Advertisement
HomeCollectionsEnterprise Schools
IN THE NEWS

Enterprise Schools

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Mark Bomster and Mark Bomster,Staff Writer | April 26, 1993
Supporters of Baltimore City College are launching a $1 million, three-year fund-raising drive to shore-up the "magnet" high school for the humanities.Concerned about class sizes, the faculty-student ratio, outdated equipment and the condition of the building, the school's 23-member Board of Visitors is calling on City's alumni and friends to supplement the money City gets from the school system."There are some serious deficiencies that need to be addressed in terms of what the city school system can provide," said Amy Mortimer, executive director of the Board of Visitors, a group of trustees for the 154-year-old school, the nation's third-oldest public high school.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Jean Thompson and Jean Thompson,SUN STAFF | November 22, 1995
Baltimore's school board turned its back on Education Alternatives Inc. yesterday, advising Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke to end the firm's five-year contract with the city this academic year.After a closed meeting with the mayor late yesterday, board members said their support for the 3 1/2 -year-old experiment has eroded during weeks of unfruitful fee negotiations with the Minneapolis school-management firm.Labor representatives also recommended ending EAI's management and consulting deals affecting 12 city schools.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Mark Bomster and Mark Bomster,Staff Writer | April 26, 1993
Supporters of Baltimore City College are launching a $1 million, three-year fund-raising drive to shore-up the "magnet" high school for the humanities.Concerned about class sizes, the faculty-student ratio, outdated equipment and the condition of the building, the school's 23-member Board of Visitors is calling on City's alumni and friends to supplement the money City gets from the school system."There are some serious deficiencies that need to be addressed in terms of what the city school system can provide," said Amy Mortimer, executive director of the Board of Visitors, a group of trustees for the 154-year-old school, the nation's third-oldest public high school.
NEWS
By Phillip H. Farfel | October 27, 1995
Superintendent Walter G. Amprey and the Baltimore City Public Schools' central office administration recently were harshly criticized by state officials for the performance of city students in the Maryland Student Performance Program, for a lack of accountability in special education and other areas, and for an ''unwillingness'' to institute management reforms HTC recommended in the 1991 Towers Perrin/Cresap report. I believe this criticism is unwarranted and I am compelled to make several observations about student achievement, school system management and operations, and educational reforms.
NEWS
By Phillip H. Farfel | October 27, 1995
Superintendent Walter G. Amprey and the Baltimore City Public Schools' central office administration recently were harshly criticized by state officials for the performance of city students in the Maryland Student Performance Program, for a lack of accountability in special education and other areas, and for an ''unwillingness'' to institute management reforms HTC recommended in the 1991 Towers Perrin/Cresap report. I believe this criticism is unwarranted and I am compelled to make several observations about student achievement, school system management and operations, and educational reforms.
NEWS
By Gary Gately and Gary Gately,Staff Writer | September 18, 1993
The private Minneapolis firm that took over operation of nine Baltimore schools last year has won the support of Superintendent Walter G. Amprey in its bid to privatize some functions at 24 other city schools.Education Alternatives Inc., which has sunk nearly $8 million into its "Tesseract" experiment here, has delivered its sales pitch to all 24 schools and received non-binding letters of intent to contract for services at City College and Robert W. Coleman Elementary.News of the city's plans to consider expanding EAI's role surfaced in late August, when school and company officials confirmed discussions centering on City, Coleman and William H. Lemmell Middle School.
NEWS
By Harold Jackson and Harold Jackson,Sun Staff Writer | January 25, 1995
Schools Superintendent Walter G. Amprey admitted yesterday that it was a mistake to get rid of "breakthrough teams" that patrolled city high schools in an effort to circumvent violent incidents.The teams sought to counsel suspected gang members and other youngsters most likely to become violent.Dr. Amprey made the observation while discussing the fatal shooting of one young man and the wounding of another Monday at Northern High School. The shooting occurred in front of the school as classes had ended and students were streaming out of the building.
NEWS
By Gary Gately and Gary Gately,Sun Staff Writer | January 13, 1995
Baltimore's move to school-based management, a cornerstone of reform efforts, has been poorly planned, fragmented and hindered by a lack of training -- according to a new report that a key legislator labeled "devastating."Superintendent Walter G. Amprey said he agreed with the state-commissioned report, which assesses how well the city has shifted money, staff and authority from headquarters to schools. "We have many problems. . . . We are working them through."The schools chief, now in his fourth year at the helm, added that the restructuring is progressing and principals have more decision-making authority than ever.
NEWS
By Gary Gately and Gary Gately,Sun Staff Writer | September 8, 1994
Think of them as branch offices scattered all over Baltimore, run largely by governing boards consisting of principals, parents, teachers and their aides, neighborhood residents, merchants, students, community activists.Their product: education.Their customers: students, parents, taxpayers.Think of Baltimore's 182 public schools this way, say school system leaders, to understand enterprise, as in "enterprise schools" -- the city's unprecedented move to transfer decision-making and staff from headquarters to all individual schools.
NEWS
By Gary Gately and Eric Siegel and Gary Gately and Eric Siegel,Staff Writers Staff writer Ian Johnson contributed to this article | December 4, 1993
In a bid to halt Baltimore's pioneering "Tesseract" experiment in school privatization, the teachers' union has challenged the legality of a city contract with a Minneapolis company to operate nine public schools.In its suit, the union contends that Baltimore's contract with Education Alternatives Inc. (EAI), now in its second year, violates charter requirements that the city maintain control of public schools.The lawsuit, filed this week in city Circuit Court, also claims that the five-year privatization venture discriminates against thousands of students because "Tesseract" schools receive more city money per pupil than do most other public schools in the city.
NEWS
By Harold Jackson and Harold Jackson,Sun Staff Writer | January 25, 1995
Schools Superintendent Walter G. Amprey admitted yesterday that it was a mistake to get rid of "breakthrough teams" that patrolled city high schools in an effort to circumvent violent incidents.The teams sought to counsel suspected gang members and other youngsters most likely to become violent.Dr. Amprey made the observation while discussing the fatal shooting of one young man and the wounding of another Monday at Northern High School. The shooting occurred in front of the school as classes had ended and students were streaming out of the building.
NEWS
By Gary Gately and Gary Gately,Sun Staff Writer | January 13, 1995
Baltimore's move to school-based management, a cornerstone of reform efforts, has been poorly planned, fragmented and hindered by a lack of training -- according to a new report that a key legislator labeled "devastating."Superintendent Walter G. Amprey said he agreed with the state-commissioned report, which assesses how well the city has shifted money, staff and authority from headquarters to schools. "We have many problems. . . . We are working them through."The schools chief, now in his fourth year at the helm, added that the restructuring is progressing and principals have more decision-making authority than ever.
NEWS
By Gary Gately and Gary Gately,Sun Staff Writer | September 8, 1994
Think of them as branch offices scattered all over Baltimore, run largely by governing boards consisting of principals, parents, teachers and their aides, neighborhood residents, merchants, students, community activists.Their product: education.Their customers: students, parents, taxpayers.Think of Baltimore's 182 public schools this way, say school system leaders, to understand enterprise, as in "enterprise schools" -- the city's unprecedented move to transfer decision-making and staff from headquarters to all individual schools.
NEWS
By Gary Gately and Eric Siegel and Gary Gately and Eric Siegel,Staff Writers Staff writer Ian Johnson contributed to this article | December 4, 1993
In a bid to halt Baltimore's pioneering "Tesseract" experiment in school privatization, the teachers' union has challenged the legality of a city contract with a Minneapolis company to operate nine public schools.In its suit, the union contends that Baltimore's contract with Education Alternatives Inc. (EAI), now in its second year, violates charter requirements that the city maintain control of public schools.The lawsuit, filed this week in city Circuit Court, also claims that the five-year privatization venture discriminates against thousands of students because "Tesseract" schools receive more city money per pupil than do most other public schools in the city.
NEWS
By Gary Gately and Gary Gately,Staff Writer | September 18, 1993
The private Minneapolis firm that took over operation of nine Baltimore schools last year has won the support of Superintendent Walter G. Amprey in its bid to privatize some functions at 24 other city schools.Education Alternatives Inc., which has sunk nearly $8 million into its "Tesseract" experiment here, has delivered its sales pitch to all 24 schools and received non-binding letters of intent to contract for services at City College and Robert W. Coleman Elementary.News of the city's plans to consider expanding EAI's role surfaced in late August, when school and company officials confirmed discussions centering on City, Coleman and William H. Lemmell Middle School.
NEWS
By Michael A. Fletcher and Michael James BALTIMORE CITY and Michael A. Fletcher and Michael James BALTIMORE CITY,Staff Writers | September 2, 1993
Articles in The Sun yesterday and Wednesday included an incorrect address for Montebello Elementary School. The correct address is the 2000 block of E. 32nd St.The Sun regrets the error.Baltimore's first day of school yesterday wasn't problem-free -- an infestation of rats delayed the opening of one school and a stabbing interrupted a class at another -- but city officials said they were pleased with the overall picture."On balance, it was a success," said Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke. "I visited four schools and [Superintendent Walter G.]
NEWS
By Michael A. Fletcher and Michael James BALTIMORE CITY and Michael A. Fletcher and Michael James BALTIMORE CITY,Staff Writers | September 2, 1993
Articles in The Sun yesterday and Wednesday included an incorrect address for Montebello Elementary School. The correct address is the 2000 block of E. 32nd St.The Sun regrets the error.Baltimore's first day of school yesterday wasn't problem-free -- an infestation of rats delayed the opening of one school and a stabbing interrupted a class at another -- but city officials said they were pleased with the overall picture."On balance, it was a success," said Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke. "I visited four schools and [Superintendent Walter G.]
NEWS
By Jean Thompson and Jean Thompson,SUN STAFF | November 22, 1995
Baltimore's school board turned its back on Education Alternatives Inc. yesterday, advising Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke to end the firm's five-year contract with the city this academic year.After a closed meeting with the mayor late yesterday, board members said their support for the 3 1/2 -year-old experiment has eroded during weeks of unfruitful fee negotiations with the Minneapolis school-management firm.Labor representatives also recommended ending EAI's management and consulting deals affecting 12 city schools.
NEWS
By Mark Bomster and Mark Bomster,Staff Writer | April 26, 1993
Supporters of Baltimore City College are launching a $1 million, three-year fund-raising drive to shore-up the "magnet" high school for the humanities.Concerned about class sizes, the faculty-student ratio, outdated equipment and the condition of the building, the school's 23-member Board of Visitors is calling on City's alumni and friends to supplement the money City gets from the school system."There are some serious deficiencies that need to be addressed in terms of what the city school system can provide," said Amy Mortimer, executive director of the Board of Visitors, a group of trustees for the 154-year-old school, the nation's third-oldest public high school.
NEWS
By Mark Bomster and Mark Bomster,Staff Writer | April 26, 1993
Supporters of Baltimore City College are launching a $1 million, three-year fund-raising drive to shore-up the "magnet" high school for the humanities.Concerned about class sizes, the faculty-student ratio, outdated equipment and the condition of the building, the school's 23-member Board of Visitors is calling on City's alumni and friends to supplement the money City gets from the school system."There are some serious deficiencies that need to be addressed in terms of what the city school system can provide," said Amy Mortimer, executive director of the Board of Visitors, a group of trustees for the 154-year-old school, the nation's third-oldest public high school.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.