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Enigmatic

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NEWS
By HAIM GORDON | February 26, 1992
When Haidar Abdel Shafi was chosen to head the Palestinian delegation to the Middle East peace talks, very few of his fellow residents in the Gaza Strip were surprised.Anyone who has spent time in Gaza, visited the squalid refugee camps, drunk coffee with the leadership, walked through the bustling souks, or stood with the crowds near the jails, would have learned that one of the most respected men in Gaza is the enigmatic ''Dr. Haidar,'' as he is called in his home town.Why enigmatic? Some will say that he is somewhat taciturn and plays his cards close to his chest.
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FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | November 5, 2013
- On a chilly morning when other watermen on the Patuxent River dredged for oysters, Jimmy Trossbach sought more slippery quarry - American eels. "I don't know what we'll find here," Trossbach said as he guided his 45-foot workboat, Prospector, to a pair of empty plastic jugs bobbing on the water. His helper, Jake Walker, hooked the makeshift buoy and reeled in the eel pots or traps they'd set in the river two days before. The first cylindrical mesh cage they hauled aboard pulsed with a writhing tangle of olive green.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | January 25, 1991
'Enigmatic Expressions' When: Tuesdays through Saturdays 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., through March 23.Where: Maryland Art Place, 218 W. Saratoga St.Call: 962-8565.It's more than possible to appreciate Holly Hofmann's large pastels on a purely formal level without thinking of what they might depict or be about. They are fascinating to peruse for their colors and shadings of color, their light and shadow, their creation of volumnes and of space.But how can one not wonder what they are and what they're about, these weird, semi-organic forms in quasi-landscapes or interiors?
SPORTS
Kevin Cowherd | January 29, 2012
Mark Turgeon would make a lousy poker player. Everything he's thinking is right there on his face. Or in his body language. And even when it's not, Maryland's coach is almost genetically incapable of holding anything back when it comes to discussing the Terps . Earlier this season, he called redshirt freshman forward Ashton Pankey "brain-dead at times" before adding that "he's a very smart player. " After Maryland's 73-69 win over Virginia Tech on Saturday at Comcast Center, he said high-scoring sophomore guard Terrell Stoglin "was a little selfish" in the first half and was benched twice for poor shot selection.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun pop music critic | September 6, 2007
A few personal changes pushed Aesop Rock into more adventurous musical territory. The enigmatic underground rapper got married, turned 30 and traded the intense streets of New York City for the laid-back environs of San Francisco - all within the past two years. These events helped shaped the direction of his new album, None Shall Pass. "I thought nobody gets to this point without going through a reflective period," says the rapper born Ian Matthias Bavitz. "Something happens at this age where you find a newfound appreciation for things.
FEATURES
By MARY CAROLE MCCAULEY and MARY CAROLE MCCAULEY,SUN REPORTER | October 14, 2005
When Harold Pinter was a teenager in post-World War II England, he was threatened every day by a gang of boys who lurked in the rough London neighborhood of Hackney. "They were holding broken milk bottles," says Pinter scholar Steven Gale. "He wore glasses and he was carrying a pile of books. To them, he either was a Jew or a communist, and they didn't care which it was. He had to talk his way past them every day. Never once did he get hurt." Pinter, who turned 75 on Monday, hasn't stopped talking since.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | October 31, 2002
Jeffrey Hatcher's enigmatic Scotland Road opens tomorrow at Fell's Point Corner Theatre. The psychological thriller offers yet another twist on the tantalizing story of the Titanic. Under Steve Goldklang's direction, Michelle Pinkham plays a young woman found floating on an iceberg in the North Atlantic, dressed in century-old clothing and uttering only one word: "Titanic." Neal Freeman plays the man who puts her under surveillance; Katherine Lyons is the doctor he hires to care for her; and Margery Germain portrays the last-known bona fide survivor of the shipwreck.
NEWS
By Sarah Weinman and Sarah Weinman,special to the sun | June 1, 2008
The Dawn Patrol By Don Winslow In the Light of You By Nathan Singer Bleak House Books / 238 pages / $25 Singer's novels are hard to classify and sometimes tough to take. In the Light of You keeps the brutally dark feel of his earlier work but finally finds a working balance of tone and narrative so that its points about the dangers of blind hatred and following orders come through that much more tangibly. Singer makes horrifyingly clear how easy it would be for a teenage boy like 16-year-old Mikal Fanon, with a middle-class background turned awry, to find comfort in the welcoming arms of a neo-Nazi skinhead group.
FEATURES
November 1, 2002
What: A benefit for Literacy Works Inc. When: 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Sunday at the Shops at Kenilworth, 800 Kenilworth Drive, Towson Admission: $50 in advance; $60 at the door. Call: 410-887-2001 Alice McDermott, 1998 National Book Award winner and Book Bash honorary chair, Child of My Heart, fiction Madison Smartt Bell, Anything Goes, fiction Connie Briscoe, P.G. County, fiction P.M. Forni, Choosing Civility: The Twenty-five Rules of Considerate Conduct, social science Von Hardesty, Lindbergh: Flight's Enigmatic Hero, history Herbert Harwood Jr., Royal Blue Line, transportation/history Hi Soo Shin Hepinstall, Growing Up in a Korean Kitchen, cooking Haynes Johnson, The Best of Times, social history Laura Lippman, The Last Place, mystery Antonio J. and Jonna H. Mendez, Spy Dust, true life/politics Claire Messud, When the World Was Steady, fiction Paul McMullen, Maryland Basketball: Tales from Cole Field House, sports/regional Jerdine Nolen, Plantzilla, children's Ted Patterson, Golden Voices of Baseball, sports Michael H. Rogers, Answering Their Country's Call, history Gilbert Sandler, Small Town Baltimore, regional Elizabeth Spires, Now the Green Blade Rises, poetry
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | October 24, 1990
"What's in Her Mind: Women Figure" at School 33 (through Nov. 30) sounds like a show about content. But that's only partly, maybe even less than half, true. That's not to say that this is only a partly successful show. It succeeds in eliciting a positive response, but not perhaps in the way the three artists or curator Heather Tunis had in mind. The merit, in other words, is not always and never exclusively in the message.Nancy Ring's pastels are closest to "state of mind" works. Figures exist in a world of skewed perspectives and fragmented images, some of them demons, some objects of history or art pTC (the sphinx)
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | May 21, 2010
He is one of the most intriguing prime-time characters of the decade, and the actor who played him has Baltimore-area ties. I am talking about the character John Locke and the actor Terry O'Quinn, who lived in Reisterstown for years and he has moved back to Maryland, according to ABC. Both of them will be saying goodbye to fans of "Lost" tonight as this remarkable series ends its run. Sometimes it helps in saying goodbye to such standout characters...
NEWS
By Sarah Weinman and Sarah Weinman,special to the sun | June 1, 2008
The Dawn Patrol By Don Winslow In the Light of You By Nathan Singer Bleak House Books / 238 pages / $25 Singer's novels are hard to classify and sometimes tough to take. In the Light of You keeps the brutally dark feel of his earlier work but finally finds a working balance of tone and narrative so that its points about the dangers of blind hatred and following orders come through that much more tangibly. Singer makes horrifyingly clear how easy it would be for a teenage boy like 16-year-old Mikal Fanon, with a middle-class background turned awry, to find comfort in the welcoming arms of a neo-Nazi skinhead group.
SPORTS
By RICK MAESE | March 2, 2008
COLLEGE PARK-- --Not too long after he arrived on campus, in the final exhibition game before his freshman season officially began, James Gist took a bounce pass from teammate Chris McCray. Without breaking stride, Gist bowled over a defenseless 6-foot-6 forward and threw down a nasty two-handed dunk. The crowd exploded, and McCray would later call it "one of the craziest dunks I've ever seen." It was Gist's much-anticipated introduction, and Maryland basketball fans who were already expecting the second coming of Chris Wilcox went home drooling over what Gist might someday blossom into.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun pop music critic | September 6, 2007
A few personal changes pushed Aesop Rock into more adventurous musical territory. The enigmatic underground rapper got married, turned 30 and traded the intense streets of New York City for the laid-back environs of San Francisco - all within the past two years. These events helped shaped the direction of his new album, None Shall Pass. "I thought nobody gets to this point without going through a reflective period," says the rapper born Ian Matthias Bavitz. "Something happens at this age where you find a newfound appreciation for things.
SPORTS
By Heather A. Dinich and Heather A. Dinich,Sun reporter | October 21, 2006
COLLEGE PARK -- The whole point of playing college football, according to Maryland tight end Joey Haynos, is to play in a bowl game. "That," he said, "is what we dream [of]." N.C. State@Maryland Today, noon, Ch. 13, 1300 AM, 105.7 FM Line: Maryland by 1 1/2 today's game Matchup -- North Carolina State (3-3, 2-1 Atlantic Coast Conference) @ Maryland (4-2, 1-1) Time -- Noon TV/Radio -- WJZ-TV/ 105.7 FM and 1300 AM Line -- Maryland by 1 1/2 Series -- N.C. State leads 30-28-4 Last meeting -- N.C. State won, 20-14, on Nov. 26, 2005, in Raleigh Maryland offense vs. N.C. State defense -- Running backs Lance Ball and Keon Lattimore have started to develop into a solid 1-2 punch for the Terps, but the Wolfpack's defensive ends line up wider than the Terps are used to seeing.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | March 5, 2006
Sometimes I'll sit there - in a courtroom maybe, or at a desk with a phone to my ear - or I'll stand on a Baltimore sidewalk and do what they pay me to do, which is listen to people give their arguments, tell their stories and explain themselves, and it'll hit me: I couldn't be a psychiatrist. I couldn't be a counselor or caseworker. As clients told me their problems, I would too easily surrender to the temptation to blurt out things like, "Are you crazy?" or, "Please, stop whining!" I am not always the most sympathetic listener, nor am I the most patient seeker of truth, especially when attaining the truth amounts to something like holding the fog in your hands.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | July 19, 2002
Movie-lovers who haven't seen Alfred Hitchcock's 1958 Vertigo since its 1996 restoration owe themselves a visit to the Charles at noon tomorrow. They're apt to feel as if they've never seen it before because they've never heard it before. The post-1996 prints of the ultimate cult movie - Hitchcock's voluptuous exploration of l'amour feu - present the original musical tracks in state-of-the-art sound that extracts previously hidden undertones and highlights from Bernard Herrmann's score.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | December 17, 2000
She's difficult to categorize -- and proud of it. In a career spanning more than five decades, Eartha Kitt has been a member of the first major African-American dance troupe, an international cabaret singer (performing in 10 languages), an author of three autobiographies, and an actress with theater and screen credits ranging from Helen of Troy in Orson Welles' stage production of "Faust" to Catwoman on the 1960s ABC-TV series "Batman." People magazine dubbed her "one of entertainment's most enduring -- and enigmatic -- icons."
NEWS
By MATTHEW HAY BROWN and MATTHEW HAY BROWN,SUN REPORTER | December 12, 2005
A 55-year-old story about four British children, a fantasy world of talking creatures and the battle between an icy witch and a divine lion has made an Oxford don who died more than four decades ago the hottest Christian writer in America today. An explosion of new releases - dozens of new works of biography, criticism and inspiration, timed to share in the anticipated success of the movie The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe - is focusing new attention on the life and work of the enigmatic C.S. Lewis.
FEATURES
By MARY CAROLE MCCAULEY and MARY CAROLE MCCAULEY,SUN REPORTER | October 14, 2005
When Harold Pinter was a teenager in post-World War II England, he was threatened every day by a gang of boys who lurked in the rough London neighborhood of Hackney. "They were holding broken milk bottles," says Pinter scholar Steven Gale. "He wore glasses and he was carrying a pile of books. To them, he either was a Jew or a communist, and they didn't care which it was. He had to talk his way past them every day. Never once did he get hurt." Pinter, who turned 75 on Monday, hasn't stopped talking since.
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