Advertisement
HomeCollectionsEnsure
IN THE NEWS

Ensure

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
April 2, 2008
Baltimore's high school graduation rate has been found wanting yet again - an abysmal 35 percent and fourth lowest among the nation's 50 largest districts, according to a new study. Even worse, the gap between the city's rate and the 82 percent rate in neighboring suburban districts was the nation's largest. State and city education officials are challenging the calculations - and even have two different calculations of their own. But they rightfully concede that whatever the numbers, they are far too low. Beyond Baltimore, the lack of urgency to help more students finish high school is apparent in similarly disturbing statistics across the country.
ARTICLES BY DATE
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn and The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2014
The state's Mental Hygiene Administration didn't have adequate procedures to ensure consumers given care were eligible, according to audit by the Department of Legislative Services during fiscal 2013. The state funds in question totaled $16.4 million. The total budget that year was $788 million when federal funds were counted. The audit also found reviews weren't done in a timely manner by an accounting firm hired to monitor some of the agency's fiscal functions, with some reviews taking up to an extra 21 months.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
By American Banker | January 19, 1991
NEW YORK (American Banker) -- U.S. bankers have built up their cash positions substantially in recent weeks, in part to ensure that borrowers would have access to credit during a war in the Persian Gulf.One measure of the cash buildup: Excess reserves held by banks in the Federal Reserve System have skyrocketed from $800 million to $3.5 billion in past few weeks. On top of that, banks are probably holding even more in their own coffers.First Interstate Bancorp alone has decided to hold an extra $1 billion in cash to ensure that its corporate clients remain liquid during the current crisis.
SPORTS
By Bob Hough and Baltimore Sun Media Group | September 24, 2014
Archbishop Spalding girls soccer coach Ashly Kennedy was not immediately certain who scored the go-ahead goal against Severn on Wednesday. By the time Sarah Ensor was identified as the goal's author, the No. 8 Cavaliers had won their 15th straight regular season game in the Interscholastic Athletic Association of Maryland A Conference against teams other than McDonogh. Spalding fought back from a late deficit and scored two goals in the final 13 minutes to knock off the No. 3 Admirals, 2-1. "The energy was the game-changer in today's game," Spalding coach Ashly Kennedy said.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | February 14, 2004
Transportation Secretary Robert L. Flanagan defended his department's inquiries into a prominent disability rights activist's transportation arrangements yesterday, saying he needed to know whether the advocate was getting preferential treatment from a state contractor. Flanagan said department officials had an obligation to ensure that Yellow Transportation Inc., a contractor that provides van and cab service for the disabled, wasn't providing service for Joel D. Myerberg that wasn't available to other riders.
NEWS
January 5, 2001
WHEN LOCAL jurisdictions established programs to protect victims and witnesses before and during trials, they turned to Anne Arundel County. The Anne Arundel state's attorney's office was the pioneer in comforting nervous witnesses who take the stand. So it was inexcusable -- and grossly negligent on the part of the state's attorney -- that two key witnesses in a sensitive racial vandalism trial never made it to court Tuesday. As a result, charges were dismissed against a man accused of placing a white hood on the statue of the late African-American legislator, Aris T. Allen, and putting Confederate flags in its hands.
NEWS
October 21, 2008
Funeral processions for law enforcement officers are an outpouring of respect, but can be a traffic nightmare for other drivers. And while the state police do their best to alert motorists with highway message boards and the like, there should be some other way to ensure both a respectful escort for an officer or firefighter killed in the line of duty and safe and speedy passage for highway travelers. Part of the problem, as evidenced by recent complaints to Baltimore Sun columnist Michael Dresser, is that police escorts aren't limited to funerals of law enforcement officers.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | March 17, 2005
DOES BALTIMORE need some sort of inclusionary zoning law? City Councilman Bernard C. "Jack" Young thinks it does. Young, who represents East Baltimore's 12th District, introduced legislation this week to ensure the creation of affordable housing in the city's up-and-coming neighborhoods. Under Young's bill, new or rehabilitated residential developments of 30 units or more that receive city financial assistance or are built on city-owned land would have to set aside at least 10 percent of their units to be affordable.
NEWS
November 23, 1993
FIRE* Taneytown: Taneytown, Harney and Pleasant Valley firefighters were dispatched for a chimney fire in a house on Old Taneytown Pike at 12:44 p.m. Saturday. Units were out for 2 1/2 hours while firefighters extinguished the blaze, cleaned the chimney and checked the building to ensure the fire had not spread to other parts of the house.
NEWS
January 3, 1999
To ensure even cooking, cut apples for pie into slices of uniform thickness. Firm baking-apple slices should be about 1/4-inch thick. Softer, early harvest varieties hold their shape better when slices are 1/2- to 3/4-inch thick.- Cole's Cooking A to Z
NEWS
By Michael J. Wilson | September 1, 2014
Fifty years ago this week, the Food Stamp Act of 1964 was signed into law. The goal was to ensure that those of us with the least would not be without food. In the ensuing decades, the program adapted to cultural, economic and technological changes and has provided millions of people with better nutrition. Today, the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP, the modern incarnation of food stamps) remains our nation's most effective tool in the fight against hunger. The Food Supplement Program (FSP, Maryland's name for SNAP)
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2014
The FBI has joined Baltimore County police in the hunt for a man wanted in a Lansdowne stabbing earlier this week, and his girlfriend, who also remains missing. The U.S. Attorney's Office in Maryland has issued a warrant for unlawful flight to avoid prosecution for Rony Leonel Deleon, 28, who is wanted by Baltimore County police for a stabbing in the in the 3000 block of Bero Road. FBI officials said Deleon is no longer in the Baltimore area and likely fled the state. Deleon is Hispanic, 5'06", about 145 pounds, with black hair and brown eyes.
NEWS
August 24, 2014
At least five undocumented immigrants U.S. officials recently deported back to their homes in Honduras turned up dead at the morgue in San Pedro Sula, the Los Angeles Times reported . According to other news accounts, the victims ranged in age from 12 to 18, and all five had died of gunshot wounds. The director of the morgue speculated the killings were the work of criminal gangs in retribution for the children's refusal to become members or pay protection money to the thugs who terrorized their neighborhood.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | August 19, 2014
Maryland men's soccer coach Sasho Cirovski has seen more than a dozen of his players leave school early to pursue professional careers. The departures have often left Cirovski to wonder whether his former athletes would eventually come back to finish their undergraduate degrees. With a new program announced Tuesday by Maryland athletic director Kevin Anderson, athletes in all of the school's sports will be able to return with their scholarships intact as long as they left the university in good academic and social standing.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2014
Sometimes, they offer help solving math problems, or writing sentences, or forming short paragraphs. Yet often, the adults of A-OK Mentoring-Tutoring of Columbia help Howard County students unlock their potential simply by giving an hour a week of attention. "The focus of our intervention is building a strong, encouraging relationship, where the child feels valued and important. That's the first big step," said Chaya Kaplan, executive director of the volunteer nonprofit, which partners with the school system to enhance students' academic and social development.
NEWS
By Erica Puentes | May 28, 2014
I am a proud Baltimore City College and Roland Park Middle School alumna who now attends the University of Maryland. I want to thank the City College and Polytechnic Institute students, alumni, friends and teachers whose lobbying efforts helped secure funding for the gifted programs that allowed me to receive a quality education in Baltimore and will - as of Tuesday night's school board vote - continue to provide opportunities to city kids. My academic journey began in an elementary school in my West Baltimore neighborhood.
NEWS
May 24, 2006
Young and old turned out last weekend for the mid month family May Day festival at South River Colony in Edgewater. Food, balloon art, a farmers' market, pony rides and crafts helped ensure a joyous spring day.
NEWS
By Caroline Little | May 21, 2014
Every day, city hall reporters at local newspapers distill hours of city council meetings into cogent stories that inform readers about how their elected officials are spending their tax dollars. Sports reporters document the successes of the high school team. Investigative reporters dig through thousands of pages of documents to expose government corruption, waste or ineffectiveness. This journalism plays a vital role in local communities and in our nation's democracy. But it also costs money: Newspapers continue to invest more than $5 billion a year in journalism - far more than any other medium in the United States.
NEWS
April 14, 2014
Maryland is already one of the best educated states in the nation, ranking at or near the top when it comes to the percentage of residents with college and post-graduate degrees. But state leaders, looking at an increasingly competitive, knowledge-based global economy, think that's not going to be nearly good enough. About 45 percent of the state's adults have at least an associate's degree now, but state leaders decided in 2009 that it should aim to bump that up to 55 percent by 2025.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.