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Enoch Pratt Hospital

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By LAURA LIPPMAN and LAURA LIPPMAN,SUN STAFF | October 19, 1995
The first time Bobby Ojeda saw Sheppard and Enoch Pratt Hospital, it wasn't at all what he expected. The mix of old and new buildings on the wooded hillside looked imposing to him, like something out of a Hollywood movie. It could have been a fancy private school, or a small college.But they don't send you to private school when you're a major league baseball pitcher struggling to get over seeing two teammates killed in a boating accident. Mr. Ojeda came to Sheppard Pratt in July 1993 because he had survived, but still wasn't living.
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By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 15, 2014
Dr. Robert W. Gibson, a seminal figure for more than three decades at the Sheppard and Enoch Pratt Hospital where he oversaw the desegregation of its facilities, ended its bankruptcy and extended it into the community, died March 8 of heart failure at his Parkton home. He was 89. "Bob was a major leader in American psychiatry and not just at Sheppard Pratt or in Maryland. He devoted his life to Sheppard Pratt for more than 30 years and was really a remarkable leader," said Dr. Steve Sharfstein who succeeded Dr. Gibson in 1992 as president of what is now Sheppard Pratt Health System.
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NEWS
March 12, 1996
Benjamin Scott Garris, the teen-ager awaiting a murder trial in the death of a Sheppard and Enoch Pratt Hospital counselor, has been charged with battery in an alleged sexual offense at the county Detention Center, police and court records show.But police said yesterday that they were seeking the withdrawal of the warrant, which was issued Friday by a District Court commissioner based on allegations by a Detention Center inmate. Capt. Brian A. Uppercue, a police spokesman, said that because it charged a juvenile with a misdemeanor, the warrant was issued in error.
NEWS
June 17, 2007
Jerome Styrt, a Baltimore psychiatrist who had a private practice and supervised psychiatry students at several area hospitals, died June 10 of pneumonia stemming from complications after a hip fracture at Keswick Multi-Care Center in Baltimore. The Roland Park resident was 87. Dr. Styrt was born and raised in Chicago and earned his bachelor's degree in chemistry the University of Chicago. His colleagues at the University of Chicago Clinics encouraged him to go to medical school. He earned his medical degree in 1945 from the University of Chicago School of Medicine, and went on to a residency at the Sheppard and Enoch Pratt Hospital in Towson.
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BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | September 2, 1998
The 17-year-old girl who supplied the knife used in the 1995 killing of a Sheppard and Enoch Pratt Hospital counselor was returned to Baltimore County and ordered held without bail last night on charges she violated probation last week by fleeing from her parents' house in Timonium.Jane Frances DeCosta was found Monday in Washington after a six-day search. She was transported yesterday to the Women's Detention Center.DeCosta will have a hearing in county Circuit Court on the status of her probation, which she received for taking part in the 1995 killing of Sharon Edwards.
NEWS
June 28, 1998
Christine Ann Bamberger, a former mental health worker at Sheppard and Enoch Pratt Hospital and Carroll County General Hospital, died Tuesday of a gastrointestinal disease at the Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care in Towson. The Westminster resident was 36.A Baltimore native, Miss Bamberger attended Villa Julie College and held various jobs before going to work at Sheppard Pratt in the early 1990s. She worked at Carroll County General from about 1994 until failing health forced her to retire in 1996.
NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 19, 2005
Most people would view the completion of Sheppard and Enoch Pratt Hospital's $90 million construction and renovation project as its big news. The grand opening of the 240,000-square-foot new hospital building is hard to top. But those trusted with its 148-year legacy have not forgotten its roots. And, they plan to make sure others don't either. W. Byron Forbush II, chairman of the board of trustees, is spearheading efforts to continue to document the history of the facility and to create a museum commemorating the life of its founder, Moses Sheppard, and the asylum he funded.
FEATURES
By Fred Rasmussen | July 28, 1991
From The Sun July 28-Aug. 3, 1841July 30: The Mayor of Frederick has issued a proclamation declaring war against the dogs and the work of destruction has )) commenced. Oh, that we could say as much of Baltimore.Aug. 3: Three women and two men of the genus loafer, to whose shame no addition would be made by the publication of their names, were yesterday sent to the alms-house by Justice Pennington as vagrants.From The Sun July 28-Aug. 3, 1891July 31: The corner-stone of the new Odd Fellows' Hall, corner Saratoga and Cathedral Streets, was laid in the presence of 2,000 persons yesterday afternoon.
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By Johnathon E. Briggs and Johnathon E. Briggs,SUN STAFF | December 10, 2000
An Annapolis man who crashed his car in an apparent attempt to kill his wife has been found guilty - but not criminally responsible - on one count of attempted second-degree murder. Douglas D. Lund, 36, of the first block of Colonial Ave. was charged in the Sept. 7, 1999, incident in which police said he banged his wife's head into the pavement after he intentionally released her seat belt and crashed their car into a metal fence and barrier near the State House. He carried his wife, Amy, toward the College Creek Bridge and put her on the grass before flagging down a vehicle for help, police said.
NEWS
By Kris Antonelli and Kris Antonelli,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Suzanne Loudermilk contributed to this article | May 8, 1997
Lawyers for Sheppard and Enoch Pratt Hospital and the family of Sharon Edwards -- the woman slain while working as a counselor at the hospital in 1995 -- have settled a $10 million negligence lawsuit against the Towson psychiatric institution in a confidential agreement."
NEWS
By David Kohn and David Kohn,SUN STAFF | July 8, 2005
For the 15th straight year, Johns Hopkins Hospital has earned the top spot in U.S. News & World Report's list of the best American hospitals. When the streak began, Ray Lewis was an unknown Florida teenager; Cal Ripken was a 29-year-old everyday shortstop; and Kurt Schmoke was mayor. The magazine's annual rankings, released today, put the East Baltimore institution first in five specialties: ear, nose and throat; gynecology; kidney disease (up from No. 2 last year); rheumatology; and urology.
NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 19, 2005
Most people would view the completion of Sheppard and Enoch Pratt Hospital's $90 million construction and renovation project as its big news. The grand opening of the 240,000-square-foot new hospital building is hard to top. But those trusted with its 148-year legacy have not forgotten its roots. And, they plan to make sure others don't either. W. Byron Forbush II, chairman of the board of trustees, is spearheading efforts to continue to document the history of the facility and to create a museum commemorating the life of its founder, Moses Sheppard, and the asylum he funded.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | March 31, 2005
Charles Edmund Scott, a former human resources director at Sheppard and Enoch Pratt Hospital who was active in volunteer emergency medical services and Harford County civic affairs, died of pancreatitis March 24 at University of Maryland Medical Center. The Abingdon resident was 71. Born in Baltimore and raised in Catonsville, he was a 1952 graduate of Catonsville High School and played varsity baseball. He earned a Bachelor of Science degree in business management at the University of Baltimore, also playing on its baseball team.
NEWS
By Reginald Fields and Reginald Fields,SUN STAFF | May 9, 2004
Dr. Gerald A. Whitmarsh, past president of the Maryland Psychological Association's board of directors whose career as a psychologist in the Towson area spanned four decades, died of respiratory failure Wednesday at the Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. The Towson resident was 72. Dr. Whitmarsh was working as a psychologist for the Maryland State Disability Determination Services at the time of his death. He also worked for 33 years at Sheppard and Enoch Pratt Hospital, ran a private practice in Towson for 35 years, performed consulting work, and taught at the Johns Hopkins University and University of Maryland.
NEWS
By David Kohn and David Kohn,SUN STAFF | July 18, 2003
Thirteen was a lucky number yesterday for Johns Hopkins Hospital: For the 13th consecutive year, it earned top honors in U.S. News and World Report's annual list of the nation's best hospitals. Published on the magazine's Web site last night and in next week's issue of the magazine, the rankings have become a kind of Academy Awards for the nation's hospitals, a quick and well-known guide to gauge an institution's reputation and quality of care. "Obviously, we're delighted. We think it reflects the team effort from our administrators, physicians, nurses and support staff," said Johns Hopkins spokesman Gary Stephenson.
NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | December 6, 2001
Construction of six apartment buildings for Towson University students has begun on the grounds of Sheppard and Enoch Pratt Hospital, ushering in a new era for the 110-year-old campus. The $23 million project reflects a change in thinking at Sheppard Pratt, which has begun selling off pockets of its 100 acres for development. In addition to the 13.7 acres where the luxury apartments will sit, the not-for-profit hospital on Charles Street recently sold 14.5 acres to GBMC Healthcare Inc., parent company of Greater Baltimore Medical Center, which plans to build a medical pavilion.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | March 31, 2005
Charles Edmund Scott, a former human resources director at Sheppard and Enoch Pratt Hospital who was active in volunteer emergency medical services and Harford County civic affairs, died of pancreatitis March 24 at University of Maryland Medical Center. The Abingdon resident was 71. Born in Baltimore and raised in Catonsville, he was a 1952 graduate of Catonsville High School and played varsity baseball. He earned a Bachelor of Science degree in business management at the University of Baltimore, also playing on its baseball team.
NEWS
By Reginald Fields and Reginald Fields,SUN STAFF | May 9, 2004
Dr. Gerald A. Whitmarsh, past president of the Maryland Psychological Association's board of directors whose career as a psychologist in the Towson area spanned four decades, died of respiratory failure Wednesday at the Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. The Towson resident was 72. Dr. Whitmarsh was working as a psychologist for the Maryland State Disability Determination Services at the time of his death. He also worked for 33 years at Sheppard and Enoch Pratt Hospital, ran a private practice in Towson for 35 years, performed consulting work, and taught at the Johns Hopkins University and University of Maryland.
NEWS
By Johnathon E. Briggs and Johnathon E. Briggs,SUN STAFF | December 10, 2000
An Annapolis man who crashed his car in an apparent attempt to kill his wife has been found guilty - but not criminally responsible - on one count of attempted second-degree murder. Douglas D. Lund, 36, of the first block of Colonial Ave. was charged in the Sept. 7, 1999, incident in which police said he banged his wife's head into the pavement after he intentionally released her seat belt and crashed their car into a metal fence and barrier near the State House. He carried his wife, Amy, toward the College Creek Bridge and put her on the grass before flagging down a vehicle for help, police said.
NEWS
November 29, 2000
Anne W. Taliaferro, 81 occupational therapist Anne W. Taliaferro, a retired occupational therapist and avid gardener, died Sunday of respiratory failure at her daughter's home in Oxford, Pa. She was 81 and lived in Stoneleigh. Mrs. Taliaferro retired in the mid-1980s from Sheppard and Enoch Pratt Hospital, where she had worked in the occupational therapy department. Born Anne Weyrich in Baltimore, she was raised in Windsor Hills and South Amboy, N.J. She graduated in 1937 from the Bryn Mawr School in Baltimore and earned her bachelor's degree in occupational therapy from Columbia University.
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