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Enterprise Zones

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NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | January 24, 2013
The O'Malley administration kicked off an effort to bring medical services to disadvantaged neighborhoods Thursday by designating the state's first five "health enterprise zones" created under a law passed last year. Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown, who led the administration's efforts to launch the $4 million-a-year pilot project, said the five zones will be located in West Baltimore, Annapolis, Capitol Heights (Prince George's County), Greater Lexington Park (St. Mary's County) and Dorchester-Caroline counties.
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NEWS
September 1, 2013
Much of the landmark Inner Harbor developments are in the neighborhood of three decades old (Harborplace turned 30 officially in 2010), which lands them somewhere short of historic. Unfortunately, the project's genesis is fading even as many of the pioneers behind it, from James Rouse to William Donald Schaefer, have exited the stage, too. How many remember what the Inner Harbor looked like before there were shops, an aquarium and other tourism attractions? A half-century ago it was rotting warehouses and piers.
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BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | January 17, 2013
Tax-break Enterprise Zones in Baltimore and the Eastern Shore will expand after getting an OK from Maryland's economic development agency, the state said Thursday. The city's zone was altered to include Harbor Point and nearby portions of South Central Avenue and South Eden Street "to further encourage the economic development of the Harbor East community," the state Department of Business and Economic Development said in a statement. Harbor Point and the nearby streets had been removed from the zone last year as part of a broad reduction in the eligible area.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Jamie Smith Hopkins and By Scott Calvert and Jamie Smith Hopkins | August 26, 2013
Close to 300 commercial properties in Baltimore are getting a property tax break this year thanks to the city's Enterprise Zone program, which has a stated purpose of attracting development and jobs to poorer areas. But while the benefits were spread among 80 city neighborhoods, most parts of town didn't see big breaks, according to a Baltimore Sun analysis of city tax records. In almost half the neighborhoods, the tax break for all owners - collectively - didn't hit $10,000.
NEWS
March 7, 2012
Stuart Butler's op-ed ("An enterprising approach to health," Feb. 29) on what our proposed Health Enterprise Zones (HEZs) can learn from urban "economic" enterprise zones is a valuable critique. His focus on incentives, innovation and community partnerships echoes the strengths of our legislation, the Maryland Health Improvement and Disparities Reduction Act. Like economic enterprise zones, we intend to blanket a distressed community with incentives that draw in the expert people and quality services needed to address a specific problem: health disparities among underserved communities.
NEWS
May 11, 1993
Enterprise zones mean different things to different people. The Clinton administration has now weighed in with its version. It is not dramatically different from its predecessors but it has promise of better things to come -- maybe.Essentially, enterprise zones are an attempt to give depressed neighborhoods or regions an economic shot in the arm. By attracting business investment through tax breaks or other incentives, jobs would be created and blight eradicated. It's a neat theory, much beloved by conservatives.
BUSINESS
July 11, 1997
Hoping to keep and attract jobs in Maryland's targeted growth areas, Gov. Parris N. Glendening has expanded enterprise zones in Baltimore City and in Baltimore and Harford counties by 1,000 acres.State enterprise zones -- areas in which companies can get credits on property and employment taxes -- were expanded yesterday to include Cherry Hill and Westport in the city, the Bethlehem Steel Shipyard in Dundalk, the Lockheed Martin plant in Middle River and the planned Rite Aid regional distribution center in Perryman.
NEWS
By Sherrie Ruhl and Sherrie Ruhl,Sun Staff Writer | June 14, 1995
Edgewood has been named one of four new enterprise zones in Maryland, a designation that will mean tax breaks for businesses relocating, expanding or renovating in the eastern Harford County community.It also means that businesses in the zone, which stretches along the U.S. 40 corridor from Joppatowne on the Harford-Baltimore County line to Route 755, will receive up to $3,000 for each person they hire who is unemployed or underemployed, according to the Marilyn Corbett, a spokeswoman for the Maryland Department of Economic and Employment Development.
NEWS
By TRB | May 7, 1992
Washington. -- "Now where did I put that urban policy? I know I've got one around here somewhere.''George Bush isn't the only one in Washington desperately searching for something practical to suggest in response to the Los Angeles riots. Thus the sudden interest in ''enterprise zones.''Jack Kemp, now Secretary of Housing and Urban Development, has been pushing enterprise zones since he was a pup of a congressman. He is rightly praised as the one member of the Bush administration who has shown he really cares about the tragedy of the underclass.
NEWS
By NEAL R. PEIRCE | June 29, 1992
The Bush-Kemp enterprise-zone bill -- the administration's all-purpose cure for ailing inner cities -- is too much too late.Neal R. Peirce writes a column on state and urban affairs.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | August 24, 2013
In 1982, Mayor William Donald Schaefer persuaded state lawmakers to try a different approach to urban revitalization. To lure companies to poorer parts of Baltimore and elsewhere in Maryland, the government would dangle a 10-year property tax discount and hiring rebates. Baltimore's first so-called Enterprise Zone was carved from a depressed section of Lower Park Heights called Park Circle, where a sausage plant and other businesses opened their doors. Thirty years later, Baltimore has greatly expanded its program, offering multimillion-dollar tax breaks to developers in many of the city's most desirable neighborhoods.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2013
At a packed City Council hearing Wednesday, residents of Perkins Homes public housing, area clergymen and other residents blasted the $88 million in property tax breaks the planned $1 billion Harbor Point development is set to receive, arguing that a portion of the money should be used to help the poor. "You should not have luxury communities by developing off of the misery in the city," said Rev. Alvin C. Hathaway, Sr. of Union Baptist Church.  The committee hearing was called by City Councilman Carl Stokes, who has accused the Baltimore Development Corporation, the city's quasi-public development arm, of drawing an inappropriate map so that Harbor Point could received Enterprise Zone tax credits -- which are meant for impoverished areas -- that it could not have qualified for on its own. Stokes has alleged that Harbor Point is specifically taking advantage of the poverty in the Perkins Homes to receive its tax breaks, an allegation the BDC denies.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | January 24, 2013
The O'Malley administration kicked off an effort to bring medical services to disadvantaged neighborhoods Thursday by designating the state's first five "health enterprise zones" created under a law passed last year. Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown, who led the administration's efforts to launch the $4 million-a-year pilot project, said the five zones will be located in West Baltimore, Annapolis, Capitol Heights (Prince George's County), Greater Lexington Park (St. Mary's County) and Dorchester-Caroline counties.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | January 17, 2013
Tax-break Enterprise Zones in Baltimore and the Eastern Shore will expand after getting an OK from Maryland's economic development agency, the state said Thursday. The city's zone was altered to include Harbor Point and nearby portions of South Central Avenue and South Eden Street "to further encourage the economic development of the Harbor East community," the state Department of Business and Economic Development said in a statement. Harbor Point and the nearby streets had been removed from the zone last year as part of a broad reduction in the eligible area.
NEWS
November 23, 2012
Why do some people get sicker and die sooner than others? The answer involves more than our genes, behaviors and medical care, according to a new study by the Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies and the advocacy group Equity Inc. It turns out that where we live is often the strongest predictor of our well-being, and that disparities along racial and class lines in health outcomes and access to care mirror the inequities in every other aspect...
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2012
The Baltimore Development Corp. is to hold a hearing Wednesday evening to discuss whether Harbor Point, the future home of Exelon Corp.'s Baltimore headquarters, should again be included in a state-wide tax credit program. John Paterakis' Harbor East Development Group LLC has put together an application requesting that Harbor Point and two nearby blocks between Fleet and Lancaster streets be included in Baltimore's Enterprise Zone. The submission would need approval from the Baltimore City Council and the Maryland Department of Business and Economic Development for the roughly 32-acre site to be included.
BUSINESS
December 24, 1997
State economic development officials designated parts of three counties as enterprise zones yesterday, hoping to bring jobs and help jump-start languishing economies.The new enterprise zones in Cecil, Wicomico and Worcester counties bring to 35 the number of areas in the state offering tax breaks and other incentives to business in exchange for job creation.In Cecil, the enterprise zones designated by the state's Department of Business and Economic Development in Elkton, Perryville, North East and Port Deposit represent the first ones in the rural county.
NEWS
By NEAL R. PEIRCE | July 5, 1993
Washington. -- Prospects are murky for the Clinton administration's enterprise-zone plan, approved by the House but zeroed out -- at least for now -- in the Senate version of the budget-reduction plan.The Clinton camp has given this evergreen proposal a new spin by suggesting a two-tier approach. There'd be 10 ''empowerment zones'' in which firms could get up to $5,000 yearly tax credits for each poor-zone resident they employ. Also, 100 designated ''enterprise communities'' wouldn't get to share in the tax breaks, but would share preferential status for such federal initiatives as ''micro-enterprise'' loan funds and community-policing subsidies.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2012
The Baltimore City Council on Monday approved a new map for the city's enterprise zone that significantly realigns and diminishes its footprint, from 22,000 acres to 14,000 acres. The zone is designed to support investment in and improvement of impoverished sections by offering tax breaks to businesses in the areas. The state reimburses the city for half the lost tax revenue. The new map, created by the Baltimore Development Corp., eliminated residential areas but also cut out some business zones that have seen a change in fortune over the last decade, including Harbor East and Harbor Point.
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