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September 1, 2011
Every few years, officials of the county government and its school system pour too much time and resources into a process that creates ill feelings among parents and children and headaches all around, all because no one seems able to predict with any degree of certainty where local classroom populations will bulge and where they will shrink. School redistricting is inevitable, of course, but the seemingly endless need for wholesale changes to the map points toward systemic flaws.
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NEWS
By Joe Burris and The Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2014
Coppin State University suffered a $2.5 million revenue shortfall this fall because of a drop in enrollment, and school officials said Tuesday that the deficit is being offset with cuts to the administration and other cost-saving measures rather than tuition increases. Coppin State spokeswoman Tiffany Jones said Tuesday that the school enrolled 3,133 students this fall, 250 less than a year ago. Tuition, plus fees, for in-state students is about $6,000. To offset part of the shortfall, a school vice president and an assistant vice president have been let go, Jones said.
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NEWS
By Amanda Yeager, ayeager@tribune.com | January 3, 2014
The Howard County Housing department will start accepting applications for the county's Moderate Income Housing Unit program on Thursday, Jan. 2. The January open enrollment period for the program will end Friday, Jan. 31. The MIHU program requires housing developers to sell or rent a percentage of new units to moderate-income households. To offer more information on the MIHU program, the Housing department will also host a free "MIHU Buyers and Renters Workshop" on Tuesday, Jan. 14 from 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. at the Gateway Building in Columbia.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn and The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2014
The state health insurance exchange continued enrolling consumers in Medicaid, adding almost 22,000 new people to the rolls in the last month, according to a report released Friday. The report said 376,850 people in the state have gained coverage under the federal-state program for the low-income since the exchange launched a year ago under the federal Affordable Care Act. Another 2,425 people bought private insurance plans in the last month, though the open enrollment period is closed.
NEWS
November 20, 2009
Parents interested in having their children participate in the Johns Hopkins University Center for Talented Youth have until Nov. 30 to enroll them. The program is for bright students in second through eighth grades. The students must take tests, offered locally, to qualify them for CTY's summer or online courses for academically gifted students. Financial aid is available for children eligible for the free- and reduced-price lunch program. Information can be found by e-mailing ctyinfo@jhu.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2010
Enrollment at Anne Arundel Community College has increased 5 percent for the fall semester. And with more students on campus, there are more traffic and parking headaches as well as a premium on class space. Students have flooded community colleges during the nation's economic downturn, looking for bargain-rate classes to burnish their resumes. In addition to adding more online courses to deal with the influx, AACC has begun offering classes in the middle of the night. Still, the college turns away more than 200 qualified students to its nursing trainee program each year, though the school has worked to more efficiently manage professors' schedules to accommodate more students.
NEWS
By Larry Carson | larry.carson@baltsun.com | February 22, 2010
By the start of classes in August 2011, white students in Howard County are expected to be a minority, joining those in Baltimore County. The two school systems are riding a demographic wave that carries broad implications for how students are taught. Baltimore County two years ago joined Baltimore City and Montgomery, Prince George's, Charles and Somerset counties as Maryland jurisdictions where minorities outnumber white students in public schools, although the development was little noticed at the time.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | November 15, 2013
More than 1,700 Marylanders had enrolled in health insurance coverage through a new state marketplace from Oct. 1 through Nov. 9, and of those who signed up in October, most were women and middle-aged, state health officials said. The enrollment total was a 36 percent increase in a week. Along with its weekly update of enrollment and application processing numbers, Maryland Health Connection released demographic information on early enrollees for the first time. Women made up 55 percent of the enrollees.
NEWS
September 15, 1991
Anne Arundel Community College recently reported that 1991 summer enrollment set a new record at the school.Enrollment reached a final count of 4,161 students, up by 188 over the 1990 summer term. The college offered the same number of courses this summer and last, but added class sections to accommodate demand for courses in fields such as English.
NEWS
Erica L. Green | December 19, 2013
Baltimore school officials may have to cut the city government a $2.9 million check after the school system provided inflated enrollment numbers for the city's payment to the district last year. According to city officials, the school district reported that 79,849 students were to be funded in the city's annual per-pupil contribution to schools, known as the maintenance of effort, when the number should have been 78,871. The 978-pupil discrepancy, which threw off the per-pupil expenditure by $30 per-student, could have cost the city millions, officials said.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn and The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2014
A day after Maryland committed to a gradual launch of its health exchange, state officials are still working out some key details — including where the opening day sign-up will be held — but experts say it could be a way to avoid a repeat of last year's botched rollout.  Several health experts said the approach that limits enrollment in the first few days could allow Maryland to "kick the tires" on its new website. "It's a controlled way to open enrollment," said Karen Pollitz, senior fellow at the Kaiser Family Foundation.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2014
Seven years after the University of Baltimore admitted its first freshman class, new President Kurt L. Schmoke is considering a return to the school's roots as an upper-division college that enrolled only juniors and seniors. The enrollment growth that came with the first underclassmen in 2007 has stagnated. UB enrolls about 200 freshmen each fall, and the university still attracts mostly transfers and graduate students. In an interview Friday, Schmoke spoke of flat public funding and a need to work more efficiently.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | August 19, 2014
Maryland health exchange officials plan to contact every person who bought one of their insurance plans last year to get them to re-enroll in November. Most of the nearly 79,000 people who gained private coverage in the state under the Affordable Care Act were subsidized, and they will lose that benefit if they don't sign back up manually. Most people who do nothing will be automatically re-enrolled in the same or equivalent plans, according to Dr. Joshua M. Sharfstein, state health secretary and chairman of the exchange board.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2014
The Maryland health exchange reported Friday that more than 411,000 people had signed up for health insurance as of July 26, up more than 38,000 from a month ago. Open enrollment on the online marketplace is closed, but those who lost their coverage, got married or have another life event were still eligible to sign up. Also, those who qualify for Medicaid are allowed to sign up year-round. Most of those who gained coverage enrolled in Medicaid. The number reflects some who also were dropped from the program because they no longer qualify.
SPORTS
Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2014
Trayvon Reed's career as a Maryland basketball player has ended before it even began, after his arrest Wednesday night in College Park caused the athletic department to prohibit him from enrolling in classes. In a brief statement released Friday by the athletic department, Maryland men's coach Mark Turgeon said “Trayvon failed to meet the standards that are required by the university athletics department.” When reached by telephone, Turgeon declined to comment on the charges pending against the 7-foot-1 center, including second-degree assault, second degree assault of a police officer, theft under $100 and resisting arrest.
NEWS
BY KRISHANA DAVIS, kdavis@baltsun.com | June 27, 2014
Over the last six years, enrollment in Advance Placement testing across Harford County Public Schools has increased, but that increase has not necessarily translated into more students passing the exams. Students who pass Advanced Placement exams are afforded by many colleges and universities the option of skipping a comparable college level course, or receiving college credit for the course or both, so AP programs are often regarded as giving college-bound high school students a jump on collegiate academics.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | March 15, 2014
I haven't visited Health Insurance Hell for a while, so I thought I'd stop and see how things are going. It's not so bad: At least 4.2 million new enrollees through federal and state Obamacare websites, with at least 1 million more expected through March 31, the deadline for getting insurance and avoiding a tax penalty. So, not as good as projected, but hardly the disaster Republicans keep saying it is. In addition to the federal Healthcare.gov, the state health insurance exchanges have picked up steam, too. As NPR reported: "The [state]
NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | March 7, 2014
"HealthConnectNow!" will be at the Bel Air library, 100 E. Pennsylvania Ave., Sunday from 1 to 5 p.m. to enroll uninsured Marylanders in health coverage through Maryland Health Connection. The health fair is one in a series of events being held throughout Maryland sponsored by the state's health insurance marketplace to inform individual and families about their health coverage options under the federal Affordable Care Act and help them obtain health coverage before the March 31 deadline for open enrollment.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | May 16, 2014
The Maryland health exchange reported that more than 343,000 people have gained coverage through the online marketplace as of May 10, including some people who reported having trouble with the website and signed up after the official enrollment period ended. Those enrolling in private plans reached 67,907, up about 150 people in the last month. Open enrollment ended March 31, though people who said they tried and failed to sign up were given more time and those whose work or family status changed can sign up year-round.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker and The Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2014
Maryland bulked up on offensive linemen during the last recruiting period, but one of its targets won't be attending school in the fall. Larry Mazyck, a junior college transfer, did not meet necessary academic standards and won't be enrolling, according to multiple sources. Mazyck is listed at 6 feet 8 inches and 340 pounds. He attended Washington's Friendship Collegiate and, later, Iowa Western Community College. Maryland's incoming class includes top offensive line target Damian Prince (Bishop McNamara)
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