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NEWS
September 9, 2012
Your recent editorial ("We built that," Sept. 3) clearly shows that along with President Barack Obama you do not understand America's entrepreneurial history - the engine which is the basis of the great and unprecedented economic and social progress and achievements of the United States. Of course, only government can provide the infrastructure for a functioning society - roads, bridges, levees, educational systems and all the other services that are the basic functions of government and serve all of the people.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
By Arthur Hirsch and The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2014
J.J. Reidy boarded a garish yellow RV parked in Harbor East and shared a vision: vast greenhouses in Baltimore raising produce to feed thousands, the plants feeding on nutrients from the waste of fish swimming in nearby tanks. In two minutes and 35 seconds of video time, the graduate business student and would-be entrepreneur delivered the pitch he fashioned with his business partner, Julie Buisson, wrapping it up with a punchy closing line: "We believe we can feed our city in our city.
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NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | February 12, 2011
An app that maps crimes in a neighborhood and a system that provides text alerts when you get a parking ticket were just some of the ideas inspired by an informal tech entrepreneurial get-together held Saturday in response to the city's OpenBaltimore data initiative. The group of about 30, MacBook Pros in tow, met at "Civic Hack Day" at the Emerging Technology Center in Canton to collaborate and discuss the various web application projects. Many included ways to find uses for data released for the first time by the city last month.
BUSINESS
By Arthur Hirsch and The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2014
How much do you know about the week's new events? Or the geography of the Middle East? Or Batman movies? Coleman Anderson and his partner, Andrew Schuster, are betting a few hundred thousand of their investors' dollars that whatever you know, you'll want to test yourself, and that you're willing to spend time in the pursuit on their new website: Newsup. "The goal really is to make news a more meaningful experience for folks," especially young people, said Anderson, the chief marketing officer, who is 29. The site — http://www.newsup.me — presents news about national and world events, entertainment and sports in the form of an array of brief quizzes on a particular topic.
NEWS
October 11, 2011
I am in agreement with the view expressed in your tribute to Steve Jobs that many CEOs of the largest corporations are overpaid for what they do ("Steve Jobs, old-fashioned visionary," Oct. 9). They are not innovators and they are not personal risk takers. Steve Jobs was not a typical CEO because he was an entrepreneur and the founder of his company despite the fact that he was "fired" and had a hiatus from the company for 12 years. You note that "while he became a rich man, he did not appear to be motivated by money.
NEWS
By Brent Jones | February 5, 2010
Kenneth McCullough got the itch to buy a snowplow months ago, acting on a hunch that this winter would be a nasty one. Money, McCullough anticipated, would be there to be made. Turns out McCullough's gut was right. He is prepping for this weekend's snow as if he is a participant in Sunday's Super Bowl. "I'm going to get a good eight hours' sleep, then get up at 5 a.m. [Saturday] and get started," said McCullough, 39, who lives in Reisterstown and plans to canvass Baltimore County for jobs.
EXPLORE
By Lisa Kawata | November 2, 2011
Entrepreneurs, both established and wanna-be's, have a new place to connect on the web. Live Your Dream TV offers tips, techniques and hopefully a whole lot of inspiration to entrepreneurs needing help or just wanting to spread the word about their services. The daily webcasts were started in January by Columbia couple Mick and Tara Carbo. Their own entrepreneurial story is inspirational and still a work in progress. While they walk that hopeful road to success, the Hammond High School alums are committed to doing what they can to help others live their dream as well.
BUSINESS
By Arthur Hirsch and The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2014
J.J. Reidy boarded a garish yellow RV parked in Harbor East and shared a vision: vast greenhouses in Baltimore raising produce to feed thousands, the plants feeding on nutrients from the waste of fish swimming in nearby tanks. In two minutes and 35 seconds of video time, the graduate business student and would-be entrepreneur delivered the pitch he fashioned with his business partner, Julie Buisson, wrapping it up with a punchy closing line: "We believe we can feed our city in our city.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | April 14, 2012
Could crowdfunding work for entrepreneurs who need capital for their private startup and are willing to sell a stake in it to the masses? Congress seems to think so. Charities and artists successfully raise money for their causes via crowdfunding, a method of soliciting hundreds or thousands of small donations over the Internet. Could it work for entrepreneurs who need capital for their startup and are willing to sell a stake in it to the masses? Congress seems to think so. The bipartisan Jumpstart Our Business Startups — or JOBS — Act loosens restrictions so business can more easily raise capital and, it's hoped, create jobs.
BUSINESS
By Kevin L. McQuaid and Kevin L. McQuaid,Sun Staff Writer | January 14, 1995
Look beyond the dark wood, piped in classical music and ornate furniture of Frank A. Adams' Timonium office, and the true essence of Grotech Capital Group Inc.'s president and chief executive emerges.In one corner of an end table, for instance, sits a small block inscribed with a paraphrase of Winston Churchill's famous "Never give in" speech. Tucked behind a door is a plaque extolling the philosophy of Vince Lombardi, entitled "What it takes to be No. 1.""Working hard and not giving up have helped me in my life, and they're very much characteristics of Grotech at large," said Mr. Adams, a former PHH Corp.
BUSINESS
By Danae King, The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2014
When Lisa Harris Jones launched her law firm 14 years ago, she used the only money she saw as an option - her own. Harris Jones said she founded Harris Jones & Malone with $7,000 on the belief that "if I can't buy it flat out, then I don't need it. " It has grown into a lobbying firm that takes in millions of dollars a year. "There's nothing in this office that's on credit," said Harris Jones of the Charles Village firm. Harris Jones isn't alone in the way she funded her business; many female entrepreneurs never seek capital from others.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | June 28, 2014
Whenever Baltimore-area companies sell themselves to out-of-state firms, economists and local leaders alike bemoan the loss. Another headquarters gone. Fewer corporate decision-makers here. Possible job cuts. But Silicon Valley's deals for two Columbia firms - the planned Micros Systems acquisition, announced last week, and Sourcefire last year - strike local entrepreneurs in an entirely different way. They want more California tech giants doing business here, more billion-dollar-plus acquisitions.
NEWS
By Melanie Balakit, Capital News Service | March 24, 2014
Annapolis businessman David Purdy started smoking when he was 15. He tried nicotine patches to kick the addiction. Later, he tried Nicorette gum. Neither worked. Then a neighbor, also a heavy smoker, introduced him to an e-cigarette, a battery-operated device that mimics smoking a traditional cigarette. Unlike a tobacco cigarette, it emits vapor, not smoke. Purdy, then 47, gave it a try. "Within a month, I started feeling the health benefits of it," Purdy said. "I started tasting food again much better, started breathing much better.
FEATURES
By Sloane Brown, For The Baltimore Sun | March 7, 2014
Editor's note: Take 10 is a series of occasional features on prominent local residents and the possessions they treasure. Greg Cangialosi's personal hashtag is #neverstop. It may not have been created by the 40-year-old Baltimore techie, but it's one he's used for years. "That pretty much describes the way I live my life," says the co-founder of several high profile Baltimore-based internet ventures. That phrase certainly describes his professional life. These days Cangialosi is juggling three - yes, three - jobs, none of which he had necessarily to do after 2011, when he sold Blue Sky Factory - a 10-year-old successful email marketing company he co-founded - to WhatCounts for an undisclosed sum. Just over a year ago, Cangialosi and two partners launched Betamore, a Federal Hill campus that helps incubate tech-based startup companies and offers an academy to teach a number of technical skills.
NEWS
January 24, 2014
More and more taxes are taking a toll on businesses and citizens. Baltimore's proposed 10-cent tax on plastic bags is not sound government policy ( "Shoppers in city may see 10-cent bag fee," Jan. 21). We should encourage people to clean up litter, as they are the ones creating this problem. Baltimore should do what other jurisdictions across the country have done to reduce litter: Empower people as entrepreneurs by having a 10-cent redemption on bottles and paper products. This would help the homeless become green entrepreneurs where they can turn trash into cash.
NEWS
By Andrew Wainer | December 26, 2013
In the midst of the debate over the largest potential immigration reform legislation in 50 years, American communities struggling with decades of population loss and economic decline are being revitalized by newcomers. The economic contribution of immigrants in high-skilled fields is relatively well-known, but less acknowledged are the contributions that "blue collar" immigrants make in revitalizing depressed communities and economies, both as manual laborers and small business entrepreneurs.
NEWS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | April 17, 2011
One mobile application lets people know the ratio of single people to married people at a bar or restaurant. One website lets owners of vacant buildings poll the crowd to see what kind of business should move into the neighborhood. Another app lets teachers use Facebook as a tool. These are a handful of apps that came to life in Baltimore during the city's first Startup Weekend. More than 125 people descended on Baltimore from as far away as New York City for the chance to rapidly develop their ideas into prototypes, in hopes of becoming the next Facebook or Google.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | October 28, 2013
 With Amazon founder Jeff Bezos buying the Washington Post and eBay founder Pierre Omidyar putting up $250 milllion for a project featuring journalist Glenn Greenwald, it is starting to feel as tech billionaires might be just the folks to save journalism. But what kind of owners will they be? That's one of the questions discussed on Howard Kurtz's "Media Buzz" show Sunday on Fox News. Here's video (below) of Kurtz, me and Farhad Manjoo, tech columnist for the Wall Street Journal, talking about the roles tech money and expertise could play in the future of journalism.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | December 8, 2013
Few companies watch their bottom line with more anxiety than startup firms, but the ones who want to move into a new business accelerator in Columbia will need to think beyond revenue and expenses. Howard County's Conscious Venture Lab is on the hunt for fledgling companies practicing a form of what's often called responsible or sustainable capitalism - businesses with aims that include but aren't limited to profits. The accelerator's organizers want firms that consider not just shareholders in their decisions but also a broad range of other "stakeholders" such as employees, suppliers and the environment.
NEWS
By Amanda Yeager, ayeager@tribune.com | December 6, 2013
The objects displayed on a shelf in the depths of UAV Solutions' headquarters in Jessup might look like toys, out of context. To the untrained eye, the plastic doodads - some thick, some thin, some glossy, others matte, and in a variety of subdued colors, like black, brown, tan and white - could be sandcastle molds, toy submarines - maybe DEVO hats in conservative hues. The reality is much more practical: They're parts of engines, circuit boards, radios. And each was printed by one of the company's 3D printers.
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