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BUSINESS
February 9, 1996
The Enterprise Development Fund of the Baltimore Development Corp. will invest $250,000 in AssurQual, a company developing software for nursing homes, the city announced yesterday.The investment is a convertible debenture, a loan that can be converted to stock, BDC said. The Enterprise Development Fund is a venture capital effort of the BDC.AssurQual, founded in 1989, moved to Baltimore a year ago from Columbus, Ohio, and leases space in the South Harbor Business Incubator, a facility that houses 11 start-up and early-stage technology companies.
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BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | November 26, 2012
A group formed by a Maryland businessman argued in a report released Monday that the state's Department of Business and Economic Development is a political marketing organization rather than the job-creation agency it should be. The department needs to reorganize to attract more jobs to the state, and must better measure its performance and increase transparency, the Change Maryland report says. The group was founded by Larry Hogan, who heads an Annapolis real estate brokerage, worked as appointments secretary for Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. and contemplated a run against Gov. Martin O'Malley in 2010.
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BUSINESS
By John H. Gormley Jr. and John H. Gormley Jr.,Staff Writer | April 16, 1992
It might come as something of a surprise to the thousands of Marylanders who lost their jobs during the current recession, but the state's economy is the second strongest in the nation,according to an annual "report card" from the Corporation for Enterprise Development.The ratings, released today, cheered state economic development officials. "We're gratified for the way they sized us up," said Mark Wasserman, secretary of the state's Department of Economic and Employment Development.However, some academics and economic development professionals question the rosy picture of the Maryland economy painted by the report.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | August 30, 2002
K. Aubrey Gorman, a Rouse Co. executive who later headed a business arm of the Enterprise Foundation, died Monday of a respiratory ailment at Penobscot Bay Medical Center in Rockport, Maine. He was 78 and once lived in Baltimore's Guilford neighborhood. As the Columbia-based company's senior vice president for development, he helped change how people shopped in the 1950s and 1960s. He directed the land acquisition and construction for numerous enclosed shopping malls, including the original Harundale in Glen Burnie, the Village of Cross Keys in North Baltimore, Cherry Hill in Cherry Hill, N.J., and Perimeter in Atlanta.
NEWS
December 13, 2001
Maryland earned a spot among the top 10 states for economic development in a report card issued by the Corporation for Enterpnse Development. The state received an A rating for "performance," attributed to solid scores in job quality and equity and earnings. Maryland also received high marks for its low poverty rate and high college attainment. Another strong ranking came in "innovation assets," where the state scored first in both university and federal research and development. For more information, go to www.cfed.
NEWS
March 20, 1992
The Baltimore Inner Harbor development is being repeated around the world wherever ports have moved downriver from their origins and left abandoned waterfront that, like a properly irrigated desert, might bloom. Bloom with promenades and shops and cafes and the parade of humanity. And so Inner Harbors are being attempted from London to Sydney.The agreement of the Enterprise Development Co., creation of James Rouse of Harborplace, Cross Keys and Columbia fame, to take on a 14-acre development site in Belfast should spread hope across Northern Ireland, where endless sectarian strife and terrorism have so often killed hope.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts | June 19, 1991
James Rouse's Enterprise Development Co. and a local division of the Westinghouse Electric Corp. -- two economic powerhouses whose presence extends far beyond Maryland -- have been negotiating an arrangement that would enable them to work jointly on projects.If an alliance is formed, it would enable both companies, each with its special expertise, to continue operating separately yet take advantage of the skills and resources of the other.Founded in 1981, Enterprise is active in the development of festival marketplaces and mixed-use complexes, including Tempozan Marketplace in Osaka, Japan; Harbourside in Sydney, Australia; and Port Vell, a retail and entertainment project in Barcelona, Spain.
BUSINESS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,Staff Writer | March 17, 1992
The export of the Harborplace concept as a model for revitalizing depressed port cities around the world is about to face its toughest challenge yet -- in strife-torn Belfast.The Enterprise Development Co. of Columbia is set to develop a 14-acre site on the banks of the River Lagan in the Northern Ireland capital, which was recently described by a Northern Irish politician as "the killing fields of Europe."The company is wholly owned by The Enterprise Foundation, which Harborplace developer Jim Rouse founded in 1981 after retiring from day-to-day management of the Rouse Co. All profits from the Columbia company's development operations are funneled back to the foundation to develop low-income housing.
BUSINESS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,Staff Writer | March 17, 1992
The export of the Harborplace concept as a model for revitalizing depressed port cities around the world is about to face its toughest challenge yet -- in strife-torn Belfast.The Enterprise Development Co. of Columbia is set to develop a 14-acre site on the banks of the River Lagan in the Northern Ireland capital, which was recently described by a Northern Irish politician as "the killing fields of Europe."The company is wholly owned by The Enterprise Foundation, which Harborplace developer Jim Rouse founded in 1981 after retiring from day-to-day management of the Rouse Co. All profits from the Columbia company's development operations are funneled back to the foundation to develop low-income housing.
BUSINESS
By David Conn and David Conn,Annapolis Bureau of The Sun | August 8, 1991
ANNAPOLIS -- After 2 1/2 years and more than half a million dollars, state officials are finally paying attention to an enormous report on making Maryland's economy competitive.At a hearing before the House Economic Matters Committee yesterday, the state's outgoing economic development chief pledged that his department will use the report and others to present the legislature with a full-fledged statewide development strategy by November.That strategy will rely on the work of the Johns Hopkins Institute for Policy Studies, among other groups around the state, according to J. Randall Evans, who announced last week that he will resign in September as secretary of economic and employment development.
NEWS
December 13, 2001
Maryland earned a spot among the top 10 states for economic development in a report card issued by the Corporation for Enterpnse Development. The state received an A rating for "performance," attributed to solid scores in job quality and equity and earnings. Maryland also received high marks for its low poverty rate and high college attainment. Another strong ranking came in "innovation assets," where the state scored first in both university and federal research and development. For more information, go to www.cfed.
BUSINESS
February 9, 1996
The Enterprise Development Fund of the Baltimore Development Corp. will invest $250,000 in AssurQual, a company developing software for nursing homes, the city announced yesterday.The investment is a convertible debenture, a loan that can be converted to stock, BDC said. The Enterprise Development Fund is a venture capital effort of the BDC.AssurQual, founded in 1989, moved to Baltimore a year ago from Columbus, Ohio, and leases space in the South Harbor Business Incubator, a facility that houses 11 start-up and early-stage technology companies.
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Staff Writer | May 2, 1993
The J. L. Wickham Co. built its reputation on finding innovative solutions to industrial problems. Now Chairman Richard P. Sullivan has another goal for the Baltimore machine tool company -- making a profit."
BUSINESS
By John H. Gormley Jr. and John H. Gormley Jr.,Staff Writer | April 16, 1992
It might come as something of a surprise to the thousands of Marylanders who lost their jobs during the current recession, but the state's economy is the second strongest in the nation,according to an annual "report card" from the Corporation for Enterprise Development.The ratings, released today, cheered state economic development officials. "We're gratified for the way they sized us up," said Mark Wasserman, secretary of the state's Department of Economic and Employment Development.However, some academics and economic development professionals question the rosy picture of the Maryland economy painted by the report.
NEWS
March 20, 1992
The Baltimore Inner Harbor development is being repeated around the world wherever ports have moved downriver from their origins and left abandoned waterfront that, like a properly irrigated desert, might bloom. Bloom with promenades and shops and cafes and the parade of humanity. And so Inner Harbors are being attempted from London to Sydney.The agreement of the Enterprise Development Co., creation of James Rouse of Harborplace, Cross Keys and Columbia fame, to take on a 14-acre development site in Belfast should spread hope across Northern Ireland, where endless sectarian strife and terrorism have so often killed hope.
BUSINESS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,Staff Writer | March 17, 1992
The export of the Harborplace concept as a model for revitalizing depressed port cities around the world is about to face its toughest challenge yet -- in strife-torn Belfast.The Enterprise Development Co. of Columbia is set to develop a 14-acre site on the banks of the River Lagan in the Northern Ireland capital, which was recently described by a Northern Irish politician as "the killing fields of Europe."The company is wholly owned by The Enterprise Foundation, which Harborplace developer Jim Rouse founded in 1981 after retiring from day-to-day management of the Rouse Co. All profits from the Columbia company's development operations are funneled back to the foundation to develop low-income housing.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts | January 17, 1991
Ten years after he founded the Enterprise Foundation, a non-profit organization whose goal is to provide "fit and affordable" housing for all low-income Americans who need it, James Rouse is relinquishing the title of chief executive officer, effective in July.Trustees of the Enterprise Foundation voted earlier this week to approve the appointment of two Enterprise executives, F. Barton Harvey III and Paul C. Brophy, to succeed Mr. Rouse in his role as chief executive officer. Both will carry the title of vice chair and co-chief executive officer.
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Staff Writer | May 2, 1993
The J. L. Wickham Co. built its reputation on finding innovative solutions to industrial problems. Now Chairman Richard P. Sullivan has another goal for the Baltimore machine tool company -- making a profit."
BUSINESS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,Staff Writer | March 17, 1992
The export of the Harborplace concept as a model for revitalizing depressed port cities around the world is about to face its toughest challenge yet -- in strife-torn Belfast.The Enterprise Development Co. of Columbia is set to develop a 14-acre site on the banks of the River Lagan in the Northern Ireland capital, which was recently described by a Northern Irish politician as "the killing fields of Europe."The company is wholly owned by The Enterprise Foundation, which Harborplace developer Jim Rouse founded in 1981 after retiring from day-to-day management of the Rouse Co. All profits from the Columbia company's development operations are funneled back to the foundation to develop low-income housing.
BUSINESS
By David Conn and David Conn,Annapolis Bureau of The Sun | August 8, 1991
ANNAPOLIS -- After 2 1/2 years and more than half a million dollars, state officials are finally paying attention to an enormous report on making Maryland's economy competitive.At a hearing before the House Economic Matters Committee yesterday, the state's outgoing economic development chief pledged that his department will use the report and others to present the legislature with a full-fledged statewide development strategy by November.That strategy will rely on the work of the Johns Hopkins Institute for Policy Studies, among other groups around the state, according to J. Randall Evans, who announced last week that he will resign in September as secretary of economic and employment development.
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