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By Ruma Kumar and Ruma Kumar,Sun Reporter | April 1, 2007
War was Lloyd Brown's chance to get out of the Ozarks. It was 1918. The 16-year-old Missouri boy lied about his age to get into the Navy. Before he knew it, he was on the gun crew on the battleship USS New Hampshire, climbing 50-foot-tall masts, peering into the waters of the Atlantic for German U-boats and helping capture one. Mr. Brown, the last surviving Navy veteran of World War I, died Thursday at the Charlotte Hall Veterans Home in St. Mary's County....
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NEWS
Pamela Wood and The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2014
When it comes to potential bone marrow donors, midshipmen at the Naval Academy are just the right candidates. They're a young, healthy and ethnically diverse bunch. And more than 2,000 of them have now joined a program, supported by the Pentagon, to enroll members of the military in a bone marrow donor registry. Midshipmen lined up this month to fill out paperwork and have the inside of a cheek swabbed - necessary steps to join the Salute to Life bone marrow registry, based in Rockville.
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NEWS
October 24, 1995
A photo caption in Sunday's editions incorrectly characterized the commissioning of the USS Stethem. It is not the first U.S. Navy vessel named after an enlisted sailor.The Sun regrets the errors.
NEWS
August 14, 2014
City police officials have replaced the department's homicide chief in the wake of a string of unsolved murders this summer that shattered what had been a period of relative calm. Maj. Stanley Brandford will take over the homicide unit from Maj. Dennis Smith, who had been running homicide along with the shooting and robbery divisions since April. Putting the unit under separate command is probably the right move given the outsized role homicides play in shaping perceptions of Baltimore.
NEWS
October 22, 1995
A photo caption in Sunday's editions incorrectly characterized the commissioning of the USS Stethem. It is not the first U.S. Navy vessel named after an enlisted sailor.+ The Sun regrets the errors.
NEWS
By Neal Thompson and Neal Thompson,SUN STAFF | January 19, 1998
When Jo Dee Catlin Jacob enlisted in the Navy in 1974, she had to wear white gloves and high heels, "and it was not at all uncommon to be expected to pour the coffee.""When I joined, it was impossible for a woman to fly, to go to sea, to be a SEAL," she said. "It was very much a traditional Ozzie-and-Harriet, woman-subservient world."Remnants of that era remain: Women still may not serve on submarines, and a study released this month by the RAND National Defense Institute found that they are underrepresented in the combat-ready ranks of the Army, Navy, Air Force and Marine Corps.
NEWS
By Tom Dunkel and Tom Dunkel,Sun Staff | March 7, 2004
One in an occasional series about the fitness habits of Marylanders. Bill Nissen, the highest-ranking enlisted man at the Naval Academy, thought about cashing out of the service in 1998 and collecting his 25-year pension. The master chief thought about it seriously enough to take a pre-retirement physical, whereupon he learned there really wasn't much point in retiring -- because he was already dead. At least Nissen was a goner according to the base hospital's EKG machine: It couldn't get a reading on him. Turns out, however, he was in such good shape his resting pulse rate was only about 60 -- too low to record a reliable EKG. He had to elevate his heart rate by doing leg kicks.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 18, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Fraternization -- it is the most common complaint being heard over the phones in the crisis center at Aberdeen Proving Ground after the alleged sexual abuse of trainees there.But what exactly is it?Military law defines it as a relationship between a commissioned or warrant officer and an enlisted subordinate that violates military custom and is prejudicial to good order and discipline.But beyond that basic criminal definition are many variables. It is not solely a gender-based offense, although improper sexual relations are the way it usually surfaces.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF Sun staff writer Tanya Jones contributed to this article | July 30, 1998
WASHINGTON -- The Pentagon ordered the Army yesterday to end its 20-year policy of allowing personal relationships between some officers and enlisted soldiers, throwing cold water on both romances and friendships.The change will bring the Army into line with the Marines, Navy and Air Force, which prohibit any personal ties between officers and enlisted ranks, regardless of their sex, said Defense Department officials.Defense Secretary William S. Cohen said a consistent policy was necessary in a time when the services are finding themselves stationed and fighting together in joint operations.
NEWS
By Angela Valdez and Angela Valdez,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | October 7, 2001
McGUIRE AIR FORCE BASE, N.J. - Airman 1st Class David Bernard, 22, attended New York City Technical College in downtown Brooklyn for only a few months before coming to a crucial realization: Once he graduated with an associate's degree in mechanical engineering, he would earn no more than he was pulling down as a jewelry salesman at the Piercing Pagoda. That's when he decided to enlist in the Air Force. Now, two years later, the Canadian-born son of Trinidadian immigrants plans on a long-term career in the military.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | February 27, 2014
Growing up, when Alex Pownall watched his father, he saw a man who loved his job. John Pownall has served 20 years in the military, the last 12 as a recruiter for the Maryland National Guard. He was sent to defend Andrews Air Force Base after the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, and advised the Afghan National Army in 2011 and 2012. "He looked forward to drill, and he came home happy," Alex Pownall said. So when Alex turned 17 last year, he needed no convincing. He joined the Maryland National Guard in October and is waiting to finish high school so he can go to boot camp.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | November 10, 2013
Allan Stover wasn't even in high school when he enlisted in the Coast Guard in 1953. Despite his doctored birth certificate, he believes commanders could tell he was too young to enlist. Stover never admitted it - though he came close when a drill instructor screamed in his face at boot camp. "How old are you?" the instructor yelled. "Seventeen, sir," Stover responded nervously. "And I'm the Queen of Sheba," the instructor quipped. Stover was 14 - and he was never caught.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | August 9, 2013
Gov. Martin O'Malley has appointed Brig. Gen. Linda Singh to head the Maryland Army National Guard. Singh, currently director of the Maryland National Guard's joint staff, will be the first woman and the first African-American to command the Army branch. She succeeds Brig. Gen. Peter Hinz, who is scheduled to retire on Sept. 30. O'Malley called Singh "an extremely effective leader with the drive to take the Maryland Army National Guard to new heights and keep the organization among the best in the nation.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | May 2, 2013
Two senior enlisted leaders with an elite Navy dive unit could face charges of involuntary manslaughter in the deaths of two sailors at Aberdeen Proving Ground in February, and others could be charged, the Navy said Wednesday. The chief warrant officer and the senior chief petty officer, whom officials did not name, also could face charges of dereliction of duty in the deaths of Diver 1st Class James Reyher and Diver 2nd Class Ryan Harris. All were members of the elite Mobile Diving and Salvage Unit 2, which is based in Virginia Beach, Va., but has made frequent use of the UNDEX Test Facility at Aberdeen Proving Ground.
NEWS
April 8, 2013
North Korea's recent threats to target South Korean and American cities with atomic destruction have the shrill belligerence of a 6-year-old's temper tantrum. But while few analysts believe North Korea has the means to carry out its threats, U.S. and South Korean officials would nevertheless be unwise to ignore them. With tensions on the peninsula higher than at any time since the end of the Korean War, there's great danger a conflict could break out by accident or through miscalculation.
NEWS
By Bob Allen, For The Baltimore Sun | April 5, 2013
Terri Stafford used to take Lulu, her border collie mix, to medical facilities as part of a Baltimore-based volunteer program that enabled her to share her beloved pet's affection with others in need of it. "We did that for several years until Lulu got too sick" with cancer, said Stafford, a retired registered nurse who lives in Baltimore County. "Toward the end, when Lulu wasn't feeling well, she spent a lot of time hiding in the closet. But I'd say, 'Lulu, let's go visiting.' And she'd come running out and jump in the car. She loved it. "I also used to enjoy the way people would light up when I would bring Lulu to visit them," Stafford said.
NEWS
By DONALD R. MORRIS | February 12, 1991
Until the outbreak of the second World War, enlisted men were essentially nameless and faceless; officers, while entitled to more social respect, were also faceless -- until they reached flag rank, or broke aviation records.You could turn the services upside down and shake them without finding a married man under the rank of sergeant; they were blue-collar workers and, in time of war, cannon-fodder -- in all nations.Until Pearl Harbor, junior officers were forbidden by law to marry for five years after commissioning.
NEWS
December 9, 1990
COX COMPLETES AIR FORCE TRAININGAirman Barry L. Cox, son of Rosina E. Galbreath of Columbia, has graduated from Air Force basic training at Lackland Air Force Base in Texas.In the six weeks of training, he studied Air Force history, organization, customs and received special instruction in human relations.Cox is a 1981 graduate of Walbrook Senior High School, Baltimore.NAVY'S SIMMS ENDS ENGINEERING COURSENavy Ensign James L. Simms, son of William and Donna Simms of Sykesville, has graduated from Basic Civil Engineer Corps Officer Course.
BUSINESS
By Steve Earley, The Baltimore Sun | January 30, 2013
When Alissa Harrington was diagnosed with breast cancer at age 38, she did what she's accustomed to doing when she needs answers. She reached for her smartphone. The Stevenson University technology professional says mobile apps helped her overcome one of the biggest burdens for anyone confronting a life-threatening illness: Managing the deluge of medical records and appointments and communicating what comes out of those to friends and family. "Mobile apps have really eliminated that," said Harrington, who as an instructional designer builds online courses and trains faculty how to apply technology to learning.
NEWS
March 5, 2012
The effort by the Democratic Party, the UAW, Michael Moore and - disgracefully - Rick Santorum himself to orchestrate Democratic crossover votes against Mitt Romney in the Michigan Republican primary fell well short of its goal ("Santorum and Romney fight their own class war in Michigan," Feb. 27). Mr. Santorum's unholy alliance with big government, big labor and extremists underscores his shortcomings as an economic lightweight and an all-too-frequent shill for the unions during his years in Congress.
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