Advertisement
HomeCollectionsEntrapment
IN THE NEWS

Entrapment

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | December 9, 2010
The tactics used by federal agents to befriend a young man professing jihadist sentiments — and to help him plot an attack on a military recruiting center in Catonsville — are becoming more common nationwide. But even as such cases raise questions about entrapment, legal experts say most defendants have a hard time convincing juries that they were unfairly targeted. "Entrapment is a very difficult defense," University of Maryland law professor Michael Milleman said, a day after 21-year-old Antonio Martinez was accused of plotting to blow up the Armed Forces Career Center on Baltimore National Pike.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | July 27, 2013
The robbery would be simple, the five men were told: The crew would burst into a Baltimore hotel room and grab $400,000 worth of cocaine stashed there by an out-of-town supplier. They should bring guns, just in case. But as the men headed to the hotel, Baltimore police working with the Drug Enforcement Agency swooped in to arrest them. The entire story — the coke, the supplier and the hotel room — had been made up by law enforcement. The suspects in the supposed December robbery were charged with conspiracy to distribute drugs, robbery and gun violations.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Debbie M. Price and Thomas W. Waldron and Debbie M. Price and Thomas W. Waldron,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer William F. Zorzi Jr. and researcher Andrea Wilson contributed to this article | June 15, 1997
The government says it has your client on tape, soliciting two murders for hire. They find an assault weapon in her bedroom and the makings of a silencer in her car. They watch her leave $500 in an envelope at a hotel desk. She is wearing a disguise.With this set of accusations, what are Ruthann Aron's lawyers to do?Legal experts say the circumstances of Aron's attempted murder-for-hire case make the obvious avenues of defense -- insanity and entrapment -- challenging, at best.But Aron, a former U.S. Senate candidate, has one important advantage -- money.
EXPLORE
June 14, 2011
Editor: I am responding to the news of yet another drowning in Deer Creek. Many such deaths can be avoided by an awareness of how they occur and of what to do. A person standing on rocks in moving water that is only as high as their knees can easily lose their balance and as their foot slips it can wedge into a crevice in the rocks. The enormous power of the moving water will push them down and hold them down, resulting in a drowning death. To avoid foot entrapment, one can fall backwards into an imaginary inner tube, drawing up the knees and feet out of harms way. Then the hands and arms swing the feet downstream to meet obstacles, protecting the head.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,Sun Film Critic | April 30, 1999
Pretentiousness and preposterousness are an uneasy mix, or at least an unentertaining one, which "Entrapment" goes to great lengths to prove.The pretense is obvious from the very first shot, when an annoyingly self-important computer readout appears on screen: "New York -- 16 Days to Millennium." The conceit will reappear throughout "Entrapment," which feverishly tries to instill viewers with high Y2K anxiety, even as it piles one absurdity upon another.Just when "Entrapment" looks like the movie that "Mission: Impossible" so desperately wanted to be, it self-destructs with a discordant piece of witlessness.
NEWS
May 1, 1995
The Lineboro Volunteer Fire Department recently purchased the "jaws of life" rescue tool for $12,000. The ladies auxiliary of the department contributed $5,000.Firefighters have been attending training sessions for the past few weeks to learn to use the tool.The department answers a lot of calls in York County, Pa., many of which involve entrapment rescues, said John Krebs, fire chief.
FEATURES
By Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe and Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe,Contributing Writers | March 31, 1992
Q: My friends have removed a pane of glass from their French door so their cat can come and go. I'm worried that their toddler will get stuck trying to crawl through. Is this a hazard for the child?A: You highlight an important danger for children of which parents may not be aware. The natural curiosity of children may lead them into places where they shouldn't go. We call these places "entrapment hazards." A house with children shouldn't have them.Some of the most tragic instances of entrapment happen when the openings in a guardrail allow a child's body to slip through, but the relatively large head can't pass, and the child hangs, sometimes fatally.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau of The Sun | April 23, 1991
WASHINGTON -- After years of refusing to get involved in legal disputes over undercover "sting" operations by police and federal agents, the Supreme Court agreed yesterday to consider putting new curbs on the law enforcement technique.A Nebraska farmer, convicted of buying a child pornography magazine through the mail, has urged the court to rule that it is illegal for officers to conduct a "sting" operation if they have no basis for believing that the person they target is likely to commit a crime.
EXPLORE
June 14, 2011
Editor: I am responding to the news of yet another drowning in Deer Creek. Many such deaths can be avoided by an awareness of how they occur and of what to do. A person standing on rocks in moving water that is only as high as their knees can easily lose their balance and as their foot slips it can wedge into a crevice in the rocks. The enormous power of the moving water will push them down and hold them down, resulting in a drowning death. To avoid foot entrapment, one can fall backwards into an imaginary inner tube, drawing up the knees and feet out of harms way. Then the hands and arms swing the feet downstream to meet obstacles, protecting the head.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | June 30, 1993
NEW YORK -- Plotters who planned to blow up the United Nations and other prominent targets also discussed exploding a powerful bomb in midtown Manhattan's crowded diamond district to inflict heavy casualties on Jewish businessmen, federal prosecutors have charged.Government lawyers said the scheme was revealed when some of the alleged terrorists were secretly tape recorded in a car as they scouted potential targets."One of the co-conspirators says, 'This is the heart of Israel here in Manhattan," Assistant U.S. Attorney Lev L. Dassin told a U.S. magistrate yesterday.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | December 14, 2010
Antonio Martinez was "grinning from ear to ear" on the day he expected to kill U.S. soldiers with a car bomb, and he fantasized about martyrdom well before he converted to Islam and began plotting the attack last year, a prosecutor said Monday. His lawyer, meanwhile, contended that the alleged jihadist plot to bomb a military recruitment center in Catonsville was concocted purely by federal agents, who "induced" the Woodlawn man to participate in what amounted to a clear case of entrapment.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | December 9, 2010
The tactics used by federal agents to befriend a young man professing jihadist sentiments — and to help him plot an attack on a military recruiting center in Catonsville — are becoming more common nationwide. But even as such cases raise questions about entrapment, legal experts say most defendants have a hard time convincing juries that they were unfairly targeted. "Entrapment is a very difficult defense," University of Maryland law professor Michael Milleman said, a day after 21-year-old Antonio Martinez was accused of plotting to blow up the Armed Forces Career Center on Baltimore National Pike.
NEWS
By SOUTH FLORIDA SUN-SENTINEL | June 24, 2006
The seven Miami-area men accused of domestic terrorism may have been long on ambition, according to the indictments, but apparently they were far short on substance, according to neighbors and relatives. A federal indictment unsealed yesterday said seven young men arrested for allegedly attempting to establish an al-Qaida terrorist cell harbored dreams of forming an "Islamic Army" to unleash a "full ground war" against targets in the United States. But the plot didn't get far. The men acquired combat boots, photographed targets and recited a loyalty pledge to al-Qaida - then told a government informant their organization was having "various problems."
NEWS
By Thomas Sowell | August 21, 2001
STANFORD, Calif. - The U.S. Department of Education and the National Institutes of Health have launched a campaign to get a government program created to "identify" children with autism at age 2 and then subject them to "intensive" early intervention for 25 hours a week or more. It sounds good, but so have so many other government programs that created more problems than they solved. Just who is to "identify" these children and by what criteria? A legal case in Nebraska shows the dangers in creating a government-mandated dragnet that can subject all sorts of children to hours of disagreeable, ineffective or even counterproductive treatment for something they do not have.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | September 24, 2000
A renewed campaign by Baltimore police to pose as drug dealers and round up addicts is being met with skepticism by prosecutors who, fearing claims of entrapment, are reluctant to take most cases to court. Few of the more than 300 people arrested since June have been convicted. Most of their cases have been thrown out before trial - the only jail time being the hours spent waiting for an initial bail hearing. "I would like to see more being prosecuted than are being prosecuted now," said city Police Commissioner Edward T. Norris.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,Sun Film Critic | April 30, 1999
Pretentiousness and preposterousness are an uneasy mix, or at least an unentertaining one, which "Entrapment" goes to great lengths to prove.The pretense is obvious from the very first shot, when an annoyingly self-important computer readout appears on screen: "New York -- 16 Days to Millennium." The conceit will reappear throughout "Entrapment," which feverishly tries to instill viewers with high Y2K anxiety, even as it piles one absurdity upon another.Just when "Entrapment" looks like the movie that "Mission: Impossible" so desperately wanted to be, it self-destructs with a discordant piece of witlessness.
NEWS
By William Safire | November 3, 1992
ARE you ready for the first pre-post-mortem of the '92 election? Here are some of the late hits and last-minute maneuvers that we can do without next time around.1. Polling switches. The Gallup organization crossed the line from reporting to manipulating when it suddenly changed its methodology in the campaign's final week. Overnight, "likely voters" rather than "registered voters" became the basis for the closely watched percentages, instantly changing a six-point differential to a two-point gap.If the Gallup organization, polling for CNN and USA Today, turns out to be right, other pollsters will henceforth weight their results on similar guesstimates of degrees of likelihood of respondents' actually voting.
NEWS
By SOUTH FLORIDA SUN-SENTINEL | June 24, 2006
The seven Miami-area men accused of domestic terrorism may have been long on ambition, according to the indictments, but apparently they were far short on substance, according to neighbors and relatives. A federal indictment unsealed yesterday said seven young men arrested for allegedly attempting to establish an al-Qaida terrorist cell harbored dreams of forming an "Islamic Army" to unleash a "full ground war" against targets in the United States. But the plot didn't get far. The men acquired combat boots, photographed targets and recited a loyalty pledge to al-Qaida - then told a government informant their organization was having "various problems."
NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Marcia Myers,SUN STAFF | July 10, 1998
The man who informed police about Ruthann Aron's alleged murder-for-hire scheme and helped them tape her making the plans, insisted yesterday that Aron had not been coaxed into her actions.On a June evening last year, when she spoke to him about her feelings of vengeance and asked him to help find someone to "eliminate" two then-unidentified people, William H. Mossburg Jr. said he was frightened."At some point I'm telling her this doesn't make sense," Mossburg testified yesterday in Montgomery County Circuit Court.
NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Marcia Myers,SUN STAFF | July 9, 1998
Defense lawyers characterized Ruthann Aron yesterday as a woman with an "eggshell-thin veneer of toughness" that concealed serious mental illness, someone who needed professional help but who instead was entrapped by police when they learned of her alleged murder-for-hire scheme.The entrapment issue marks a new strategy in the Aron case, which is being tried for the second time in Montgomery County Circuit Court in Rockville.Lawyer Harry Trainor Jr. said the tape recordings of his client's conversations with a detective she believed to be a hit man and their go-between showed that Aron was goaded and pushed into the plan that targeted her husband, Dr. Barry Aron, and another man.Ruthann Aron, a well-known Montgomery County developer and former U.S. Senate candidate, was too prominent a figure for police to do otherwise, Trainor said.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.