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By Ruma Kumar and Ruma Kumar,Sun Reporter | April 1, 2007
War was Lloyd Brown's chance to get out of the Ozarks. It was 1918. The 16-year-old Missouri boy lied about his age to get into the Navy. Before he knew it, he was on the gun crew on the battleship USS New Hampshire, climbing 50-foot-tall masts, peering into the waters of the Atlantic for German U-boats and helping capture one. Mr. Brown, the last surviving Navy veteran of World War I, died Thursday at the Charlotte Hall Veterans Home in St. Mary's County....
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NEWS
August 14, 2014
City police officials have replaced the department's homicide chief in the wake of a string of unsolved murders this summer that shattered what had been a period of relative calm. Maj. Stanley Brandford will take over the homicide unit from Maj. Dennis Smith, who had been running homicide along with the shooting and robbery divisions since April. Putting the unit under separate command is probably the right move given the outsized role homicides play in shaping perceptions of Baltimore.
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NEWS
October 24, 1995
A photo caption in Sunday's editions incorrectly characterized the commissioning of the USS Stethem. It is not the first U.S. Navy vessel named after an enlisted sailor.The Sun regrets the errors.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | February 27, 2014
Growing up, when Alex Pownall watched his father, he saw a man who loved his job. John Pownall has served 20 years in the military, the last 12 as a recruiter for the Maryland National Guard. He was sent to defend Andrews Air Force Base after the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, and advised the Afghan National Army in 2011 and 2012. "He looked forward to drill, and he came home happy," Alex Pownall said. So when Alex turned 17 last year, he needed no convincing. He joined the Maryland National Guard in October and is waiting to finish high school so he can go to boot camp.
NEWS
October 22, 1995
A photo caption in Sunday's editions incorrectly characterized the commissioning of the USS Stethem. It is not the first U.S. Navy vessel named after an enlisted sailor.+ The Sun regrets the errors.
NEWS
By DONALD R. MORRIS | February 12, 1991
Until the outbreak of the second World War, enlisted men were essentially nameless and faceless; officers, while entitled to more social respect, were also faceless -- until they reached flag rank, or broke aviation records.You could turn the services upside down and shake them without finding a married man under the rank of sergeant; they were blue-collar workers and, in time of war, cannon-fodder -- in all nations.Until Pearl Harbor, junior officers were forbidden by law to marry for five years after commissioning.
NEWS
By Scott S. Sheads and Scott S. Sheads,Park ranger, Fort McHenry National Monument * I met Percy Laven Julian at a biomedical conference in New Orleans, where he was the keynote speaker. I was chemistry chairman at Coppin State College. He talked for more than an hour. When he was a young scientist, he told us, he had to prove himself every step of the way. Those were the days when whites viewed a black person through jaundiced eyes. Many a time Dr. Julian had to endure abject humiliation. Hotels refused to admit him, even though they had confirmed his reservation by telephone. After the speech, we invited him to speak in Baltimore. He accepted, and we made the arrangements, but on the day before he was to arrive, Dr. Julian suffered a massive heart attack. He never recovered from it. Dr. Julian's synthesis of the drug physostigmine, used in the treatment of glaucoma, attracted considerable attention in scientific circles, and in the early 1930s he became director of research of the soya product division of the Glidden Co. in Chicago. Some of the products synthesized by Dr. Julian reduced the cost of therapy for many diseases, most notably arthritis. In 1953, he established his own firm, Julian Laboratories Inc., and a sister company, Laboratories Julian de Mexico. He was the author of 162 scientific publications and had 105 patents. He was awarded 15 honorary degrees. Bail L. RaoRetired professor of chemistry, Coppin State College * William Edward Burghardt DuBois and Booker Taliaferro Washington were towering fighters for freedom and equality of opportunity for black Americans. They differed in philosophy and methodology. Booker T. Washington followed the route of accommodation. In an address at the Atlanta Exposition in 1895, Dr. Washington said, "The wisest among my race understand that the agitation of questions of social equality is the extremist folly . . ." He was, of course, lionized by white leaders for what came to be known as the "Atlanta Compromise." Dr. DuBois and other black leaders denounced Washington for eschewing political and social equality. He was said to have sold his people out (much as Justice Clarence Thomas was to be accused more than a century later). "The American Negro demands equality," Dr. DuBois said, "political equality, industrial equality and social equality. And he is never going to rest satisfied with anything less. He demands this . . . as an absolute measure of self-defense and the only one that will assure to the darker races their . . . survival on Earth." But on balance, the two men were not that far apart. We know from the work of Louis Harlan, professor of history at the University of Maryland College Park, that Dr. Washington, in his private deliberations and actions, was highly supportive of political and social equality for his fellow black citizens. Our nation owes both of these men an enormous debt. @ Samuel L. BanksExecutive director, Division of Instruction, Baltimore City Public Schools | February 28, 1992
BLACK HISTORY MONTH concludes Saturday. Here are excerpts from the essays of three Baltimore correspondents on African Americans who made a difference:No. 203, William Williams. The name is listed with the names of other recruits on the muster roll of the 38th U.S. Infantry. But this recruit was different. William Williams was a 21-year-old runaway slave from Prince George's County.He was a native Marylander. He had run away from his owner, Benjamin Oden, in the spring of 1814. On April 14, 1814, William Williams was enlisted as a private in the U.S. Army and wasassigned to the 38th U.S. Infantry Regiment.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | January 4, 2000
Jason W. Kaun has been something of a dabbler since high school. He studied criminal justice and business at Champlain College in Vermont and Harford Community College, but dropped out. He ran a business selling "sandfleas" -- or novelty items -- at a mall kiosk and used the proceeds to spend several weeks in Fort Lauderdale, Fla. He toted golf clubs at an Aberdeen golf course and helped his folks with the family-run sign-making business. Yesterday, he pledged the next four years of his life to a more steady job -- with the military.
NEWS
December 9, 1990
COX COMPLETES AIR FORCE TRAININGAirman Barry L. Cox, son of Rosina E. Galbreath of Columbia, has graduated from Air Force basic training at Lackland Air Force Base in Texas.In the six weeks of training, he studied Air Force history, organization, customs and received special instruction in human relations.Cox is a 1981 graduate of Walbrook Senior High School, Baltimore.NAVY'S SIMMS ENDS ENGINEERING COURSENavy Ensign James L. Simms, son of William and Donna Simms of Sykesville, has graduated from Basic Civil Engineer Corps Officer Course.
NEWS
By BRADLEY OLSON and BRADLEY OLSON,SUN REPORTER | February 12, 2006
Command Sgt. Maj. Michele S. Jones set up a chair yesterday morning in the middle of the classroom at the Sheridan Army Reserve Center in Northwest Baltimore. Surrounded by enlisted leaders in the Army Reserve's 80th Division, she slid her body under the chair and demonstrated: "Let's say you're a solider and you're a mechanic and you need to get under this Humvee. If you're not physically fit, you may not be able to fit under the vehicle." Jones, a Randallstown native and the highest-ranking female enlisted soldier in the Army, said many reservists ask her why they have to take physical fitness tests if they can do their jobs without passing them.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | November 10, 2013
Allan Stover wasn't even in high school when he enlisted in the Coast Guard in 1953. Despite his doctored birth certificate, he believes commanders could tell he was too young to enlist. Stover never admitted it - though he came close when a drill instructor screamed in his face at boot camp. "How old are you?" the instructor yelled. "Seventeen, sir," Stover responded nervously. "And I'm the Queen of Sheba," the instructor quipped. Stover was 14 - and he was never caught.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | August 9, 2013
Gov. Martin O'Malley has appointed Brig. Gen. Linda Singh to head the Maryland Army National Guard. Singh, currently director of the Maryland National Guard's joint staff, will be the first woman and the first African-American to command the Army branch. She succeeds Brig. Gen. Peter Hinz, who is scheduled to retire on Sept. 30. O'Malley called Singh "an extremely effective leader with the drive to take the Maryland Army National Guard to new heights and keep the organization among the best in the nation.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | May 2, 2013
Two senior enlisted leaders with an elite Navy dive unit could face charges of involuntary manslaughter in the deaths of two sailors at Aberdeen Proving Ground in February, and others could be charged, the Navy said Wednesday. The chief warrant officer and the senior chief petty officer, whom officials did not name, also could face charges of dereliction of duty in the deaths of Diver 1st Class James Reyher and Diver 2nd Class Ryan Harris. All were members of the elite Mobile Diving and Salvage Unit 2, which is based in Virginia Beach, Va., but has made frequent use of the UNDEX Test Facility at Aberdeen Proving Ground.
NEWS
April 8, 2013
North Korea's recent threats to target South Korean and American cities with atomic destruction have the shrill belligerence of a 6-year-old's temper tantrum. But while few analysts believe North Korea has the means to carry out its threats, U.S. and South Korean officials would nevertheless be unwise to ignore them. With tensions on the peninsula higher than at any time since the end of the Korean War, there's great danger a conflict could break out by accident or through miscalculation.
NEWS
By Bob Allen, For The Baltimore Sun | April 5, 2013
Terri Stafford used to take Lulu, her border collie mix, to medical facilities as part of a Baltimore-based volunteer program that enabled her to share her beloved pet's affection with others in need of it. "We did that for several years until Lulu got too sick" with cancer, said Stafford, a retired registered nurse who lives in Baltimore County. "Toward the end, when Lulu wasn't feeling well, she spent a lot of time hiding in the closet. But I'd say, 'Lulu, let's go visiting.' And she'd come running out and jump in the car. She loved it. "I also used to enjoy the way people would light up when I would bring Lulu to visit them," Stafford said.
BUSINESS
By Steve Earley, The Baltimore Sun | January 30, 2013
When Alissa Harrington was diagnosed with breast cancer at age 38, she did what she's accustomed to doing when she needs answers. She reached for her smartphone. The Stevenson University technology professional says mobile apps helped her overcome one of the biggest burdens for anyone confronting a life-threatening illness: Managing the deluge of medical records and appointments and communicating what comes out of those to friends and family. "Mobile apps have really eliminated that," said Harrington, who as an instructional designer builds online courses and trains faculty how to apply technology to learning.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller | August 29, 2008
Glenmore H. Drasher, an Army veteran and longtime musician who performed with a Harford County band well into his 80s, died Aug. 19 at a Baltimore County nursing home after falling ill from pneumonia. He was 95. Mr. Drasher was born in Hazleton, Pa. He joined the band at Hazleton High School, where he played the trombone. He was so enthralled with music, his only daughter said, that he did odd jobs as a teenager to pay for lessons to learn other instruments. After graduating from high school in 1930, he enlisted in the Army and soon began a decades-long career in Army bands.
NEWS
October 20, 2006
Harry Richard Spurrier Jr., a retired Bethlehem Steel Corp. worker and Navy veteran, died of stroke complications Sunday at Laurelwood Care Center in Elkton. The former Essex resident was 87. Mr. Spurrier was born in Baltimore and raised in the Hampden-Woodberry area. He attended city public schools and during the Depression worked in the Civilian Conservation Corps in Glen Rock, Pa. A week after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, Mr. Spurrier enlisted in the Navy. Serving on the USS Barnegat, a seaplane tender, as chief supply officer, he traveled during the war years to North Africa, England, Brazil and Iceland.
NEWS
March 5, 2012
The effort by the Democratic Party, the UAW, Michael Moore and - disgracefully - Rick Santorum himself to orchestrate Democratic crossover votes against Mitt Romney in the Michigan Republican primary fell well short of its goal ("Santorum and Romney fight their own class war in Michigan," Feb. 27). Mr. Santorum's unholy alliance with big government, big labor and extremists underscores his shortcomings as an economic lightweight and an all-too-frequent shill for the unions during his years in Congress.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | February 17, 2012
What's that chirping I hear outside my window?  The Great Backyard Bird Count is under way again.  The four-day annual event, which begins today (Friday, Feb. 17) offers even the most casual bird-watcher a chance to help scientists check up on the health of our winged neighbors. From the observations made by novice and expert alike, biologists may learn about how the weather this winter has affected bird populations here and elsewhere, whether migration patterns are changing and whether particular species are trending up or down because of disease or some other factor.
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