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By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | May 11, 2013
As a journalist, I gravitate toward the lurid. That's just how we roll. If some post-adolescent crank tries to set up a "white student union" at Towson University, he is guaranteed ink. If some crackpot explains that George W. Bush was behind the September 11 attacks, he will get air time somewhere. If Orly Taitz does to court to claim that Barack Obama was not born in the United States, she will get attention from the press as well as from irritated judges. The loonier they are, the more easily we reassure ourselves that we are sane.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | April 12, 2013
Frances H. Mueller, a retired educator who had chaired the Bryn Mawr School's English department and also taught at Towson University, died March 24 of complications from dementia at Roland Park Place. She was 94. Born and raised on her parents' farm in Painesville, Ohio, Frances Heckathorne was a graduate of local public schools. After earning a bachelor's degree in 1939 from Lake Erie College, Mrs. Mueller taught English from 1943 to 1946 at Pennsylvania State University in State College, Pa. While at Penn State, she earned a master's degree in English from Columbia University in 1945, and the next year married William Randolph Mueller, a philosopher, clergyman, literary historian and author.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 29, 2013
Philip X. "Phil" Kaltenbach, a former high school English teacher who later became an expert in the field of collectible comic books, died Tuesday at Sarasota Memorial Hospital in Sarasota, Fla., while recovering from foot surgery. He was 63. The son of a Loyola University Maryland dean and a Loyola Blakefield High School administrative assistant, Philip Xavier Kaltenbach was born in Baltimore and raised in Towson. Mr. Kaltenbach was a 1967 graduate of Loyola Blakefield and earned a bachelor's degree from what is now Loyola University Maryland.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | March 25, 2013
James Harbeck, who writes the excellent Sesquiotica blog, has an article at The Week , "The strange Scandinavian pronunciation of common English words. " The title is a joke, because the common English words mentioned are all of Scandinavian origin. We say sauna v ery differently than the Finns do. A reader named Julia posted an irate comment: What a strange, Anglo-centric article! You're talking about words that English BORROWED from those other languages you mention and then call the ORIGINAL pronounciation 'weird'.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | March 3, 2013
Pat and Henry Bradley say their landlord decided to suddenly kick them out of his waterfront Dundalk house, changing the locks while they were still frantically trying to remove their belongings. The couple, who didn't have a lease, are to testify about their experience in Annapolis this week when House and Senate members convene hearings to decide whether to stop landlords and property owners from locking out residents without court orders and sheriff's deputies on standby to evict them.
NEWS
By Renee A. Foose | February 14, 2013
There has been much recent debate about Race to the Top (RTTT) and its efficacy in improving K-12 education. RTTT was a competitive federal grant that challenged states to pursue innovative reforms on a rapid timeline from 2010 through 2014. The reforms are designed to ensure that every student is prepared with the requisite skills to succeed in college or in a livable-wage career. Maryland, like other RTTT-winning states, is using its grant ($250 million) to fund a new curriculum and a controversial teacher evaluation model that incorporates student growth, as measured in part by state test results.
SPORTS
By Glenn Graham and The Baltimore Sun | January 23, 2013
Randallstown coach Kevin English knows exactly what it takes to win a state title, having won one as a player at Milford Mill in 1992. He continually reinforces to his players that it starts with hard work. This season, the No. 14 Rams are putting in the time and it's shows. They are 14-3 going into Wednesday night's game against Pikesville and have won six straight -- scoring 100 or more points in three of their past five games. On Thursday, Randallstown will take on No. 8 Poly in the opening night of the 17th annual Basketball Academy and will then face No. 6 City on Saturday.   English, also a science teacher at Randallstown, is 77-36 in his five seasons.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | January 9, 2013
America has a remarkably close relationship with its previous owner. It seems we no sooner threw off the yoke of George III than we started collecting mugs decorated with the images of royal wedding partners. England and the United States have been staunch allies for more than a century, and what diplomats call "a special relationship" has matured with time and wars. And as the breadth and might of British Empire diminished and we emerged as a world power, we still looked to the English with the respect of a student who has surpassed his tutor but cannot bring himself to acknowledge the new order.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | December 29, 2012
When, a couple of days ago, I suggested accepting they  as a singular to provide the epicene pronoun English otherwise lacks, there was the sort of brouhaha that one encounters whenever some minor idol is toppled from its plinth.  It occurs to me that the comments fell immediately into the stereotyped responses in disputes over usage and that I could report them here, perhaps using them as a template for responses to further kerfuffles....
FEATURES
Jessica Gregg | November 27, 2012
The benefits and challenges of raising bilingual children Growing up in Argentina, Monica Fetzer remembers times when she wanted to speak only Spanish. But her parents, the children of German immigrants, spoke German in their home. They sent Monica and her siblings to a bilingual school where they spoke Spanish in the morning and German in the afternoon. On Sunday, they attended a German church. Learning and speaking in two languages was part of her daily life. It was hard work, Monica recalls, and there were so many times when it would have been easier just to speak Spanish.
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