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BUSINESS
By Blair S. Walker | September 10, 1990
The memory is vividly stamped into Frank Adams' brain.He was running his own company and desperately needed his venture capital firm to help him wriggle out of a tight financial situation. At stake was his ability to make payroll, not to mention the existence of his business. Mr. Adams huddled with his financial backers and informed them of how he planned to alleviate his problems, as well as the consequences of not doing so."They were strict, academic types," Mr. Adams said. "To very specific questions, they were giving me dissertations on market theory, oligarchies.
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NEWS
July 1, 1995
An article in the Business section June 28 omitted the name of one of the sponsors of this year's Entrepreneurs of the Year awards in Maryland. Ernst & Young is a national sponsor of the program.The Sun regrets the errors.
NEWS
By Andrew Wainer | December 26, 2013
In the midst of the debate over the largest potential immigration reform legislation in 50 years, American communities struggling with decades of population loss and economic decline are being revitalized by newcomers. The economic contribution of immigrants in high-skilled fields is relatively well-known, but less acknowledged are the contributions that "blue collar" immigrants make in revitalizing depressed communities and economies, both as manual laborers and small business entrepreneurs.
NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | July 24, 2003
In Baltimore County SCORE to offer workshop for fledgling entrepreneurs TOWSON - The Service Corps of Retired Executives will hold a four-session workshop for those considering starting a business or for new entrepreneurs. The sessions will be held from 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. Aug. 13, 14, 20 and 21 at Towson United Methodist Church, 501 Hampton Lane. Topics will include business plans, financing, management, legal issues and marketing. The cost is $75 for the series. Registration is encouraged.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | February 18, 2012
For a disciplined U.S. Naval Academy graduate who helped run nuclear-powered ships, Jason Hardebeck likes to move fast and break things. The 46-year-old entrepreneur, who grew up in Montana and Nevada, came to the East Coast to attend the academy in Annapolis. His career has spanned startups in Boston, Black & Decker in Towson and his own Baltimore-based startup, WhoGlue, which he started at the peak of the dot-com boom over a decade ago. He closed a chapter last fall by selling WhoGlue, an online network for private communities, to Facebook for an undisclosed amount.
BUSINESS
By David Rocks and David Rocks,Special to The Sun | June 20, 1994
PRAGUE, Czech Republic -- Czechs call their capital "Golden Prague" because of the scores of gilded steeples, spires and towers that loom over the city's medieval core. Foreigners coming here in recent years, though, see a different kind of gold along Prague's ancient cobblestone streets."Where there's change, there's opportunity," said Scott Otto, one of thousands of young foreign entrepreneurs to flock to Prague since the "Velvet Revolution" peacefully ended communism here 4 1/2 years ago. "When people hear of a part of the world that is newly opened to capitalism and entrepreneurship, they come."
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,SUN STAFF | August 27, 2003
Before you head off to the beach one last time this Labor Day weekend, pause to consider the Maryland food worker who may be serving your crab cake or pouring your beer. Nearly 200,000 Marylanders -- slightly more than 8 percent of the entire workforce -- are employed in the food business. Their salaries vary, but very few are getting rich in this field. Restaurant and cafeteria workers on average earn a bit less than $17,000 a year; those in food manufactuing earn about $33,000 a year, according to state and federal statistics.
EXPLORE
March 27, 2012
On March 27, TowsonGlobal at Towson University is marking its fifth anniversary and recognized the achievements of six entrepreneurs who have turned ideas into real businesses. During the Celebration of Entrepreneurial Success ceremony at the university, certificates of accomplishment will be awarded to the incubator's first graduates, which include: Linda Seidel and Estelle Meister of Transcending Cosmetics - a company that was founded to market their proprietary product, Natural Cover, to makeup professionals and medical practitioners.
BUSINESS
By Ellen James Martin | October 5, 1991
Entrepreneurs seeking to set up child-care centers in the Baltimore area are among those eligible for below-market-rate loans from NCNB Corp., the bank holding company announced yesterday."
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