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By Arden Moore and Arden Moore,Fort Lauderdale Sun-Sentinel | November 2, 1993
College-bound high school seniors can now take a walking tour of Tulane University in New Orleans without leaving their towns.With a few clicks of a computer mouse, students can pinpoint the top three colleges in the country that best meet their needs within minutes.In some instances, they can bypass the mailbox and deliver student profiles and applications via a computer modem to certain colleges. They can listen to students and professors talk about specific degree programs or social activities from the computer screen.
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NEWS
By Reginald S. Avery | June 26, 2009
Recently, the American Enterprise Institute for Public Policy Research released a report pointing out that at 19 percent, Coppin State University's retention and graduation rates rank among the lowest in the nation. Those numbers are based on a six-year cohort dating from 2000-2006. We acknowledge this. We understand our obligation to be good stewards of the public's investment in us and that we will be held accountable. Improving retention and graduation rates has been the No. 1 priority of my nearly 16-month tenure as president.
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NEWS
By Suzanne Loudermilk and Suzanne Loudermilk,SUN STAFF | September 3, 1996
Due to incomplete information provided by Towson State University, an article in Tuesday's editions incorrectly listed the number of international students at the school. Including its undergraduate and graduate divisions and English Language Center, the university has 419 international students this semester, compared with 298 in fall 1993.The Sun regrets the errors.Pub Date: 9/06/96When classes start at 8 a.m. this morning at Towson State University, the largest freshman class in 15 years will be finding its way around campus.
NEWS
By Matt Simon and Matt Simon,Special to The Sun | June 22, 2008
With economic pressures apparently pushing families to reconsider spending tens of thousands of dollars per year on tuition, many of Maryland's private colleges say they are being forced to use new tactics this year to meet their enrollment targets for this fall. From dipping deep into their waiting lists to putting together more aggressive packages of financial aid and loans, higher education officials say they are facing major challenges to ensure that the high school seniors they admitted last month actually attend in August.
NEWS
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN STAFF | September 28, 1996
At many private colleges throughout the Northeast, enrollments have shot higher, far beyond expected levels, leaving educators scrambling to figure out why.Each campus offers a host of convincing reasons for its growth. At Washington College, for example, officials talk about new scholarships for honor students. At Maryland Institute, College of Art, administrators speak of new facilities. And at Western Maryland College, the rise is attributed partly to an aggressive new advertising campaign.
NEWS
By Matt Simon and Matt Simon,Special to The Sun | June 22, 2008
With economic pressures apparently pushing families to reconsider spending tens of thousands of dollars per year on tuition, many of Maryland's private colleges say they are being forced to use new tactics this year to meet their enrollment targets for this fall. From dipping deep into their waiting lists to putting together more aggressive packages of financial aid and loans, higher education officials say they are facing major challenges to ensure that the high school seniors they admitted last month actually attend in August.
NEWS
By Reginald S. Avery | June 26, 2009
Recently, the American Enterprise Institute for Public Policy Research released a report pointing out that at 19 percent, Coppin State University's retention and graduation rates rank among the lowest in the nation. Those numbers are based on a six-year cohort dating from 2000-2006. We acknowledge this. We understand our obligation to be good stewards of the public's investment in us and that we will be held accountable. Improving retention and graduation rates has been the No. 1 priority of my nearly 16-month tenure as president.
NEWS
By JoAnne C. Broadwater and JoAnne C. Broadwater,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 20, 2003
At a time when college costs can rival the price of a luxury car, institutions nationwide are working hard to avoid sticker shock on the part of anxious parents and prospective students. And like the price of a car, financial aid experts say, college costs can be negotiable. Thanks to grants, scholarships, loans and work study, as few as 15 percent to 20 percent of students at many of the nation's more than 3,000 colleges and universities pay full price -- even in a time of rising enrollment and tuition prices.
EXPLORE
October 28, 2011
St. Mary of the Mills School , 106 St. Mary's Place, will host a Fall Open House on Nov. 13, from 2 to 4 p.m. Contact Val Makarsky, director of enrollment management, for more information at 301-498-1433, ext. 557 or vmakarsky@stmaryofthemills.org .
NEWS
June 8, 2004
Westminster pond to close for three days Carroll County will close the Westminster Community Pond to the public for three days beginning June 21. The closing will allow work crews to repave the entry road and parking lots at the pond, located on Route 140 north of Sullivan Road. The project should be completed within three days, weather permitting, officials said. McDaniel College promotes O'Connell to vice president McDaniel College in Westminster has promoted Martha O'Connell to vice president for enrollment management and dean of admissions, a newly created position on the senior management team.
NEWS
By JoAnne C. Broadwater and JoAnne C. Broadwater,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 20, 2003
At a time when college costs can rival the price of a luxury car, institutions nationwide are working hard to avoid sticker shock on the part of anxious parents and prospective students. And like the price of a car, financial aid experts say, college costs can be negotiable. Thanks to grants, scholarships, loans and work study, as few as 15 percent to 20 percent of students at many of the nation's more than 3,000 colleges and universities pay full price -- even in a time of rising enrollment and tuition prices.
NEWS
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN STAFF | September 28, 1996
At many private colleges throughout the Northeast, enrollments have shot higher, far beyond expected levels, leaving educators scrambling to figure out why.Each campus offers a host of convincing reasons for its growth. At Washington College, for example, officials talk about new scholarships for honor students. At Maryland Institute, College of Art, administrators speak of new facilities. And at Western Maryland College, the rise is attributed partly to an aggressive new advertising campaign.
NEWS
By Suzanne Loudermilk and Suzanne Loudermilk,SUN STAFF | September 3, 1996
Due to incomplete information provided by Towson State University, an article in Tuesday's editions incorrectly listed the number of international students at the school. Including its undergraduate and graduate divisions and English Language Center, the university has 419 international students this semester, compared with 298 in fall 1993.The Sun regrets the errors.Pub Date: 9/06/96When classes start at 8 a.m. this morning at Towson State University, the largest freshman class in 15 years will be finding its way around campus.
FEATURES
By Arden Moore and Arden Moore,Fort Lauderdale Sun-Sentinel | November 2, 1993
College-bound high school seniors can now take a walking tour of Tulane University in New Orleans without leaving their towns.With a few clicks of a computer mouse, students can pinpoint the top three colleges in the country that best meet their needs within minutes.In some instances, they can bypass the mailbox and deliver student profiles and applications via a computer modem to certain colleges. They can listen to students and professors talk about specific degree programs or social activities from the computer screen.
BUSINESS
August 2, 2006
Banking-finance Provident Bank appointed Lori L. David as a vice president within the Baltimore regional bank's operations division. The Columbia Bank announces the appointments of Peter Forte to assistant vice president, senior underwriter; Martin H. Madera to vice president, commercial banking; and Diana Covell to commercial banker. K Bank, headquartered in Owings Mills, named Diana T. Wolfe to the staff as a residential loan executive. She will be based at the regional bank's construction permanent lending office in Upper Marlboro.
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