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By Moscow Bureau | April 3, 1993
MOSCOW -- Officials of the Russian Ministry of Security -- one of the successors to the Soviet secret police agency known as the KGB -- have summoned Will Englund, The Sun's Moscow correspondent, to appear for questioning, apparently in connection with stories Mr. Englund has written about Russia's chemical weapons program.Since last fall, Mr. Englund has written several articles about the program, based on interviews with scientists and officials involved in it. The contention of many sources in these articles was that while the former Soviet Union and later Russia were publicly supportive of treaties to eliminate chemical weapons, newer and more lethal weapons were still being developed.
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By BLOOMBERG NEWS | August 31, 2004
WASHINGTON -Consumer spending rose 0.8 percent in July, and incomes had the smallest increase since November 2002, a sign that job gains might have to accelerate to sustain Americans' appetite for shopping. Purchases of automobiles and other durable goods led the growth in spending after a 0.2 percent decline in June that was smaller than previously reported, the Commerce Department said. Incomes rose 0.1 percent, restrained by a drop in government Medicaid payments and farm income. A measure of inflation tied to spending was unchanged.
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NEWS
April 9, 1993
Will Englund, a Moscow correspondent for The Sun, was questioned for four hours yesterday by an investigator of the Russian Security Ministry about an article he wrote last year describing chemical weapons development in the former SovietUnion.He was interrogated by Capt. Viktor A. Shkarin, a former officer of the KGB, which became the Security Ministry after the disintegration of the Soviet Union and the Communist Party.The interrogation took place at Lefortovo Prison in Moscow. Captain Shkarin is heading the investigation of a Russian chemical scientist, Vil Mirzayanov, who was an identified source in Mr. Englund's article.
NEWS
December 20, 2001
They slept in tents or sleeping bags on the floor. Sometimes they had to sit outside to write their dispatches, so they could plug their laptop computers into a generator. A shower could mean sticking your head under a dripping urn in the yard. They constantly drew crowds, who stared at the foreigners from exotic America. Dan Fesperman and Will Englund, two of The Sun's correspondents who have been in Afghanistan to cover the war there, discussed their experiences recently during a live chat on The Sun's Web site, www.sunspot.
NEWS
By Washington Bureau | April 7, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The State Department said yesterday that it had "expressed our concern" over the Russian Security Ministry's summons of a Baltimore Sun Moscow correspondent for questioning about articles he has written.Will Englund was ordered to appear today for questioning by the security ministry that is the successor to the KGB. He was not told what he would be asked about. But the summons apparently is related to articles Mr. Englund has written about the development of chemical weapons in Russia and the former Soviet Union.
NEWS
By Deborah Stead and Deborah Stead,Special to The Sun | February 10, 1994
MOSCOW -- Judges at the trial of Russian chemist Vil Mirzayanov heard testimony yesterday from the interpreter who assisted Sun correspondent Will Englund when he was questioned last year in connection with the case.Emerging from the closed-door hearing, Andrei Mironov said he testified that the official record of that interrogation "distorted" Mr. Englund's responses about his interviews with the Russian scientist. In 1992 Mr. Mirzayanov had alleged, in two Russian newspapers and in The Sun, that his country was still working on new chemical weapons.
NEWS
April 8, 1993
The Russian Ministry of Security has ordered Baltimore Sun correspondent Will Englund to report back to Moscow's Lefortovo prison today for questioning, after informing him yesterday that his American lawyer and a U.S. Embassy official will be barred from the meeting.Mr. Englund answered an earlier summons yesterday but declined to cooperate when the Russian investigator refused to allow the lawyer and the consular official to be present. He said he had been assured this would be allowed before he went to Lefortovo yesterday.
NEWS
By Deborah Stead and Deborah Stead,Special to The Sun | February 8, 1994
MOSCOW -- Will Englund, a Moscow correspondent for The Sun, has been called to testify at the closed-door trial of Russian scientist Vil Mirzayanov, who publicly accused Russia of maintaining a secret chemical-warfare research program.Mr. Englund, who wrote an article for The Sun in September 1992 based on Dr. Mirzayanov's allegation, was telephoned yesterday from the Moscow City Court and asked to appear at today's morning session.He responded by requesting an official summons and later said he would ask for a delay "until I have a chance to confer with my lawyer," who is recovering from the flu.Dr.
NEWS
December 20, 2001
They slept in tents or sleeping bags on the floor. Sometimes they had to sit outside to write their dispatches, so they could plug their laptop computers into a generator. A shower could mean sticking your head under a dripping urn in the yard. They constantly drew crowds, who stared at the foreigners from exotic America. Dan Fesperman and Will Englund, two of The Sun's correspondents who have been in Afghanistan to cover the war there, discussed their experiences recently during a live chat on The Sun's Web site, www.sunspot.
NEWS
April 10, 1993
Moscow's Lefortovo is a forbidding-looking brick fortress prison built in the shape of a K -- a bizarre tribute to Katherine the Great by the architect, who was infatuated with the empress.Over the centuries, thousands have passed through Lefortovo's TC dark corridors. To some it was the starting point on a long journey through czarist penal colonies and, later, through Stalin's Gulag. Others languished in its tepid cells until they received the executioner's call. The lucky ones -- who were relatively few -- eventually were let go.Will Englund, a Moscow correspondent for The Baltimore Sun, has been making repeated trips to Lefortovo in recent days at the demand of the Russian Security Ministry, which is building a case against one of his sources.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 27, 1999
In Monday's editions, Sun foreign correspondent Will Englund wrote about a 6-year-old Kosovo Albanian boy whose cancer treatment had been suddenly interrupted when he was evicted from a Belgrade hospital. Yesterday, with the help of Englund and other journalists, a doctor found the boy among the masses of refugees in Albania and got him to a hospital where his life may be saved. This is Englund's account. KUKES, Albania -- Six-year-old Mergim Rama may survive after all. Abruptly discharged from a Belgrade hospital in the midst of chemotherapy 32 days ago and on the road with his parents ever since, the youngster will fly today to Albania's capital, Tirana, to resume his treatment.
NEWS
April 15, 1998
A NEW WORD entered the vocabulary of many Sun readers with the publication last year of a series of articles detailing the shameful practices within the "shipbreaking" industry.The Sun stories looked at the unsafe work conditions and pollution in the Port of Baltimore, in other U.S. port cities and in Third World countries brought about by shady operators of companies that break up old ships, many of them once-proud members of the U.S. Navy's fleet. It forced the federal government to re-examine its collusion in shipbreaking activities.
NEWS
By Deborah Stead and Deborah Stead,Special to The Sun | February 10, 1994
MOSCOW -- Judges at the trial of Russian chemist Vil Mirzayanov heard testimony yesterday from the interpreter who assisted Sun correspondent Will Englund when he was questioned last year in connection with the case.Emerging from the closed-door hearing, Andrei Mironov said he testified that the official record of that interrogation "distorted" Mr. Englund's responses about his interviews with the Russian scientist. In 1992 Mr. Mirzayanov had alleged, in two Russian newspapers and in The Sun, that his country was still working on new chemical weapons.
NEWS
By Deborah Stead and Deborah Stead,Special to The Sun | February 8, 1994
MOSCOW -- Will Englund, a Moscow correspondent for The Sun, has been called to testify at the closed-door trial of Russian scientist Vil Mirzayanov, who publicly accused Russia of maintaining a secret chemical-warfare research program.Mr. Englund, who wrote an article for The Sun in September 1992 based on Dr. Mirzayanov's allegation, was telephoned yesterday from the Moscow City Court and asked to appear at today's morning session.He responded by requesting an official summons and later said he would ask for a delay "until I have a chance to confer with my lawyer," who is recovering from the flu.Dr.
NEWS
By HAL PIPER | April 10, 1993
Ah, yes, a summons from the Russian judicial system. Fifteen years later, I remember vividly. And so now they're after Will Englund, are they?Actually, they're not, and they weren't really after me, either. But you never know.Mr. Englund, The Sun's Moscow correspondent, was summoned this week to the KGB's infamous Lefortovo headquarters for questioning in connection with two articles he wrote about Russian chemical-weapons research. A source for the story, Vil Mirzayanov, not Mr. Englund, was the target of the investigation.
NEWS
April 10, 1993
Moscow's Lefortovo is a forbidding-looking brick fortress prison built in the shape of a K -- a bizarre tribute to Katherine the Great by the architect, who was infatuated with the empress.Over the centuries, thousands have passed through Lefortovo's TC dark corridors. To some it was the starting point on a long journey through czarist penal colonies and, later, through Stalin's Gulag. Others languished in its tepid cells until they received the executioner's call. The lucky ones -- who were relatively few -- eventually were let go.Will Englund, a Moscow correspondent for The Baltimore Sun, has been making repeated trips to Lefortovo in recent days at the demand of the Russian Security Ministry, which is building a case against one of his sources.
NEWS
By HAL PIPER | April 10, 1993
Ah, yes, a summons from the Russian judicial system. Fifteen years later, I remember vividly. And so now they're after Will Englund, are they?Actually, they're not, and they weren't really after me, either. But you never know.Mr. Englund, The Sun's Moscow correspondent, was summoned this week to the KGB's infamous Lefortovo headquarters for questioning in connection with two articles he wrote about Russian chemical-weapons research. A source for the story, Vil Mirzayanov, not Mr. Englund, was the target of the investigation.
NEWS
April 9, 1993
Will Englund, a Moscow correspondent for The Sun, was questioned for four hours yesterday by an investigator of the Russian Security Ministry about an article he wrote last year describing chemical weapons development in the former SovietUnion.He was interrogated by Capt. Viktor A. Shkarin, a former officer of the KGB, which became the Security Ministry after the disintegration of the Soviet Union and the Communist Party.The interrogation took place at Lefortovo Prison in Moscow. Captain Shkarin is heading the investigation of a Russian chemical scientist, Vil Mirzayanov, who was an identified source in Mr. Englund's article.
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