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ENTERTAINMENT
By MIKE HIMOWITZ | May 9, 2002
BY VIRTUE OF his father's occupation, my son Ike has lived most of his life in a house filled with computers and other electronic gadgets. As a result, he's hard to impress. But a sleek silver box called the ReplayTV 4000 has his unmitigated admiration these days. Hooked up to a cable outlet, an Internet router and a TV in our basement, it provides a revolutionary television viewing experience. "Amazing!" Ike said as he stopped by the office one night. "I just watched an entire hour of Star Trek in 38 minutes."
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NEWS
February 5, 2013
Regarding Michael Hill's recent column on sports cheating, despite his Shakespearian rhetoric, no quarter should be granted to Lance Armstrong, who for over a decade willfully and systematically lied, cheated and thumbed his nose at ethical behavior ("Fans crave what cheating provides," Jan. 25). Unfortunately, Mr. Hill's column promulgates the message of our country's increasingly influential sports and entertainment industry, which suggests that the primary role for the masses is to watch and be entertained by a small troop of elite athletes.
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NEWS
By Shaun Borsh | November 2, 2003
AS AMERICANS, we do not censor. But as parents, we should. Why should our children endure the fast-paced, sexually overt, dancing bellybuttons of today's pop culture? Should an art form presented to children include images of violence against women? Why promote the oxymoronic notion of the empowered video babe? How do we counter, for our daughters, the seductress figure who chants about a jerky boy treating her badly? The entertainment industry has occasionally acquiesced to moral concern.
NEWS
By Douglas MacKinnon | July 27, 2011
I just want to write. Ultimately, I just want my efforts to stand or fall on their own merits. A recent story in The Hollywood Reporter entitled "TV executives admit in taped interviews that Hollywood pushes a liberal agenda," reminded me all over again how difficult it has been to meet that simple and fair standard. I am in fact a former Republican who now labels myself an independent conservative. Beyond that, I've been a fairly successful author and novelist and have sold tens of thousands of books.
NEWS
September 30, 2000
THEY SOUND like the tobacco peddlers, don't they? Some Hollywood studio executives are actually justifying the way they market R-rated movies to kids as young as 9 because, in their opinion, some adult-rated movies may be of benefit to younger children. Yeah, right. And Joe Camel wasn't a shameless attempt to boost child smoking. These guys need to stop reading their marketing departments' science fiction and take a look at reality: People are tired of competitive zeal trumping common sense in the entertainment industry.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Sun Staff Writer | August 1, 1995
Mickey became The Mouse That Roared yesterday as the Walt Disney Co. said it would acquire Capital Cities/ABC Inc., parent company of the nation's No. 1-rated television network, in the largest merger ever in the entertainment industry.If the $19 billion deal is approved by shareholders and passes regulatory scrutiny, it would be the second-largest corporate acquisition ever. Only the $25 billion purchase of RJR Nabisco Inc. by Kohlberg Kravis Roberts & Co. in 1989 was larger.The agreement would create an international colossus with interests in news, entertainment production, broadcasting, cable TV programming, sports teams, newspapers, theme parks and other ventures.
NEWS
By Jonathan Weisman and Jonathan Weisman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 15, 1999
WASHINGTON -- In a hilltop Beverly Hills mansion tonight, under the long shadow of Littleton, Colo., President Clinton will rub shoulders and reach deeply into the pockets of Hollywood's elite, disregarding Republican accusations that the Democratic Party has become too cozy with the entertainment industry to condemn the violent content of its products.The fund-raiser -- sponsored by film director Steven Spielberg, producer Jeffrey Katzenberg and recording mogul David Geffen -- is expected to raise nearly $2 million for the Democrats.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin Washington and Kevin Washington,SUN STAFF | September 12, 2002
Planning to rip and burn a few tunes from Britney Spears' new CD to back up your favorite tracks? Hoping to hunt up a recording of that hot polka you heard years ago through the KaZaA network? Thinking digital television will broadcast episodes of ER that you'll be able to share with friends over the Internet? Think again. The entertainment industry is waging an unprecedented legal, political and technical campaign to lock up its music, movies and software in the digital realm. Congress is already pondering industry legislation that would allow copyright holders to launch computer attacks on peer-to-peer file-sharing networks.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dan Gillmor and Dan Gillmor,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | November 5, 2001
The entertainment industry has been working for years to establish control over digital content to prevent unauthorized copying. The latest effort, a proposed bill by Sen. Ernest "Fritz" Hollings, a South Carolina Democrat, would force makers of interactive digital devices to build copy protection into everything they make. There hasn't been much publicity about the Security Systems Standards and Certification Act (SSSCA), but this is a real piece of work. It's a follow-up to the 1998 Digital Millennium Copyright Act, which grossly altered the balance between users and owners of copyrighted materials in favor of the owners.
SPORTS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | October 16, 2007
Washington -- At universities with big-time football and basketball programs, professors know better than to step in front of the freight train of commercialized sports, a law school dean told the Knight Commission on Intercollegiate Athletics yesterday. "They know they're going to get run over" if they try to push athletic reforms, said Gary Roberts, dean of the Indiana University School of Law and a former faculty athletics representative at Tulane. "So why bother? "At the end of the day, this is the entertainment industry and not the education business, and the faculty doesn't have much to say about it," Roberts declared at a Faculty Summit on Intercollegiate Athletics.
SPORTS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | October 16, 2007
Washington -- At universities with big-time football and basketball programs, professors know better than to step in front of the freight train of commercialized sports, a law school dean told the Knight Commission on Intercollegiate Athletics yesterday. "They know they're going to get run over" if they try to push athletic reforms, said Gary Roberts, dean of the Indiana University School of Law and a former faculty athletics representative at Tulane. "So why bother? "At the end of the day, this is the entertainment industry and not the education business, and the faculty doesn't have much to say about it," Roberts declared at a Faculty Summit on Intercollegiate Athletics.
FEATURES
By James Bates and James Bates,Los Angeles Times | April 27, 2007
Jack Valenti, the urbane Washington lobbyist who served as Hollywood's public face for nearly four decades and was best known for creating the film rating system, died yesterday afternoon at age 85, according to Warren Cowan, his longtime friend and publicist for the MPAA. Mr. Valenti had been in ill health since suffering a stroke in March. He was treated for several weeks at the Johns Hopkins Hospital but was released Tuesday and returned to his home in Washington, where he died. For 38 years until retiring in 2004, Mr. Valenti headed the Motion Picture Association of America, guiding the trade organization from a clubby group of movie studios led by autocratic moguls into a collection of global media conglomerates involved in television, the Internet and an array of other media businesses.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | January 6, 2007
The 800-pound gorilla is back, and as usual folks are pretending the critter ain't in the room. We'll call this particular 800-pound gorilla Joey, in tribute to that 1940s film about the giant ape called Mighty Joe Young. I think it's time Joey got his props. I think it's time we acknowledge Joey. Joey, meet the guys. Guys, shake hands with Joey. "The guys" in this case are those Baltimoreans who, for the past week, have expressed angst and dismay about the appalling way some young black men in this city, addicted to the thug life, dispatch each other with such chilling ease.
NEWS
By Jon Healey and David G. Savage and Jon Healey and David G. Savage,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 28, 2005
WASHINGTON - The Supreme Court gave the entertainment industry a new legal weapon against Internet piracy, deciding yesterday that companies that actively encourage people to download free copies of music or movies can be held liable for their users' illegal acts. The unanimous decision sets a new standard for distinguishing legitimate innovators from those who deliberately profit from online bootlegging. And it marks the first big copyright decision of the Internet era. But its actual impact on Internet piracy will be limited, some analysts said, because large online sources of illegal music and movies will remain unscathed.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dean Takahashi and Dean Takahashi,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | November 18, 2004
When Hewlett-Packard Chief Executive Carly Fiorina strolled the red carpet with DreamWorks SKG founder Jeffrey Katzenberg at the Academy Awards this spring, her turn in the limelight was more about gigabytes than glamour. Hollywood studios like DreamWorks have become coveted customers for HP and its rivals as the shift to digital animation demands sophisticated computing know-how. Fiorina wants to make sure that HP - and not competitors such as IBM and Sun Microsystems - is the heir to one-time digital effects powerhouse Silicon Graphics.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | February 19, 2004
Pornography is going mobile. That means the increased possibility of erotic, adult content anytime, anywhere. The $10 billion adult entertainment industry has all but conquered the world of magazines, home movies and the Internet. Now, telecommunications experts say it's coming soon to a wireless phone near you. Already popular in Asia and Europe, wireless adult content could generate $1 billion to $6.5 billion in revenue within the next few years, say experts who predict that it will soon invade the U.S. market, as new technology hitting the States makes it possible for people to swap pictures, browse the Web, instant message and stream video all on one phone.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | August 16, 2000
WASHINGTON - Sen. Joseph I. Lieberman has called some network television programming "garbage." He has urged Hollywood studio chiefs to clean up the industry's "increasingly toxic culture of violence and vulgarity." And he has warned that such a culture may be "a threat to the well-being of kids and society." Even so, as Al Gore's nearly anointed running mate steps to the podium tonight to address a convention awash in Hollywood celebrities and film studio money, the Connecticut Democrat is expected to be hailed and embraced like, well, like a movie star at a glittery premiere.
BUSINESS
By Victor F. Zonana and Leslie Helm and Victor F. Zonana and Leslie Helm,Los Angeles Times | October 30, 1991
NEW YORK -- Time Warner Inc. -- moving to lighten its enormous debt load and improve its access to overseas markets -- agreed yesterday to sell a 12.5 percent stake in its historic Warner Bros. studio and its cable television operations, including HBO, to two Japanese companies for $1 billion.The agreement with electronics-maker Toshiba Corp. and trading giant C. Itoh & Co. Ltd. is a big step toward fulfilling Time Warner Chairman Steven J. Ross' vision of a global, vertically integrated, entertainment industry powerhouse, analysts said.
NEWS
By Shaun Borsh | November 2, 2003
AS AMERICANS, we do not censor. But as parents, we should. Why should our children endure the fast-paced, sexually overt, dancing bellybuttons of today's pop culture? Should an art form presented to children include images of violence against women? Why promote the oxymoronic notion of the empowered video babe? How do we counter, for our daughters, the seductress figure who chants about a jerky boy treating her badly? The entertainment industry has occasionally acquiesced to moral concern.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | October 8, 2003
First lady Kendel S. Ehrlich says she "inadvertently" quipped during a speech that she would like to shoot pop diva Britney Spears, but is standing by her sentiment that the navel-baring temptress is a poor role model for children. Ehrlich singled out Spears during remarks Friday at a conference on preventing domestic violence sponsored by the Frederick County state's attorney's office. In her speech, Ehrlich said that some domestic violence could be prevented if women were able to shake their dependence on abusive men and were better prepared to care for themselves and their children on their own. The entertainment industry, she said, does a poor job of portraying women as independent figures.
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