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Enriched Uranium

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NEWS
By Barbara Demick and Barbara Demick,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 3, 2004
SEOUL, South Korea - The United Nations nuclear watchdog agency is investigating an incident in which South Korean scientists at a large government research institute secretly experimented with highly enriched uranium, nuclear material that could be used in making a bomb. Although only a minuscule amount of uranium was involved, the revelation could prove highly embarrassing to South Korea and highly awkward for the United States as it wrestles with the nuclear ambitions of North Korea and Iran.
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NEWS
October 7, 2013
President Barack Obama's critics lost no time in calling him naive for welcoming talks offered by Iran's president aimed at reducing tensions between their two countries over Tehran's disputed nuclear program. Israeli President Benjamin Netanyahu was outspoken in his disdain for the diplomatic initiative launched at the United Nations last month by Iranian President Hasan Rowhani, calling him a wolf in sheep's clothing who only wants to bargain in order to buy more time for Iran to build a bomb.
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BUSINESS
By Bloomberg News | April 22, 2008
The U.S. Supreme Court agreed yesterday to hear arguments from the Bush administration and USEC Inc. in a fight over anti-dumping duties imposed on enriched uranium imported by France's Areva SA. The justices said they will review a federal appeals court decision that said Areva in at least some cases provides a service, not a product. The U.S. anti-dumping law doesn't apply to services. A high court decision allowing the duties would be a boon for USEC, the only U.S. company that enriches uranium.
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg News | April 22, 2008
The U.S. Supreme Court agreed yesterday to hear arguments from the Bush administration and USEC Inc. in a fight over anti-dumping duties imposed on enriched uranium imported by France's Areva SA. The justices said they will review a federal appeals court decision that said Areva in at least some cases provides a service, not a product. The U.S. anti-dumping law doesn't apply to services. A high court decision allowing the duties would be a boon for USEC, the only U.S. company that enriches uranium.
NEWS
By Ramin Mostaghim and Borzou Daragahi and Ramin Mostaghim and Borzou Daragahi,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 9, 2008
TEHRAN, Iran -- Iran has begun to triple its capacity to enrich uranium, a process that can produce fuel for nuclear weapons or power plants, President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad announced yesterday on state television. Iran has about 3,000 centrifuges operating, according to international inspectors, and Ahmadinejad said his country had begun installing 6,000 more. Arms control experts estimate that 3,000 centrifuges, operating continuously for one year, can produce enough highly enriched uranium for one nuclear bomb.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 25, 2006
PARIS -- International nuclear inspectors are expected to report next week that Iran has started producing enriched uranium on a very small scale, indicating that it is striving to solve technological problems in its nuclear program, European officials said yesterday. A month after Iran defied Europe and the International Atomic Energy Agency and said it would restart what it termed research on enrichment, it has put 10 centrifuges into operation at the vast uranium-enrichment plant at Natanz, the officials said.
NEWS
By Alissa J. Rubin and Alissa J. Rubin,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 15, 2006
SANCERRE, FRANCE -- Iran has slowly but steadily increased its ability to enrich uranium despite international calls to halt its nuclear activities, experts at the International Atomic Energy Agency say in a report released yesterday. The report, which became public in advance of a meeting next week by the U.N. watchdog agency's board of governors, emphasized that Iran's failure to answer questions about its nuclear activities made it impossible for the IAEA "to confirm the peaceful nature of Iran's program."
NEWS
By Graham Allison | July 2, 2007
Before 9/11, most Americans found the idea that international terrorists could mount an attack on their homeland and kill thousands of innocent citizens not merely unlikely but inconceivable. After nearly six years without a second attack on U.S. soil, some skeptics suggest that 9/11 was a 100-year flood. The view that terrorists are preparing even more deadly assaults seems as far-fetched to them as the possibility of terrorists crashing passenger jets into the World Trade Center did before that fateful Tuesday morning in 2001.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 30, 2003
LONDON - The top United Nations nuclear inspector, Mohamed ElBaradei, said yesterday that Libya's nuclear program was years away from producing a nuclear weapon and was now largely dismantled and stored in boxes. But ElBaradei, who spoke in Libya after visiting four previously undeclared sites where scientists had been working to perfect the enrichment of uranium, expressed surprise that Libya had acquired a great deal of high-technology equipment needed to enrich uranium through black-market transactions that have yet to be disclosed.
NEWS
By Daniel Poneman | August 10, 2004
TAKEN TOGETHER, the 9/11 commission report and the recent Senate Intelligence Committee report on Iraq teach us how incomplete intelligence can lead us to exaggerate some threats and miss others. This suggests that where the mists of uncertainty part to reveal an unambiguous threat to our national security, we must confront it squarely. We now face such an unambiguous threat from North Korea. How do we know? Because we have lost track of five to six atomic bombs' worth of plutonium there.
NEWS
By Ramin Mostaghim and Borzou Daragahi and Ramin Mostaghim and Borzou Daragahi,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 9, 2008
TEHRAN, Iran -- Iran has begun to triple its capacity to enrich uranium, a process that can produce fuel for nuclear weapons or power plants, President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad announced yesterday on state television. Iran has about 3,000 centrifuges operating, according to international inspectors, and Ahmadinejad said his country had begun installing 6,000 more. Arms control experts estimate that 3,000 centrifuges, operating continuously for one year, can produce enough highly enriched uranium for one nuclear bomb.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | March 4, 2008
UNITED NATIONS -- The U.N. Security Council adopted yesterday its third resolution imposing sanctions on Iran for its refusal to cease enriching uranium, an activity that Western nations say is designed to build nuclear weapons. The previous two measures gained unanimous support of the 15-member panel, but in yesterday's balloting, Indonesia abstained, saying it "remained to be convinced of the efficacy of adopting additional sanctions at this juncture." Fourteen countries voted in favor.
NEWS
By Graham Allison | July 2, 2007
Before 9/11, most Americans found the idea that international terrorists could mount an attack on their homeland and kill thousands of innocent citizens not merely unlikely but inconceivable. After nearly six years without a second attack on U.S. soil, some skeptics suggest that 9/11 was a 100-year flood. The view that terrorists are preparing even more deadly assaults seems as far-fetched to them as the possibility of terrorists crashing passenger jets into the World Trade Center did before that fateful Tuesday morning in 2001.
NEWS
By Bob Drogin and Bob Drogin,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 23, 2007
VIENNA -- Iran has accelerated its program to enrich uranium and defied a U.N. Security Council deadline to suspend nuclear activities before Tehran is capable of producing fuel for nuclear weapons, the U.N. nuclear watchdog agency said here yesterday. The report by Mohamed ElBaradei, head of the International Atomic Energy Agency, confirmed that Iran recently began installing the first of 3,000 gas centrifuges in a heavily fortified, underground chamber at Natanz and that it plans to "bring them gradually into operation by May 2007."
NEWS
By James Gerstenzang and James Gerstenzang,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 8, 2006
WASHINGTON -- President Bush, responding to a scathing bipartisan assessment of the Iraq war, rejected the idea that deteriorating conditions there require the United States to scale back its goals. He said yesterday that he remains committed to "victory in Iraq." "I thought we would succeed quicker than we did, and I am disappointed by the pace of success," Bush said at a joint White House news conference with British Prime Minister Tony Blair. But he declared, "I also believe we're going to succeed.
NEWS
By Alissa J. Rubin and Alissa J. Rubin,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 15, 2006
SANCERRE, FRANCE -- Iran has slowly but steadily increased its ability to enrich uranium despite international calls to halt its nuclear activities, experts at the International Atomic Energy Agency say in a report released yesterday. The report, which became public in advance of a meeting next week by the U.N. watchdog agency's board of governors, emphasized that Iran's failure to answer questions about its nuclear activities made it impossible for the IAEA "to confirm the peaceful nature of Iran's program."
NEWS
By JOHN DANISZEWSKI and JOHN DANISZEWSKI,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 12, 2006
LONDON -- British Prime Minister Tony Blair said yesterday that Iran should be brought before the United Nations Security Council for defying the international community and resuming research on enriching uranium, a move some Western leaders fear is a step toward the construction of nuclear weapons. The statement came as the United States and its chief European allies seemed to be moving toward agreement to address the issue of Iran's nuclear program at the United Nations, rather than by continuing the multilateral negotiations that Britain, France and Germany have been conducting with Iran for the past two years.
NEWS
By MAGGIE FARLEY AND ALISSA J. RUBIN and MAGGIE FARLEY AND ALISSA J. RUBIN,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 29, 2006
UNITED NATIONS -- The U.N. nuclear watchdog agency said yesterday that Iran has continued to defy a Security Council call for a freeze on its efforts to enrich uranium, setting up a showdown between the international community and the Islamic republic. The Security Council will meet Wednesday to begin consideration of a resolution legally requiring Iran to halt enrichment activities that could also be used to make bomb-grade uranium, and to address long-unanswered questions about the possible military applications of its nuclear program.
NEWS
By MAGGIE FARLEY AND ALISSA J. RUBIN and MAGGIE FARLEY AND ALISSA J. RUBIN,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 29, 2006
UNITED NATIONS -- The U.N. nuclear watchdog agency said yesterday that Iran has continued to defy a Security Council call for a freeze on its efforts to enrich uranium, setting up a showdown between the international community and the Islamic republic. The Security Council will meet Wednesday to begin consideration of a resolution legally requiring Iran to halt enrichment activities that could also be used to make bomb-grade uranium, and to address long-unanswered questions about the possible military applications of its nuclear program.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 25, 2006
PARIS -- International nuclear inspectors are expected to report next week that Iran has started producing enriched uranium on a very small scale, indicating that it is striving to solve technological problems in its nuclear program, European officials said yesterday. A month after Iran defied Europe and the International Atomic Energy Agency and said it would restart what it termed research on enrichment, it has put 10 centrifuges into operation at the vast uranium-enrichment plant at Natanz, the officials said.
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