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NEWS
May 2, 2005
Sophia Hartlove, a homemaker who enjoyed Japanese flower arranging, died of heart and lung failure Thursday at her home in Clermont, Fla. She was 87 and had been a longtime Timonium resident. Sophia Levinsky was born in Baltimore and raised in Curtis Bay. She was a 1935 graduate of Southern High School. While in her 20s she worked as a cashier for Shavitz and Sons Furniture Co. on South Charles Street. There she met her future husband, Henry Hartlove, who was working as a furniture buyer.
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SPORTS
By Blair Kerkhoff and The Kansas City Star | October 8, 2014
Before he brushes his teeth in the morning these days, Royals manager Ned Yost reminds himself of one thing. “Before I even get out of bed, I tell myself, 'Let's have fun today,'” Yost said. “Remember where you're at and let's have fun.” These are the best of times for Yost, in his fifth season in the Royals' dugout. He's the first manager to lead the franchise the postseason since Dick Howser and the 1985 World Series championship team. Yost owns his share of rings as a member of the Atlanta Braves' staffs from 1991 through 2002, but his first managerial tenure in Milwaukee ended two weeks before the end of the 2008 regular season with the Brewers losing ground in the playoff chase.
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NEWS
November 7, 2004
Matthew Aaron Cammarata, 23, died Monday of respiratory failure after a seizure in his Cockeysville apartment. He died in his sleep after a lifelong struggle with spastic quadriplegic cerebral palsy. Born in Towson, he grew up in Street, Harford County. He graduated in 2002 from Delrey School, a facility for children with disabilities in Catonsville. With the help of his parents, Ron and Bonnie of Fallston, and a staff of assistants, he was able to begin living on his own in Cockeysville about a year and a half ago. Last year, his parents formed a corporation, called Matt's Way, to enable him to receive state and federal funding for services that helped him live independently.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee and The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2014
Johns Hopkins isn't the only area Division III program with an untarnished record in 2014. Stevenson is 4-0 overall and 3-0 in the Middle Atlantic Conference and earned votes in the latest American Football Coaches Association poll. It's the first time the program has won its first four games of the season, and the team has already matched single-season records in overall victories and league wins set last year. Considering that the Mustangs were 8-22 overall and 6-20 in the conference, the current run might be shocking to some, but not to coach Ed Hottle.
NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN | August 19, 2008
Donald Quentin Cornish, a retired Baltimore firefighter and longtime Abingdon resident, died Wednesday of end-stage chronic obstructive pulmonary disease at St. Agnes Hospital. He was 73. Mr. Cornish was born in Baltimore and raised on Schroeder Street. After graduating from Douglass High School, he held various jobs before joining the city Fire Department in 1957. At the time of his 1987 retirement, he was acting lieutenant at Engine 30 on Frederick Avenue. He enjoyed playing poker, watching CNN, traveling and attending family reunions.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | August 31, 2009
Raymond Morrison Geisendaffer Sr., a retired Amtrak passenger conductor whose railroad career spanned more than three decades, died of bladder cancer Aug. 21 at his Parkville home. He was 86. Mr. Geisendaffer, the son of a mover and homemaker, was born in Baltimore and raised on Lanvale Street. He was a semi-professional middle-weight boxer during the 1930s in Baltimore and was a 1939 graduate of City College. During World War II, he enlisted in the Army and served as a military policeman in North Africa and Italy, until he was honorably discharged in 1945.
NEWS
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,SUN REPORTER | October 23, 2006
Edward Garlington Pettaway, a retired director of the state's employment office, died Oct. 15 of renal failure, a complication from an earlier surgery, at Stella Maris Hospice in Towson. The Baltimore resident was 64. Mr. Pettaway was born in Emporia, Va., and lived there until 1958, when his family moved to Baltimore. He graduated from Frederick Douglass High School, where he played tight end on the school's football team. After attending classes at both Baltimore Junior College and Loyola College, Mr. Pettaway joined his father as a laborer at Flynn and Emrich Foundry in Baltimore.
NEWS
By ANICA BUTLER and ANICA BUTLER,SUN REPORTER | June 18, 2006
More than just a place to get funnel cake, ride a Ferris wheel or listen to music, the African American Heritage Festival is a place to learn about African and African-American culture, promote local arts and to build community, those who attended the festival said yesterday. "We're all family here," Olu Butterfly told a gathering crowd as she played host and emcee at the festival's B-stage. She later added: "It's a wonderful place to be exposed to culture and to each other. It's like a reunion."
NEWS
By Donna W. Payne and Donna W. Payne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 26, 2003
Late Thursday night, Leonard and Barbara Pozor arrived in Howard County from their home in Poland on a visit to family here. By 9:30 a.m. the next day, the Pozors were scrunched into child-size seating in the Elkridge Elementary School cafeteria, along with granddaughter, Ola Pozor, and about 100 other first-graders, their parents and grandparents. Like most of the other adults there, the elder Pozors wore big smiles as they took in the sights of Elkridge Elementary's traditional Friday-before-Thanksgiving "Grandparents and Special Persons Day."
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | August 27, 2004
Albert A. Fellner, who supplied shoppers at Baltimore's Northeast Market with custom-cut meats and homemade sausages for 30 years as the owner of Fellner's Meats, died of bladder cancer Monday at Hope Hospice in Coral Gables, Fla. The former Rosedale resident was 65. Mr. Fellner was born in Weiden, Germany, and was 12 when he immigrated to Baltimore to join family members. He attended city public schools and spent summers on a relative's farm in Finksburg. "He went to work at 16 for Karl Sachs, who had a stall in the Northeast Market and a shop in Hamilton," said a brother, Joseph Fellner of Baldwin.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2014
The TV audience for Tuesday night's division-clinching victory was almost twice as large as normal for an Orioles game on MASN this season, according to figures provided by the channel. O's games averaged a 5.9 household rating this season, which means 5.9 percent of cable TV homes in the Baltimore market watched the games throughout the season. But Tuesday night the percentage of cable TV homes in the Baltimore market tuned to the game was 11.6 percent. That translates to 127,000 homes and 179,000 viewers.
CLASSIFIED
By Marie Marciano Gullard and For The Baltimore Sun | September 12, 2014
The story is a familiar one for many Maryland homeowners living along eastern Baltimore County's shoreline: The appeal, initially, is in having a summer vacation cottage. That is, until the inhabitants realize that with a bit of remodeling and updating, they can live in their dream home on the water all year long. This was the case for Bill and Jo Ann Loeliger and their three children, Erin, Kelsey and Burk. Their contemporary three-story home sits high on a bank off the south shore of the Middle River near Turkey Point - a setting quite different from that of their previous home in northern Baltimore County.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2014
Marie E. Scott, a homemaker who enjoyed attending auctions, playing bridge and traveling to France, died of cancer Aug. 27 at her Homeland residence. She was 87. The daughter of George Grant Thomas, a banker, and Marie Elise Donahue Thomas, the former Marie Elise Thomas was born in Philadelphia and moved with her family to Oakenshawe. She graduated from Notre Dame Preparatory School in 1945 and from the Bard Avon School, a Baltimore business and secretarial school, in 1946. In 1947, she went to work as a secretary for a doctor and in the late 1940s, she became secretary to the chairman of the engineering department at the Johns Hopkins University.
FEATURES
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2014
You get a crab, and you get a crab, and you get a crab! Everybody here gets a crab!  Oprah's in town. The billionaire media magnate, whose career took off after a stint as an anchor on WJZ in Baltimore, came back to the city Wednesday for a dinner of crabs and crab cakes in a private dining area of Captain James Landing in Canton, according to the restaurant's owner Bill Tserkis. Oprah posted a picture on Instagram with her partner, Stedman Graham, smiling and holding up crabs.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | June 24, 2014
Maryland's congressional delegation cruised to victory in Tuesday's primary, leaving Democrats positioned to dominate the state's House seats even in a year that's shaping up to be promising for the Republicans nationally. Six of eight incumbents representing the state in the House of Representatives - five Democrats and one Republican - faced challengers, but most of them were not well known and raised too little money to pose serious threats. In an election year that could have a profound effect on President Barack Obama's final years in the office - as well as on the fate of efforts to overhaul immigration laws and the U.S. tax code - Democrats and Republicans are battling for control of the Senate and the GOP is hoping to add to its majority in the House.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | June 20, 2014
Salisbury's bid to capture its 11th national championship did not unfold as planned as the team dropped a 12-9 decision to Tufts in the Division III tournament final on May 25 at M&T Bank Stadium. It was only the fifth time in 15 title-game appearances that the Sea Gulls failed to bring home the crown, but the result did not diminish coach Jim Berkman's positive assessment of this year's squad, which went 21-2 overall and 6-1 in the Capital Athletic Conference. “I really enjoyed this team this year,” he said.
NEWS
May 2, 2007
Clarence Edward Brunt Sr., a retired factory worker who enjoyed traveling across the country, died of respiratory failure Saturday at Sinai Hospital. The Northwest Baltimore resident was 78. Mr. Brunt was born in Baltimore and raised in Fairfield. He was a 1946 graduate of Douglass High School, served in the Army and had attended Pennsylvania State University. He worked for 35 years at Harbison-Walker Refractories Co. on East Patapsco Avenue in Brooklyn, until retiring in 1986.
NEWS
January 28, 2004
G. Wayne Hamill, a financial consultant who enjoyed playing poker and grilling outdoors, died of a brain tumor Saturday at his Annapolis home. He was 53. Mr. Hamill was born and raised in Catonsville and was a 1968 graduate of Catonsville High School. He earned a bachelor's degree in finance from the University of Maryland, College Park in 1972 and took graduate courses at Loyola College. He began his career in 1972 as controller for the Hecht Co. in Baltimore. He later was a financial consultant for Coopers & Lybrand and Price Waterhouse before establishing his firm, Select Resource, in Annapolis in 1988.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | June 19, 2014
ST. PETERSBURG, Fla.  - Caleb Joseph now can concede that there were several times during those late-night bus rides through the Eastern League when he considered calling it quits on his lifelong dream of making it to the major leagues. Joseph felt stuck in Double-A, a minor league proving ground for some and a glass ceiling for others, watching younger teammates as he grew older. That is what made Joseph's promotion to the major leagues May 7 from Triple-A Norfolk so satisfying.
NEWS
By Allison Eatough | June 10, 2014
Grab your picnic basket and enjoy live blues music in an Elkridge park. Dig out the easel and paint pictures of flowers and historic storefronts in Ellicott City. Or as the sun sets, learn how to salsa dance under one of downtown Columbia's most famous sculptures. Across Howard County, there are plenty of ways to enjoy the arts outdoors this summer, says Coleen West, executive director of the Howard County Arts Council. “We have opportunities all year round, but in the summer, we have a chance to see work outside of the galleries and concert halls,” West says.
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