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By Susan Rapp and Susan Rapp,Village Reading Center | October 28, 1998
Children enjoy reading stories about other children, and they especially enjoy reading about themselves. Create a book your child will return to again and again.First, make a blank book by stapling or sewing pages together. Paste pictures of your child in the book. Have your child dictate captions for you to write under the pictures; or, if your child can copy well, write out the captions and have your child copy them under each picture in his own book. Then label some of the blank pages with captions such as, "I can do anything if I try!"
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NEWS
Letter to The Aegis | March 20, 2014
I just wanted to tell you how much I enjoyed your column about the local history of the Joppa Town area last week. I especially hadn't known the part about the once flourishing port that had to be abandoned along with others along the northern bay and Bush River. Having grown up in Catonsville myself, I was also familiar with your comparing the modern version (1960s onward) with Columbia in Howard County, which was planned and built at about the same time. One more interesting personal thing was that I began my professional teaching career at Havre de Grace High School in 1973.
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By SUN STAFF | September 26, 1999
Rebecca Lobo, star of the New York Liberty of the Women's National Basketball Association, shares her passion for reading as a member of the American Library Association's Teen Read Team.Studies show that teen-agers who read for fun and talk about books with family and friends have higher reading scores than those who don't. Here's a conversation with Lobo about reading.Q: What kinds of books do you enjoy reading?A: A variety of books including fiction, nonfiction, spiritual or whatever a good friend recommends.
NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN | August 8, 2008
Thomas Joseph DiVenti, an appraiser and movie buff, died of cancer July 28 at his Ellicott City home. He was 45. Mr. DiVenti was born in Baltimore and raised in Granite in Baltimore County. He was a 1980 graduate of Randallstown High School. For the past 11 years, Mr. DiVenti had been employed as an auto repair appraiser for Bill and Phil's Auto Repair in Eldersburg. Earlier, he had worked in sales. He was an avid reader of history and nonfiction and enjoyed watching action movies and TV shows.
NEWS
By Jimmy Rouse | February 26, 1995
"I am reading three books now. One, 'Being Peace' by Thich Nhat Hanh is really beautiful, one of the most moving books I've ever read. This is a short exposition of Buddhist philosophy and applicability in the West in the 21st century. I agree with him totally - [though] I am not a Buddhist." The second, " Chinese Herbal Medicine" by Daniel Reid is a history of a 5,000-year-old medical tradition. " It would be as we were practicing medicine used by the ancient Egyptians." The third is Maxim Gorky's autobiography.
FEATURES
August 11, 1999
"I enjoyed `Miss Nelson Has a Field Day' by Harry Allard. I enjoyed the part when Mr. Blandwoth puts on an ugly black dress and acts like Viola Swamp."LaCapri RobinsonCherry Hill Elementary"I just completed kindergarten. My teacher, Mrs. Michel, taught me how to read. I enjoy reading all books, but if i had to choose one, my favorite book at home is `Arthur's Computer Disaster' by Marc T. Brown. I had a computer disaster one day, but it is all better now."Ian HughesYouth Benefit ElementaryThe Sun invites its young readers to send in their book reviews, and we will print them on this page or on sunspot.
NEWS
By Diane White, and Diane White,,the Boston Globe | April 30, 1995
"Endangered Pleasures: In Defense of Naps, Bacon, Martinis, Profanity, and Other Indulgences," by Barbara Holland. Boston: Little, Brown and Company. 192 pages. $17.95"Subtly, in little ways, joy has been leaking out of our lives," writes Barbara Holland. If only it were subtle, the leaking of joy from life. It's anything but, leaving a lot of old fogeys - and even some younger ones - longing for simpler if less enlightened days when it was still possible for a person to light up a cigarette or drive seat-belt-less without somebody making a federal case out of it.One of the pleasures of this delightfully quirky book of essays is that you needn't agree with the author's views to enjoy reading it. In fact, it's probably more fun to read if you don't always agree with her, because some of her opinions are not only provoking, but thought-provoking; and thinking, too, is an endangered pleasure.
FEATURES
November 25, 1998
Susan Rapp, director of the Columbia West Kumon Center, offers some thoughts on "great books."In my practice of teaching reading to children of all ages over the years, one of the enduring pleasures has been to hear one of my students gleefully comment, "Gee, that was a great book!"Without question, in today's print-rich society, reading skills are essential for success. Yet, ultimately, as parents and teachers we would like to see our children truly enjoy reading as well.Child psychologist Bruno Bettelheim proclaimed in his text "On Learning to Read": "What is required for a child to be eager to learn to read is not knowledge about reading's practical usefulness, but a fervent belief that being able to read will open to him a world of wonderful experiences, permit him to shed his ignorance, understand the world, and become master of his fate."
NEWS
November 7, 1999
Tim Dwight is a wide receiver and a kick returner for the Atlanta Falcons. Chosen in the fourth round of the National Football League draft in 1998 out of Iowa, he is only in his second year with the team and is busy getting a "read" on professional football.Here's what he has to say about reading.What kinds of books do you enjoy reading?"Adventure books, biographies and anything by Stephen King."What are you reading now or what book did you read last?" 'The Great Train Robbery' by Michael Crichton.
FEATURES
By Hearst Newspapers | October 13, 1993
Many women say they enjoy reading their horoscopes, a new poll shows, but they also say astrology doesn't affect their day.The poll, conducted by Redbook magazine with EDK Associates, a New York-based research firm, found that 58 percent of the 500 women participating in a national random survey agreed with the statement: "I like reading my horoscope, but it doesn't have an impact on my day."Four percent of the women said their horoscope does influence how they plan their day; 1 percent said they don't like to read their horoscope because they were "afraid it will influence how I handle things in my life," while 37 percent said they think "the whole idea of horoscopes is silly."
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun Reporter | March 26, 2008
Vernie C. Randall, a lively centenarian who enjoyed reading and following presidential politics, died Monday of complications from a stroke at the Fairhaven Retirement Community in Sykesville. She was 104. "She was a marvelous and most friendly person. When she entered the dining room, everyone waved. It was like the queen was arriving," said the Rt. Rev. David W. Leighton, the retired Episcopal bishop of Maryland. "Everyone loved to go and see Vernie because she was so joyful and alive," he said.
NEWS
August 24, 2007
Ernest V. Day, a retired banker and former longtime Eldersburg resident, died Saturday of kidney failure at Oak Crest Village in Parkville. He was 82. Mr. Day was born in Memphis, Tenn., and was an infant when he moved to East Baltimore with his family. He attended City College and in the early days of World War II, dropped out to take a job at the old Glenn L. Martin Co. plant in Middle River. He enlisted in the Army and served in the European theater, where he attained the rank of sergeant.
NEWS
By KATIE MARTIN and KATIE MARTIN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 4, 2006
Sykesville Middle School's Greta Gilmore said most of the pupils she works with come to her classroom as "reluctant readers." As a reading and language arts specialist, she gives them the extra help they need to develop good reading skills -- and find enjoyment in reading. "It's really gratifying when you have a student who decides reading is not so bad after all," Gilmore said. Gilmore, 52, of Eldersburg, has been teaching for 24 years. She was recently recognized as an outstanding teacher by the Carroll County Chamber of Commerce.
NEWS
By Laura Shovan and Laura Shovan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 6, 2002
"The kids, they completely amaze me every single time," says Sherry Elswick, Barnes & Noble Booksellers community relations manager. Elswick, an experienced book club attendee, organizes and attends several clubs each month for the store, but those are for adults. She recently joined in a literary discussion with high school students. "They come up with such insightful opinions about the books that they read," she said. Last month marked the debut of the High School Literary Society, a teen book club sponsored by the Barnes & Nobles store in Ellicott City and by Howard County public schools.
NEWS
By Laura Shovan and Laura Shovan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 6, 2002
"The kids, they completely amaze me every single time," says Sherry Elswick, Barnes & Noble Booksellers community relations manager. Elswick, an experienced book club attendee, organizes and attends several clubs each month for the store, but those are for adults. She recently joined in a literary discussion with high school students. "They come up with such insightful opinions about the books that they read," she said. Last month marked the debut of the High School Literary Society, a teen book club sponsored by the Barnes & Noble store in Ellicott City and by Howard County public schools.
NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN STAFF | March 18, 2001
In May, teachers from two distant schools turned a small encounter into a literary partnership that they hope will "peak" pupils' interests in reading for years to come. The Mountain to Mountain partnership is a new endeavor by pupils, reading teachers and media specialists at Mount View Middle School in Howard County and Mount Washington Elementary School in Baltimore. School-to-school partnerships are nothing new, but area reading specialists call the link between a suburban school and a city school for the purpose of increasing literacy refreshing.
NEWS
By Lan Nguyen and Lan Nguyen,Sun Staff Writer | November 15, 1994
Richard Whiting of Columbia seemed out of place perched on a small chair at Bryant Woods Elementary School, surrounded by five chatty children and a stack of books that included "Eek Stories to Make You Shriek."It wasn't exactly intellectual reading, but it was still food for thought at yesterday's "Books for Breakfast" program, in honor of American Education Week.Enticed by apple juice, bagels and pastries, about 80 parents read to their children. Teachers served the light breakfast and students offered up their favorite books.
NEWS
June 18, 2000
Advice and strategies to help your children read Building a literary lifestyle Editor's Note: Jerdine Nolen continues her series on language development. Her column appears biweekly. Because of the strong connection between oral language and reading, it is important for children to have a rich literary experience throughout their lives. A fertile environment to develop the necessary skills and appreciation for this ongoing process can be found at school. When a child enters school, educators work to build on what she brings from home, which is learning to recognize the symbols of language in the world around her. Preschoolers: * talk about things that happened * listen attentively to stories and retell (and sometimes make up)
NEWS
June 18, 2000
Advice and strategies to help your children read Building a literary lifestyle Editor's Note: Jerdine Nolen continues her series on language development. Her column appears biweekly. Because of the strong connection between oral language and reading, it is important for children to have a rich literary experience throughout their lives. A fertile environment to develop the necessary skills and appreciation for this ongoing process can be found at school. When a child enters school, educators work to build on what she brings from home, which is learning to recognize the symbols of language in the world around her. Preschoolers: * talk about things that happened * listen attentively to stories and retell (and sometimes make up)
NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN STAFF | November 9, 1999
Anyone with children of both genders knows getting boys to read a book unprompted is about as simple as getting girls to turn their eyelids inside out and gross out strangers in the grocery store.At Worthington Elementary School in Ellicott City, where teachers and parents are trying to come up with ways to keep boys interested in reading and writing, Fred Bowen tried to help yesterday.The Silver Spring resident, author of eight novels geared to children ages 8 to 12, seemed a good choice.
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