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By David Rosenthaland Kim Clark and David Rosenthaland Kim Clark,Sun Staff Correspondents | September 18, 1990
MOSCOW -- As Yuri Tumentsev heads down Gorky Street toward the gritty industrial suburbs, his white Lada never leaves the fast lane -- fitting for the new breed of young, ambitious Soviet entrepreneurs.He's dressed casually, but with a European flair unusual for the Soviet Union: black pants and a black shirt splashed with red, green and gold. He takes a drag on a Marlboro, the coolest cigarette in this nicotine-mad country. "I think I am a Soviet yuppie," he says, smiling.In Zelenograd, Mr. Tumentsev stops at a large state-owned laundry, where his young retail and manufacturing company, ABV, leases two small rooms to make socks.
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NEWS
By LOWELL E. SUNDERLAND | February 2, 2003
TOUGH TIMES, it's been said, foster creative thinking, which is not at all to imply that what follows here is a good idea. What follows is, however, creative. The subject is amateur sports facilities, or lack of them, and it surfaced in a rather unlikely forum last week, during a meeting in the new Ellicott City Senior Center of the Howard County Commission on Aging. The voice that broached the topic, that of West Friendship's Donald Dunn, has been heard many times before, mainly on anything involving golf, Dunn's other passion (in addition to dabbling with Howard County affairs)
BUSINESS
By Jane Applegate and Jane Applegate,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | July 29, 1991
When Betsy Browning was in law school and needed to present evidence, she drew charts and graphs on the back of shirt cardboard with a marking pen. Browning went on to teach media law at the University of Texas at Austin, but never forgot those crude cardboard graphics.Today, Browning combines her legal expertise with the talents of a team of graphic artists at Browning & Co. The Houston-based firm prepares demonstrative evidence for trials and utility rate cases across the country. The charts, graphics and time lines not only help jury members better understand what's being said in court but will also generate about $1 million in revenue this year for Browning's company.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | August 24, 1997
Sharon Dandridge thinks of her taxi service for the elderly as her offspring. She's had to sacrifice for her year-old business and give more than she gets in return.Remembered Pleasures, the single-van business Dandridge hopes will fulfill a need for transportation in Howard County, just breaks even now. And Dandridge still longs for the regular paychecks she received when she drove tractor-trailers.But "I was as far as I could go with that company," Dandridge said. "That's not what I wanted to do for the rest of my life.
NEWS
By Jill Zarend-Kubatko, For The Baltimore Sun | October 12, 2013
Remember those kids from elementary school who were perpetually building thingamajigs with Legos or erector sets? They grew up to be tinkerers and inventors. Unfortunately, some of them discovered it's not exactly practical to keep a small car in the living room, a robot in the kitchen or a bandsaw in the bedroom. So many of them have turned to hackerspaces — like mega basement workshops but with camaraderie and tons of high-tech equipment. Baltimore Hackerspace, a nonprofit in the industrial part of East Baltimore, allows its members an unconventional way of learning, sharing and inventing.
BUSINESS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,SUN STAFF | January 18, 1998
For Brenda Sterling, the keywords for 1998 are "maximize resources."It's a daily challenge developing a year-old, home-based, one-person training and consulting firm on a part-time basis while holding down a full-time job, she said.The solution, she discovered, is to strike up alliances.Joint venturing will be a major trend this year among minority firms looking to penetrate new markets and foster growth, business counselors said.Another will be minority entrepreneurs acquiring companies instead of starting their own, they added.
NEWS
By Newsday | April 16, 1993
MOSCOW -- Russian business leaders mocked President Boris Yeltsin today when he told them inflation has fallen steadily since the start of the year.Many of the 4,000 delegates to a meeting of the Russian Union of Industrialists and Entrepreneurs laughed out loud when Mr. Yeltsin said monthly inflation had sunk from 27 percent in January to 17 percent in March."
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,SUN REPORTER | December 13, 2007
Kris Appel stood before investors this week and delivered a seven-minute pitch on the market viability of an exercise device that helps stroke survivors regain their arm movement. The presentation at a biosciences conference in Baltimore was Appel's latest effort to raise money for her startup company, which grew out of a program that trains and helps women start technology-based businesses. Called ACTiVATE, the backbone of the program gives women access to technology and research created by the region's laboratories and universities with a goal of commercializing such homegrown innovations.
SPORTS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,andrea.walker@baltsun.com | May 17, 2009
Devon Ford, 13, counts on the Preakness every year to earn a little extra cash toting people's coolers in a shopping cart from their cars to the gates of Pimlico Race Course. But this year business wasn't so good. He and three friends were barely making any money. Since Pimlico banned people from bringing their own beer and liquor, very few people used coolers. Those who did brought smaller, lighter coolers filled with food instead of heavy bottles and cans. "It used to be packed with people, but there aren't that many people this year," said Carter, who lives a few blocks from Pimlico.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | August 20, 2001
Paul Bade thought he could just "make a go of it" with his company, Dot21 Real-Time Systems, in Howard County's NeoTech incubator. He was going to develop the technology, make a product, shop it to the customers he already knew, and everyone - customers and employees - would live happily ever after. Yeah, right. "We had cash-flow issues and stuff we really weren't aware of" in the beginning, said Bade, the company's vice president. "Employees want to be paid right away. You bill people and they don't want to pay you right away.
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