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NEWS
July 12, 1994
Talk about riddles wrapped in mysteries inside enigmas. Winston Churchill's famous comment about the Soviet Union under Josef Stalin is even more appropriate regarding North Korea. The death of its venerable dictator, Kim Il Sung, marks the end of an era. He was the last of the national leaders who dominated the years immediately following World War II, for better or worse. He may prove to be the last of the communist supreme rulers as well.None of the major Marxist dictatorships has succeeded in transferring power to its heir apparent for very long.
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NEWS
December 2, 2013
The Obama administration is understandably frustrated by its efforts to forge an agreement with Afghan President Hamid Karzai that would allow a scaled-down U.S. troop presence to remain in the country after most American and NATO forces leave next year. Last week the U.S. believed it had finally reached a deal to that effect with Mr. Karzai, only to have the Afghan leader balk at the last minute, insisting he won't sign anything until the U.S. acceded to a new series of demands that the Americans thought had already been settled.
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SPORTS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg and Jeff Zrebiec, The Baltimore Sun | April 3, 2011
Everyone in baseball, it seems, has at least one Vladimir Guerrero story. There was the time a ball bounced in front of home plate before Guerrero smashed it into the outfield for a base hit. There was the time, just goofing around at Yankee Stadium, he threw a baseball 370 feet, from one corner of the outfield to the other, and smiled as he watched it clear the fence. There was the 503-foot blast he hit when he won the Home Run Derby at the 2007 All-Star Game. "It's amazing to watch him for a whole year," said Orioles reliever Kevin Gregg, Guerrero's teammate with the Angels.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | December 23, 2011
Perhaps there has been nothing more baffling to American eyes than the photographs of hordes of obviously grief-stricken North Koreans mourning the death of their 69-year-old dictator, Kim Jong Il. Under his reign and that of his father, the people of the globe's most closed society have remained mired in repression and poverty for 63 years. The genuine remorse, akin to what customarily is reserved for the passing of close personal family members, demonstrated the uncommon hold the departed leader had over his people.
NEWS
September 24, 1991
It appears to be a foregone conclusion that Clarence Thomas will be confirmed as a justice of the United States Supreme Court, so stating our preference is essentially an idle exercise.But suffice it to say that after two weeks of probing hearings, Thomas remains an enigma. At various times in his life he seems to have been something of a radical, then a Reaganite conservative. During the past two weeks, he has sought to cloak himself in the mantle of a moderate. If the hearings have demonstrated nothing else, they have shown that Thomas has the luxury of an accommodating conscience.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | February 11, 1994
ENIGMA 2: THE CROSS OF CHANGESEnigma (Charisma 39236) On its first album, Enigma offered a dazzling blend of unlikely elements, mixing muscular house beats, lush synths and sampled Gregorian chants into the eerie, unforgettable "Sadeness." So how does the group's second album, "The Cross of Changes," top that trick? By turning to art rock, naturally. Granted, there's still plenty of dance-beat vitality to the rhythm tracks, and "Return to Innocence" does a more-than-passable job of emulating the exoticism of "Sadeness."
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | August 13, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Once again, Democrats are asking a now-familiar question: What's with Bob Kerrey?Now that the suspense is over, with the Nebraska senator pulling President Clinton back from the precipice with his pivotal vote for deficit reduction, the enigma of Bob Kerrey is getting the couch treatment anew. Why did he seem to go out of his way to rap the plan while finally agreeing to vote for it?Ever since his election to the Senate in 1988, Kerrey has marched to his own drummer -- sometimes out of cadence.
NEWS
By BILL GLAUBER and BILL GLAUBER,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 8, 2000
MILTON KEYNES, England -- John Gallehawk thought it was an April Fool's joke. Instead, it was the start of a whodunit that might have baffled the intellectuals once assembled at Bletchley Park to crack Germany's World War II codes. After the tourists filed out last Saturday, Gallehawk, an archivist, made his final sweep through the treasures that adorn the estate's Victorian mansion. He walked to the left of a British flag stained with D-Day's grime, peered through the glass of a waist-high display case and noticed that something was missing.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,Washington Bureau of The Sun | December 22, 1991
WASHINGTON -- All the pieces were in place for what promised to be one of the most formidable presidential campaigns of this or any year. All the pieces, that is, except one: the candidate.When Gov. Mario M. Cuomo announced Friday that he would skip the 1992 Democratic race, he left many politicians shocked and confused."I'm a little breathless," confessed Paul Tully, the Democratic Party's political director. "I'll be hard put to figure it out."If insiders were finding it tough to explain why a clearly ambitious politician would pass up an opportunity to become his party's presidential nominee, their head-scratching only mirrored that of average voters.
NEWS
By Jeff Nesmith and Bartosz Weglarczyk and Jeff Nesmith and Bartosz Weglarczyk,COX NEWS SERVICE | June 6, 2000
WASHINGTON - London newspapers are up in arms over the movie "U-571" because it changes history and has U.S. commandos capturing a German submarine and a priceless encoding machine, when in fact the feat was performed by British sailors. Ignored in the trans-Atlantic tempest is the fact that it was neither Britons nor Americans who swiped Hitler's famous "Enigma" encoding machine, but Poles. More than a half-century after the end of World War II, the crucial involvement of Polish intelligence in breaking the Enigma code is still largely unknown to the public.
SPORTS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg and Jeff Zrebiec, The Baltimore Sun | April 3, 2011
Everyone in baseball, it seems, has at least one Vladimir Guerrero story. There was the time a ball bounced in front of home plate before Guerrero smashed it into the outfield for a base hit. There was the time, just goofing around at Yankee Stadium, he threw a baseball 370 feet, from one corner of the outfield to the other, and smiled as he watched it clear the fence. There was the 503-foot blast he hit when he won the Home Run Derby at the 2007 All-Star Game. "It's amazing to watch him for a whole year," said Orioles reliever Kevin Gregg, Guerrero's teammate with the Angels.
NEWS
April 9, 2009
IRVING JOHN GOOD, 92 Helped break Nazi Enigma code Irving John "Jack" Good, a retired Virginia Tech statistician who helped break the Nazi Enigma code for his native England during World War II, died Sunday in Radford, Va., the university said. He had been a professor of statistics at Tech since 1967. A citizen of Great Britain, Dr. Good had worked for British military intelligence on a code-breaking team at Bletchley Park, England. He and other scientists developed an early version of the computer to break one of the German encryption systems.
ENTERTAINMENT
By TIM SMITH and TIM SMITH,tim.smith@baltsun.com | February 26, 2009
For many listeners, Edward Elgar's Variations on an Original Theme, better known as the Enigma Variations, is just a great, colorful composition. For others, it's also a 110-year-old mystery begging for a musical detective to arrive at a startling solution. The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra will revisit that mystery with guest conductor Peter Oundjian this week. After leading performances of the piece tonight and tomorrow on a program with Dvorak's Cello Concerto and the Four Sea Interludes from Britten's Peter Grimes (8 p.m. at Meyerhoff Symphony Hall)
SPORTS
By DON MARKS | October 30, 2008
Gary Williams said after Saturday's scrimmage that the play of sophomores Braxton Dupree and Jerome Burney, and possibly freshman Steve Goins, will be a key part of Maryland's development. Dupree remains an enigma. As impressed as I was in how he transformed his body during the offseason, losing some 25 pounds, there is still something missing in terms of toughness and heart. Burney plays harder than Dupree, but he still doesn't look like he has much of an offensive game to be a factor.
BUSINESS
By Nancy Jones-Bonbrest and Nancy Jones-Bonbrest,Special to the Sun | July 11, 2007
Patrick Weadon Curator National Cryptologic Museum, Fort Meade Salary --$93,000 Age --51 Years on the job --Three The museum --The National Security Agency operates the National Cryptologic Museum, one of only two intelligence museums open to the public in the United States. Weadon is one of three full-time NSA employees who staff the museum. About 50,000 to 60,000 visitors come annually to view exhibits about cryptology - the making and breaking of codes. How he got started --Weadon went to work at the NSA in 1987 first as a special agent in the Office of Security, then as an intelligence research analyst.
NEWS
By Nancy Jones-Bonbrest and Nancy Jones-Bonbrest,Special to The Sun | May 13, 2007
For Mark Elton and his 9-year-old son, Mackenzie, the National Cryptologic Museum seemed an ideal place to visit. "We were zipping up [Interstate] 295 and saw the sign for the museum," said Mark Elton, a Catonsville resident. "My son's in the Young Marine [Program] and in Scouts, so I thought this was a good place to come in and spend our day off." They weren't alone. Danny and Tricia Samuel also decided to check out the museum on a recent visit from Ohio to the Baltimore-Washington area.
SPORTS
By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | June 8, 2004
As if the season hasn't been challenging enough for Orioles pitcher Sidney Ponson, even the weather has conspired against him. Saturday's rainout knocked Ponson out of the Tampa Bay Devil Rays series, so tonight he faces the Arizona Diamondbacks and five-time Cy Young Award winner Randy Johnson, who threw a perfect game this season at the age of 40. What else can go wrong for Ponson, the designated staff ace who's 3-6 with a 6.48 ERA? He's probably afraid to ask. Ponson has allowed 15 runs and 22 hits in his past two starts covering 10 1/3 innings - numbers magnified because they came against the New York Yankees.
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | August 17, 2001
A 3-year-old Rottweiler named Enigma will lose either his home or his life. His owner, Linda Wrobleski, said she will move. Enigma's latest victim, a 9-year-old golden retriever named Sam, rests at home, covered with nasty bites. So ends a week when residents of Century Street in Hampstead have felt terrorized by the specter of a vicious dog. Beverly Haugh said she and the 70-pound Sam were standing in their yard in the 800 block of Century St. about 9:30 a.m. Aug. 10 when Enigma and a yellow Labrador approached.
SPORTS
By RICK MAESE | April 1, 2007
NEAR EXIT 351, I-40, TEXAS-- --April 1985 - exactly 22 years ago - in a Sports Illustrated article, author George Plimpton introduced the world to a baseball prospect like none other, a pitcher named Sidd Finch whose eccentricities were as unbelievable as his fastball, clocked by New York Mets officials at 168 mph. One week after Plimpton exposed the Mets' top-secret prodigy, Finch disappeared. Or at least he seemed to. Perhaps he's who you really are. Do you have anything that would prove it?
NEWS
By Matthew Dolan and Matthew Dolan,SUN STAFF | July 1, 2005
A federal judge sentenced a former Towson diet doctor yesterday to seven years in prison for conspiring to cook up the drug Ecstasy, rejecting prosecutors' call for a much harsher punishment of three decades behind bars and a $2 million fine. "To this court, you are something of an enigma," U.S. District Judge Andre M. Davis told Dr. Robert M. Keenan at the end of a two-hour hearing in Baltimore. Keenan apologized for having "dropped the ball" in supervising wayward workers who had tried to illegally manufacture Ecstasy in his Fells Point home, but Davis rebuked him. "The evidence in this case belies what you just said," the judge said.
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