Advertisement
HomeCollectionsEnter The Race
IN THE NEWS

Enter The Race

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By George Neff Lucas | June 14, 1995
The candidate suddenly foundA shortcut to moral high ground;It seems HollywoodIs up to no good --He says so in full Dole-by sound.* * *The speaker, if asked to his face,Are you planning to enter the race?Might answer, "Who knows?"But to Newt Hampshire goesA nice place to visit, in case.* * *Again from the Hill the old story:An amendment to flameproof old GloryLest an arsonist charA stripe or a star;0$ No flag-waver waves like a Tory.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2010
Put a Democratic congressman, a Republican opponent and a Libertarian challenger at the same candidates' forum table and what do you get? Agreement that some children of illegal immigrants should be afforded a way to become citizens and stay in the only country they've ever known. That was one highlight at Tuesday night's six-hour televised candidates' forum at Howard Community College sponsored by the Association of Community Services and the League of Women Voters. The show started at 4 p.m. with Howard County Executive Ken Ulman, a Democrat, and Republican challenger Trent Kittleman, and ran through all five County Council districts, the three General Assembly districts and Howard's two congressional districts before ending at 10 p.m. The results will be broadcast on Comcast and Verizon government cable channels through October.
Advertisement
NEWS
By JOSH MITCHELL and JOSH MITCHELL,SUN REPORTER | July 1, 2006
Baltimore County Executive James T. Smith Jr. made his intentions official yesterday, filing to run for re-election three days before the deadline. Accompanied by his chief of staff and campaign director, Smith filled out a candidate's form and spoke his name into a tape recorder at the county Board of Elections in Catonsville. "I've created a partnership with the people of Baltimore County, and I'm looking forward to continuing that partnership," Smith said outside the office's glass doors.
NEWS
By Brent Jones and Brent Jones,Sun Reporter | June 30, 2007
A. Robert Kaufman took his socialist agenda to The Block yesterday, where he announced his candidacy in the mayoral race and called for the creation of a "red-light district" where prostitution and drugs would be legal. Kaufman ran unsuccessfully for mayor in 2003 and 1999 and also lost bids for a U.S. Senate seat last year and in 2004. Over the years, he has run in other federal, state and local races and never won a seat. In 2003, he garnered 645 votes when he ran in the Democratic mayoral primary.
NEWS
January 28, 1992
In the days immediately after charges of sexual liaisons were made against Arkansas Gov. Bill Clinton in the supermarket tabloid Star, his showing in a tracking poll of New Hampshire Democrats fell dramatically. He led former Sen. Paul Tsongas 34-22 percent for the three days ending last Wednesday. By last Saturday, though, he trailed him 25-27 percent.Then on Sunday night, the governor and his wife responded to the charges on network television. In effect, he conceded past "problems" in his marriage but denied the most publicized ones.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser HTC and Tom Keyser HTC,SUN STAFF | September 6, 1996
After a brief respite allowing horses to careen around the daring turns of Timonium for 10 days, racing resumes today at Pimlico. Post time is 1: 10 p.m.The four-week meet features a quartet of $100,000 stakes races, including tomorrow's Safely Kept Stakes, a Grade III six-furlong dash for 3-year-old fillies. The others are for horses 3 and older: the Damascus Handicap on Sept. 14, a one-mile turf race; the Polynesian Stakes on Sept. 21, a Grade III 1 1/16-mile race and the Bald Eagle Breeders' Cup on Sept.
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Sun Staff Writer | June 5, 1994
Theodore J. Sophocleus wanted to be county executive four years ago. He still does.Mr. Sophocleus, who narrowly lost to Robert R. Neall in 1990, said Friday that he will stage a fund-raiser for "countywide office" June 26 at Michael's Eighth Avenue. He said he will formally announce his intention to seek the Democratic nomination for the Anne Arundel's top elective post then.Mr. Sophocleus, 55, had a difficult time deciding whether to run for county executive or the House of Delegates seat he was appointed to last year.
NEWS
June 21, 1994
By our count, a dozen prospective candidates for the #F Governor's Mansion have taken a look at the length of the pool, stuck a toe in the water and decided to sit this one out. From a physician to an asbestos litigator to a corporate CEO to members of Congress, a mayor, a county executive and two House speakers, the list of non-candidates is far longer than the list of actual contenders.This seems to be the year of political caution. The difficulty of launching a campaign that could cost $2 million or more is often mentioned as a reason.
NEWS
June 22, 1994
By scoring endorsements from the police and teachers unions in Baltimore County, as well as from the local AFL-CIO and the Battle Grove Democratic Club of Dundalk, Third District Councilman Charles A. Dutch Ruppersberger of Cockeysville can put some distance between himself and the other Democratic candidates for county executive.The union and political club backing means more than funds and volunteer troops for Mr. Ruppersberger; it also helps convey the impression that a bandwagon has begun to rev up and might rumble away from the opposition before long.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and Andrew A. Green and David Nitkin and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | July 14, 2005
Senate hopeful Kweisi Mfume said yesterday that unnamed Democratic Party "operatives" were trying to block his nomination by orchestrating which candidates ran against him, and he said the party risked losing traditional support from black voters as a result. "I think there may be some Democratic operatives in and out of the official party that would like to guide the process, much like they have guided other processes in the past," Mfume said in an interview last night. The party, he said, could lose its long-standing support from minority groups if leaders actively work against the candidacy of a prominent black politician, he said.
NEWS
By John Fritze and John Fritze,Sun reporter | December 23, 2006
Del. Jill P. Carter said yesterday she plans to enter next year's race for mayor of Baltimore and that she expects to formally file for the office as soon as next month, making her the fifth candidate to jump into the crowded field. Carter, 43, has represented the 41st District in Northwest Baltimore since 2003 and has become increasingly critical of the city's police practices under Mayor Martin O'Malley, who will become governor next month. "At this point, I don't see any evidence that there is any other potential candidate that would bring the needed change and fresh perspective and independence to that office," Carter said yesterday.
NEWS
By JUSTIN FENTON and JUSTIN FENTON,SUN REPORTER | July 16, 2006
After weeks of accusations that he had leaked a sensitive internal document to the media and had been abusing compensatory time off, Capt. Gregory Carlevaro was called into Sheriff R. Thomas Golding's office and told that he had a day to accept a demotion or retire, according to court records. But when Carlevaro asked why he had been demoted, Golding told him he was not "buying [Carlevaro's] story" and that he'd lost confidence in him. "I just can't pinpoint anything right now," Carlevaro said he was told.
NEWS
By JOSH MITCHELL and JOSH MITCHELL,SUN REPORTER | July 1, 2006
Baltimore County Executive James T. Smith Jr. made his intentions official yesterday, filing to run for re-election three days before the deadline. Accompanied by his chief of staff and campaign director, Smith filled out a candidate's form and spoke his name into a tape recorder at the county Board of Elections in Catonsville. "I've created a partnership with the people of Baltimore County, and I'm looking forward to continuing that partnership," Smith said outside the office's glass doors.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and Andrew A. Green and David Nitkin and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | July 14, 2005
Senate hopeful Kweisi Mfume said yesterday that unnamed Democratic Party "operatives" were trying to block his nomination by orchestrating which candidates ran against him, and he said the party risked losing traditional support from black voters as a result. "I think there may be some Democratic operatives in and out of the official party that would like to guide the process, much like they have guided other processes in the past," Mfume said in an interview last night. The party, he said, could lose its long-standing support from minority groups if leaders actively work against the candidacy of a prominent black politician, he said.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 17, 2003
WASHINGTON - Retired Gen. Wesley K. Clark, a persistent critic of President Bush's Iraq policy and his handling of the war on terrorism, is expected to join the Democratic presidential contest today. The former NATO commander brings a hefty military resume to a party sometimes viewed as weak on national defense. Clark, who hopes to capitalize on the increased importance of security issues since Sept. 11, 2001, has been hinting at a presidential run for a year but has never been active in Democratic politics.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | June 21, 2001
John M. Kane, a Montgomery County business leader and a highway construction advocate, has emerged as a potential contender for the Republican nomination for governor if Rep. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. decides not to run. Kane, of Potomac, owner of a moving and storage company based in Elkridge, said he would form an exploratory committee to consider a long-shot race if Ehrlich decides to remain in Congress. The 40-year-old businessman has never run for public office, but Republicans take his potential candidacy seriously.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jules Witcover | January 22, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Deeply frustrated over President Bush's decision to go to war in the Persian Gulf and the disintegrating state of the economy, former Sen. George McGovern, the 1972 Democratic standard-bearer, is considering a third try for his party's presidential nomination in 1992.McGovern, now 68, has been in increasing demand on college campuses ever since the American military buildup in the gulf in August. He says he is being urged by Democrats around the country to enter the race as a voice of dissent to Bush's policies at home and abroad.
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Sun Staff Writer | May 8, 1994
Even though Anne Arundel County Executive Robert R. Neall has insisted he is getting out of politics, potential Democratic and Republican candidates for the office continue to question whether he really means it.At least three prominent contenders -- state Del. Theodore J. Sophocleus, a Linthicum Democrat; Robert Agee, a Crofton Democrat and a former top county administrator; and former Del. John Leopold, a Pasadena Republican -- are hesitating to enter...
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | May 1, 2001
REP. ROBERT L. Ehrlich Jr. says he won't decide until summer whether to jump into the 2002 gubernatorial race, but the Republican dream candidate has been getting around the state and laying the groundwork for a potential campaign. In recent weeks, Ehrlich has met with the editorial boards of several newspapers -- The Sun, the Capital in Annapolis, the Frederick News-Post and the Montgomery Gazette, among others. He's met with the Chamber of Commerce in Montgomery County and with J. W. Marriott Jr., chairman of Marriott International Inc. and a key GOP money generator.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Gady A. Epstein and Thomas W. Waldron and Gady A. Epstein,SUN STAFF | January 16, 2001
WILL HE run? Against a Kennedy? These are questions being pondered in Maryland politics these days. The "he" is Mayor Martin O'Malley, who henceforth must be referred to as the "popular mayor of Baltimore" after he hit stratospheric highs in a statewide poll released last week. The Kennedy, of course, is Kathleen Kennedy Townsend, the state's lieutenant governor, who until now has appeared to have the inside track in next year's governor's race. The poll results confirmed her standing as the presumptive front-runner - she's far better-known than her most likely rivals, and well-liked - but it also gave people occasion to rethink the governor's race for a moment.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.