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By TIM SMITH and TIM SMITH,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | July 23, 2006
It's easy to perform Verdi's Il Trovatore, Enrico Caruso said: "All you need is the four greatest singers in the world." Even if you do manage to bring together such a quartet for a Trovatore production, success isn't assured. The opera, with its abundance of catchy tunes and a famously troublesome plot, requires a huge dose of that elusive quality known as style - enough to make each musical phrase and every twist in the story meaningful. IL TROVATORE -- To be performed today at 2:30 p.m. -- Hartke Theatre, Catholic University, 3801 Harewood Road N.E., Washington -- Limited ticket availability: 202-319-4000
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By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,sun reporter | September 8, 2007
In Luciano Pavarotti's foreword to Ponselle: A Singer's Life, published by Doubleday in 1982, he wrote that when he was growing up in Modena, Italy, he could "hardly remember a time when the name Rosa Ponselle was unfamiliar to me." Pavarotti, who died this week, wrote that her recordings "assured her of immortality," and as a young boy alto, he was urged to "listen to them, note by note, one after the other." In the early 1970s, Pavarotti and the great Metropolitan Opera Company diva began a telephone-and-letter friendship that culminated in 1977 when the operatic tenor visited Villa Pace, her Green Spring Valley home.
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FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | February 17, 1994
The troubled romantic life of famed opera tenor Enrico Caruso can be traced through a life insurance policy he purchased in 1903; the original certificate was donated yesterday to the archives of the Peabody Institute.Caruso, who died in 1921 at the age of 47, originally designated his mistress, Ada Giachetti, as beneficiary of the policy taken out for 100,000 lire. Their relationship was well-known, and she was the mother of his two sons, Adolfo and Enrico Jr.But in 1908 Caruso changed the policy to name just his sons, says Elizabeth Schaaf, Peabody archivist.
NEWS
By TIM SMITH and TIM SMITH,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | July 23, 2006
It's easy to perform Verdi's Il Trovatore, Enrico Caruso said: "All you need is the four greatest singers in the world." Even if you do manage to bring together such a quartet for a Trovatore production, success isn't assured. The opera, with its abundance of catchy tunes and a famously troublesome plot, requires a huge dose of that elusive quality known as style - enough to make each musical phrase and every twist in the story meaningful. IL TROVATORE -- To be performed today at 2:30 p.m. -- Hartke Theatre, Catholic University, 3801 Harewood Road N.E., Washington -- Limited ticket availability: 202-319-4000
NEWS
June 29, 1993
After what was by all accounts a phenomenal performance Saturday before a crowd of 500,000 in New York's Central Park, opera superstar Luciano Pavarotti is entitled to borrow Mark Twain's legendary retort to the press: "Reports of my death have been greatly exaggerated."The Italian tenor hadn't been pronounced dead, exactly, but much of the reportage concerning him recently has strongly implied his stage career is nearing its end. For an opera singer, that's akin to having one foot in the grave.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,sun reporter | September 8, 2007
In Luciano Pavarotti's foreword to Ponselle: A Singer's Life, published by Doubleday in 1982, he wrote that when he was growing up in Modena, Italy, he could "hardly remember a time when the name Rosa Ponselle was unfamiliar to me." Pavarotti, who died this week, wrote that her recordings "assured her of immortality," and as a young boy alto, he was urged to "listen to them, note by note, one after the other." In the early 1970s, Pavarotti and the great Metropolitan Opera Company diva began a telephone-and-letter friendship that culminated in 1977 when the operatic tenor visited Villa Pace, her Green Spring Valley home.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | June 30, 2000
The Open-Air Film Festival in Little Italy has been another big success this year, according to an organizer of the summer-long event. "We've gotten off to a very good start," said Tom Kiefaber, owner of the Senator Theatre. The festival kicked off with a program of short films by Martin Scorsese, and "raised a few eyebrows," Kiefaber said, "but generally we're getting a good response." The Senator sponsors the festival with the Little Italy Restaurant Association (LIRA). Tonight's offering, "Moonstruck," was a huge favorite last year, so Kiefaber advises filmgoers to get there early.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 26, 1996
Combine the greatest stories ever told with some of the greatest music ever written, and what do you get?That question will be answered at 3 p.m. Sunday at Annapolis' Kneseth Israel Synagogue when the Annapolis Opera presents "Opera from Moses to the Inquisition," a program of arias from operas inspired by the Bible.Verdi's "Nabucco" (Nebuchadnezzar), Saint-Saens' "Samson et Delila" and Halevy's "La Juive" are just a few of the operas that will be excerpted at Sunday's musicale.Soprano Kay Krekow, soon to join the roster of the Prague Opera, will be in the spotlight along with Michael Begley, the Annapolis Opera's producer and resident baritone.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler | September 26, 1997
Luciano Pavarotti praised her as "the Queen of Queens in all of singing." Maria Callas called her "simply the greatest singer of us all." Montserrat Caballe said: "My favorite singer? Rosa Ponselle!"A now legendary superstar, Ponselle, the first truly great American dramatic soprano, would have been 100 years old this year. She'll be remembered and honored in two extraordinary memorial events this weekend -- near her mausoleum in Druid Ridge Cemetery, Pikesville, at 4 p.m. tomorrow, and in a memorial concert at 4 p.m. Sunday in Murphy Auditorium at Morgan State University.
FEATURES
By John Ardoin and John Ardoin,Dallas Morning News | November 28, 1990
As long as there have been commercial recordings, and as long as there have been catalogs to detail them, Enrico Caruso has been a formidable force. There have been Caruso recordings on cylinders, discs and tapes. The discs have spun at 78 rpm, 45 rpm and 33 1/3 rpm. And they are tracked by a laserbeam on compact disc.Just in time for Christmas, RCA Victor, the principal custodian of the Caruso legacy, has issued 12 CDs that encompass every surviving note the great Italian tenor recorded (60495-2-RG)
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | June 30, 2000
The Open-Air Film Festival in Little Italy has been another big success this year, according to an organizer of the summer-long event. "We've gotten off to a very good start," said Tom Kiefaber, owner of the Senator Theatre. The festival kicked off with a program of short films by Martin Scorsese, and "raised a few eyebrows," Kiefaber said, "but generally we're getting a good response." The Senator sponsors the festival with the Little Italy Restaurant Association (LIRA). Tonight's offering, "Moonstruck," was a huge favorite last year, so Kiefaber advises filmgoers to get there early.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | February 17, 1994
The troubled romantic life of famed opera tenor Enrico Caruso can be traced through a life insurance policy he purchased in 1903; the original certificate was donated yesterday to the archives of the Peabody Institute.Caruso, who died in 1921 at the age of 47, originally designated his mistress, Ada Giachetti, as beneficiary of the policy taken out for 100,000 lire. Their relationship was well-known, and she was the mother of his two sons, Adolfo and Enrico Jr.But in 1908 Caruso changed the policy to name just his sons, says Elizabeth Schaaf, Peabody archivist.
NEWS
June 29, 1993
After what was by all accounts a phenomenal performance Saturday before a crowd of 500,000 in New York's Central Park, opera superstar Luciano Pavarotti is entitled to borrow Mark Twain's legendary retort to the press: "Reports of my death have been greatly exaggerated."The Italian tenor hadn't been pronounced dead, exactly, but much of the reportage concerning him recently has strongly implied his stage career is nearing its end. For an opera singer, that's akin to having one foot in the grave.
NEWS
December 20, 1999
Desmond Llewelyn,85, who starred as the eccentric gadget expert Q in a string of James Bond films, was killed in a head-on car crash yesterday near the town of Firle in East Sussex, England, police said.He was best known for his role as Q, who equipped 007 with the latest spy tools -- from toxic fountain pens to exploding toothpaste -- in 17 Bond films from 1963's "From Russia with Love" to the current film "The World Is Not Enough."Over the years, Q grew fond of Bond but could never forgive him for abusing his inventions.
NEWS
May 15, 2002
UNDOUBTEDLY, Luciano Pavarotti will sing again. But his last-minute withdrawal from Saturday's appearance at the Metropolitan Opera trumpets the inevitable: The long reign of the "King of the high C's" is over. The Met's general manager, Joseph Volpe, certainly understood the significance of the moment. "This is a hell of a way to end a beautiful career," he reportedly told the tenor, who had flip-flopped for hours about whether to sing. Was Mr. Pavarotti truly too ill to sing before 3,000 spectators, some of whom had paid $1,500 for their tickets?
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