McBride ran the offense, scored goals, and absorbed stick checks as an attackman at Princeton. But this season, he has exchanged his black and orange jersey for the powder-blue uniforms given by North Carolina. And with the No. 12 Tar Heels scheduled to meet the No. 20 Tigers at the Konica Minolta Face-Off Classicat M&T Bank Stadium in Baltimore on Saturday, McBride will meet his former Princeton teammates as opponents. And he's not expecting a warm reception.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | May 17, 2014
A 30-second TV spot by Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler touts his record enforcing environmental laws, vowing that if he's elected governor he'll continue to fight for clean air and a clean Chesapeake Bay. What the ad says : The spot opens with Gansler standing in front of a pair of smokestacks. He says as attorney general, he has forced utilities to install more than $4 billion in pollution controls. He then says he wants to "take on polluters" to save the bay and contends that Maryland currently "protects" companies that dump waste into the bay, keeping their identities secret. "Polluters bought that loophole," he says, and vows as governor to take them on. The facts: The ad overstates Gansler's role in getting the pollution controls.
NEWS
By Earl Johnson and Gerrie Okwesa | May 6, 2014
Baltimore is in many respects a charming city, with its row houses, historic neighborhoods and miles of waterfront. But our city also has a not-so-charming problem with trash. And a major contributor is the plastic bags that pollute the landscape. Take a look around and you'll spot blue, white and beige plastic bags clinging to trees, balled up in the alley or caught in hedges. They are an eyesore and annoyance. But they are also a major environmental and quality-of-life issue.
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